Tuned City: Between Sound and Space Speculation (2008)

29 January 2019, dusan

“Sounds belong to the City. They determine spaces and identities. For years, artists have been using city noises as a material to stage or to question urban space – new territory, however, for most architects and planners within the routines of functional planning procedures. Tuned City – Between Sound and Space Speculation searches for a new evaluation of architectural spaces from the perspective of acoustics. This volume presents various positions of architects, artists and theorists to expand the architectural discourse with the dimension of listening. ”

The English section runs from the page 97-192.

Contributions by Doris Kleilein and Anne Kockelkorn, Barry Blesser and Linda-Ruth Salter, Gisela Herzog and Gerhard Steinke, Susanne Hauser, Thomas Ankersmit, Pascal Amphoux and Grégoire Chelkoff, Raviv Ganchrow, Mark Bain, Arno Brandlhuber and Markus Emde, Michael Bull, Stefan Kölsch, and Jacob Kirkegaard.

Edited by Doris Kleilein, Anne Kockelkorn, Gesine Pagels, and Carsten Stabenow
Publisher Kook Books, Idstein, 2008
Reihe Essay series, 4
ISBN 9783937445366, 3937445366
192 pages

Reviews: Rahma Khazam (The Wire, 2008), Alessandro Ludovico (Neural, 2009).

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See also catalogues from Tuned City editions in Berlin (2008), Tallinn (2011), Brussels (2013), and Athens (2018).

Eyal Weizman: Forensic Architecture: Violence at the Threshold of Detectability (2017)

6 December 2018, dusan

“In recent years, a little-known research group named Forensic Architecture began using novel research methods to undertake a series of investigations into human rights abuses. Today, the group provides crucial evidence for international courts and works with a wide range of activist groups, NGOs, Amnesty International, and the UN.

Beyond shedding new light on human rights violations and state crimes across the globe, Forensic Architecture has also created a new form of investigative practice that bears its name. The group uses architecture as an optical device to investigate armed conflicts and environmental destruction, as well as to cross-reference a variety of evidence sources, such as new media, remote sensing, material analysis, witness testimony, and crowd-sourcing.

In Forensic Architecture, Eyal Weizman, the group’s founder, provides, for the first time, an in-depth introduction to the history, practice, assumptions, potentials, and double binds of this practice. The book includes an extensive array of images, maps, and detailed documentation that records the intricate work the group has performed.

Included in this volume are case studies that traverse multiple scales and durations, ranging from the analysis of the shrapnel fragments in a room struck by drones in Pakistan, the reconstruction of a contested shooting in the West Bank, the architectural recreation of a secret Syrian detention center from the memory of its survivors, a blow-by-blow account of a day-long battle in Gaza, and an investigation of environmental violence and climate change in the Guatemalan highlands and elsewhere.

Weizman’s Forensic Architecture, stunning and shocking in its critical narrative, powerful images, and daring investigations, presents a new form of public truth, technologically, architecturally, and aesthetically produced. Their practice calls for a transformative politics in which architecture as a field of knowledge and a mode of interpretation exposes and confronts ever-new forms of state violence and secrecy.”

Publisher Zone Books, New York, 2017
ISBN 9781935408864, 1935408860
355 pages

Reviews: Regine Debatty (We Make Money Not Art, 2017), Adam Rothstein (New Scientist, 2017), Sława Harasymowicz (Journal of Visual Culture, 2017), David Huber (Artforum, 2017), Joseph Confavreux (Mediapart, 2017, FR), Felix Bazalgette (New York Review of Books, 2018), Martina Tazzioli (Radical Philosophy, 2018), Noah Chasin (Springerin, 2018), Bernard Hay (Review 31, 2018), Anna Altman (n+1, 2018), Viktoriya Yeretska (BauNetz, 2017, DE), Erick Villagomez (Spacing, 2017), Andreas Petrossiants (Brooklyn Rail, 2018).

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Cedric Price: Technology Is the Answer, but What Was the Question? (1966/2015) [English/Greek]

5 December 2018, dusan

““Technology is defined in the Oxford dictionary as the science of industrial art.” Cedric Price affirmed in 1966 at the beginning of his lecture entitled ‘Technology is the answer, but what was the question?’. The lecture speaks about the Fun Palace, the transdisciplinary cultural centre that Price designed in 1960 for Joan Littlewood.

The Fun Palace, which was never realised, is emblematic of our own era. It lends itself more to the choreography of 21st century time-based exhibitions than to the object- based displays of the 20th century; it fosters a more communal experience, largely free to operate outside its material limits, and ventures into other realms of human experience. In Price’s own words, “a 21st century museum will utilize calculated uncertainty and conscious incompleteness to produce a catalyst for invigorating change whilst always producing the harvest of the quiet eye”.”

With an Introduction by Lorenza Baroncelli
Published 2015
[43] pages

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