Unbag, 1-3 (2017-2018)

13 May 2019, dusan

unbag is a semi-annual magazine that promotes critical engagement with contemporary art and politics. Commissioning artists, writers, and thinkers who work outside of mainstream discourses, unbag functions as a space to explore ideas through discussion and exchange.”

Edited by American Artist (1), Aaron Cooper (1-3), Andy Wentz (1), Charlie Markbreiter (2), Natalia Tuero Germán (2-3), and Mylo Mendez (3)
Publisher unbag, New York, 2017-2018
ISSN 2572-2786
c.98 pages per issue

Issue 1: Metis (May 2017, HTML)
Issue 2: End (Jan 2018, HTML)
Issue 3: Reverie (Sep 2018, HTML)

Radical Black Women of Harlem Tour (2019)

9 May 2019, dusan

“Harlem is both an idea and a place. What became known as the ‘Black Mecca’ began as a farming village inhabited first by the Lenape and then by the Dutch. The first Black people in Harlem, both freed and enslaved, worked on farms in the area known as Niew Haarlem. New Haarlem was formally established as a settlement by Peter Stuyvesant in 1658 and was named after the Dutch city of Haarlem. For generations, the sole connection between Niew Haarlem and Niew Amsterdam was a diagonal road built on an old Native path: a street we now call Broadway…

Learn more about this history and the extraordinary contributions of radical Black women who built community, fought for freedom, and imagined other futures, including Williana Jones Burroughs, Regina Anderson Andrews, Ella Baker, Claudia Jones, Lorraine Hansberry, Salaria Kee, Madame C.J. Walker, A’Lelia Walker, Victoria Earle Matthews, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Thompson Patterson, Dorothy Height, Pauli Murray, Amy Ashwood Garvey, Billie Holiday, Audre Lorde, Madame Stephanie St. Clair, Marvel Cooke, Eslanda Goode Robeson, Una Mulzac, Grace Campbell, and Willie Mae Mallory.

The Radical Black Women of Harlem Walking Tour offers an important contribution to the effort to uplift Black women’s intellectual, social and political work. We encourage community members, students, and educators to use this guidebook to organize tours in New York City, or as inspiration to design guidebooks in other neighborhoods and cities.”

Research and Writing by Asha Futterman and Mariame Kaba
Published in New York, May 2019
20 pages
HT jul

Author
Publisher

PDF, PDF (5 MB)

Coco Fusco: Young, British and Black: The Work of Sankofa and Black Audio Film Collective (1988)

3 November 2017, dusan

“Sankofa Film/Video Collective and Black Audio Film Collective are the most celebrated and controversial Black media groups to emerge from the British workshop movement of the 1980s. Their work focuses on the representation of the Black subject in mainstream and alternative media, also touching on such issues as institutionalized racism, sexual politics and national identity in postcolonial Britain. Challenging stylistic conventions of both documentary and fiction film, their work provides a basis for critical reflection on the history of Black film culture, Third Cinema, and their future directions.” (back cover)

Featuring essays “A Black Avant-Garde?” by Coco Fusco (originally published as “Black Filmmaking in Britain’s Workshop Sector” appearing in a 1988 issue of Afterimage Vol 14, No 7); “An Interview with Martina Attille and Isaac Julien of Sankofa Film/Video Collective,” and “An Interview with Black Audio Film Collective: John Akomfrah, Lina Gopaul, Avril Johnson and Reece Auguiste,” both interviews by Coco Fusco.

A publication designed to accompany a touring film exhibition of the same title curated by Coco Fusco and produced by Ada Gay Griffin.

Publisher Hallwalls, Contemporary Arts Center, Buffalo, NY, 1988
ISBN 0936739150, 9780936739151
65 pages
via publisher

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (9 MB)