Gejza Boleman

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Born September 15, 1876(1876-09-15)
Selmecbánya (Banská Štiavnica), Austria-Hungary
Died December 20, 1961(1961-12-20) (aged 85)
Sopron, Hungary

Mechanical engineer, electrotechnician.

Gejza Boleman (Boleman Géza) was born 1876 in Selmecbánya, Austria-Hungary, (today Banská Štiavnica, Slovakia). After finishing the secondary schools in Banská Štiavnica and Braşov, Boleman studied mechanical engineering at the Technical College in Budapest (1895-98). After spending a short time in the Ganz factory, he worked in one of the oldest mechanical plants in Slovakia after 1899, in Kachelmann's mechanical factory in Vyhne. From 1900 he also lectured at the Chair of Mathematics at the Mining and Forestry Academy in Banská Štiavnica. In 1904 he took over the leadership of the newly established Chair of Physics and Electrotechnology.

Boleman published numerous contributions in these fields, mostly in newspapers on mining science (Banicke a hutnicke listy), such as Saving Lives in Electric Current Accidents (1912), and Three-Phase Commutator Motor (1915). The physics textbook, which came out in 1912, was compiled together with the mining engineer Jozef Fenykövi. In 1917, the first edition of his Electrotechnology came out, which was in practice used as a textbook for secondary schools, as well as expert literature for electrotechnicians.

In addition to teaching at the Mining and Forestry Academy, Boleman also constructed meters and electrical devices. After the Mining and Forestry Academy was moved from Banská Štiavnica to Sopron (Hungary), he lectured there until 1948.

He died in 1961 and is buried in Budapest [1].

Literature
  • Barta Ernő, "Boleman Géza (1876-1961)", Az erdő 11(97), 1962, pp 166-168. (Hungarian)
  • Ondrej Pöss, "Gejza Boleman", in Priekopníci vedy a techniky na Slovensku 2, Bratislava: Obzor, 1988, pp 445-446. (Slovak)
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