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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed listings see the Log, Recent, Contents and Index sections. Selected updates are posted on RSS, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Recent entries

Monoskop Log

Jeremy Matthew Glick: The Black Radical Tragic: Performance, Aesthetics, and the Unfinished Haitian Revolution (2016)

“As the first successful revolution emanating from a slave rebellion, the Haitian Revolution remains an inspired site of investigation for a remarkable range of artists and activist-intellectuals in the African Diaspora.

In The Black Radical Tragic, Jeremy Matthew Glick examines twentieth-century performances engaging the revolution as laboratories for political thinking. Asking readers to consider the revolution less a fixed event than an ongoing and open-ended history resonating across the work of Atlantic world intellectuals, Glick argues that these writers use the Haitian Revolution as a watershed to chart their own radical political paths, animating, enriching, and framing their artistic and scholarly projects. Spanning the disciplines of literature, philosophy, and political thought, The Black Radical Tragic explores work from Lorraine Hansberry, Sergei Eisenstein, Edouard Glissant, Malcolm X, and others, ultimately enacting a speculative encounter between Bertolt Brecht and C.L.R. James to reconsider the relationship between tragedy and revolution. In its grand refusal to forget, The Black Radical Tragic demonstrates how the Haitian Revolution has influenced the ideas of freedom and self-determination that have propelled Black radical struggles throughout the modern era.”

Publisher New York University Press, New York, 2016
America and the Long 19th Century series
ISBN 9781479844425, 147984442X
xiii+266 pages

Reviews: Slavoj Žižek (LA Review of Books, 2016), Marina Sofia Magloire (Women & Performance, 2017), Paige A. McGinley (TDR, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

Notes sur les mouvements (2013-2014) [French/English]

A free publication edited by Romana Schmalisch during her residency at Les Laboratoires d’Aubervilliers.

“The first issue analyses the conjunction of dance with Labour Movements of the 1930s (New Dance Group) as well as its use in the industry to enhance efficiency (Laban/Lawrence); it looks at the vague image that we have from various professions, researches the value of the performance of a work and its equivalence in the wage, and considers different forms of abstractions (notations and graphics) and training methods.”

“The second issue focuses on the question of education. In an interview, sociologist Anne Querrien discusses social norms and the school system. In her text, the London-based writer Marina Vishmidt revisits an earlier essay which considered the relationship between contemporary dance and the de-materialization of labour. What changes about this relationship as all employment becomes more and more of a brutal hypothesis in our post-crisis conditions?”

“The last, third, issue deals with what is at stake when one learns a job, with relationships between teachers and students, with various methods of education, and with the way these systems reflect certain social norms.”

Edited by Romana Schmalisch
Publisher Les Laboratoires d’Aubervilliers, Aubervilliers, 2013-2014
Open access
24 pages per issue

Publisher

Issue 1 (September 2013)
Issue 2 (March 2014)
Issue 3 (September 2014)

Clarence G. Williams: Technology and the Dream: Reflections on the Black Experience at MIT, 1941-1999 (2001)

“This book grew out of the Blacks at MIT History Project, whose mission is to document the black presence at MIT. The main body of the text consists of transcripts of more than seventy-five oral history interviews, in which the interviewees assess their MIT experience and reflect on the role of blacks at MIT and beyond. Although most of the interviewees are present or former students, black faculty, administrators, and staff are also represented, as are nonblack faculty and administrators who have had an impact on blacks at MIT. The interviewees were selected with an eye to presenting the broadest range of issues and personalities, as well as a representative cross section by time period and category.

Each interviewee was asked to discuss family background; education; role models and mentors; experiences of racism and race-related issues; choice of field and career; goals; adjustment to the MIT environment; best and worst MIT experiences; experience with MIT support services; relationships with MIT students, faculty, and staff; advice to present or potential MIT students; and advice to the MIT administration. A recurrent theme is that MIT’s rigorous teaching instills the confidence to deal with just about any hurdle in professional life, and that an MIT degree opens many doors and supplies instant credibility.

Each interview includes biographical notes and pictures. The book also includes a general introduction, a glossary, and appendixes describing the project’s methodology.”

Publisher MIT Press, 2001
Open access
ISBN 026223212X, 9780262232128
xi+1042 pages

Review: Nancy-Elizabeth Fitch (Oral History Review, 2005).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (83 MB)

Crack Cloud: Swish Swash (2017)

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Made by Crack Cloud, 2017
From the work known as Anchoring Point

via Crack Cloud

MP4 (68 MB)

A Peer-Reviewed Journal About, 8(1): Machine Feeling (2019)

“Digital culture has become instrumental for capturing and managing what Raymond Williams would once have called “structures of feeling”. The journal issue A Peer-Reviewed Journal About Machine Feeling alludes to this, and points to a material analysis of aesthetics and culture, including its technical and social forms, and in the way that this concept was originally employed as an acknowledgment of the importance of the hard to capture dimensions of everyday life. What potential new sensibilities and structures of feeling may arise in such normalized registers of our habits? What new cultural and social forms and practices emerge in the coming together of machine learning and structures of feeling? In each their own way, the authors in this journal explore these questions.”

Edited by Christian Ulrik Andersen and Geoff Cox
Publisher Digital Aesthetics Research Centre, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 15 August 2019
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA License
ISSN 2245-7755
219 pages

With contributions by Mitra Azar, Daniel Chávez Heras, Michela De Carlo, Iain Emsley, Malthe Stavning Erslev, Tomas Hollanek, Rosemary Lee, Carleigh Morgan, Carman Ng, Irina Raskin, Tiara Roxanne, Rebecca Uliasz, Maria Dada, Tanja Wiehn, and Brett Zehner.

PDF, PDF (16 MB)
PDFs