Limn, 8: Hacks, Leaks, and Breaches (2017)

2 March 2017, dusan

“Hardly a day passes without news of a major hack, leak, or breach; with the scale of computer use and reliance on digital forms of data, no sector of society is immune to these data dumps, infiltrations, and floods. From the surveillance of dissidents to the hacking of elections to the weaponization of memes, hacking is changing in character, and it is changing the world. In this issue we ask whether hacking and hacks have crossed a techno-political threshold: how are hacks, leaks and breaches transforming our world, creating new collectives, and changing our understanding of security and politics. How has the relationship of hacking and hackers to their own collectives, to governments, and to the tools and techniques been transformed recently? What does it mean to be a hacker these days, and how does it differ from engineering, from “cyber-security,” from information warfare or from hacktivism?”

Contributors: Claudio Guanieri, Nils Gilman, Jesse Goldhammer, Steve Weber, Finn Brunton, Matthew Jones, Molly Sauter, Rebecca Slayton, Matthew Goerzen, Adam Fish, Luca Follis, Mustafa Al-Bassam, Sarah Tochetti, Paula Bialski, E. Gabriella Coleman, Robert Tynes, Philip Di Salvo, Sarah Myers West, Ashley Gorham, Joan Donovan, Goetz Bachmann, Tor Ekeland, David Murakami-Wood, Kim Zetter. With science fiction by Cory Doctorow.

Edited by E. Gabriella Coleman and Christopher M. Kelty
Published Feb-Mar 2017
Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 Unported License

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Morehshin Allahyari, Daniel Rourke (eds.): The 3D Additivist Cookbook (2016)

4 December 2016, dusan

The 3D Additivist Cookbook is a compendium of imaginative, provocative works from over 100 artists, activists and theorists.

The accompanying 3D Additivist Archive contains 3D .obj and .stl files, critical texts, templates, recipes, (im)practical designs and methodologies for living in this most contradictory of times.”

Publisher Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam, 4 Dec 2016
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License
ISBN 9789492302106
[356] pages

Editors

Cookbook: PDF, PDF, IA, Scribd (460 MB)
Archive: torrent, magnet (6 GB)

The Boy Who Could Change the World: The Writings of Aaron Swartz (2015)

31 March 2016, dusan

“The writings of the computer genius and Internet hacktivist whose tragic suicide shook the world

In January 2013, Aaron Swartz, under arrest and threatened with thirty-five years’ imprisonment, committed suicide. He was twenty-six. But in his short life he had changed the world: reshaping the Internet, questioning our assumptions about intellectual property, and creating some of the tools we use in our daily online lives. He was also a leading critic of the politics of the Web.

In this collection of his writings that spans over a decade, Swartz displays his passion for and in-depth knowledge of intellectual property, copyright, and the architecture of the Internet. The Boy Who Could Change the World contains the life’s work of one of the most original minds of our time.”

With an Introduction by Lawrence Lessig
Publisher The New Press, New York/London, 2015
ISBN 162097066X, 9781620970669
368 pages

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See also MIT prosecution report.

Journal of Peer Production, 8: Feminism and (Un)Hacking (2016)

31 March 2016, dusan

“This special issue of the journal shows a growing body of work that brings together feminism with hacking and making. The growth of internet technologies and the pervasion of computer culture into everyday life has prompted a renewed interrogation of the gender limits within these information technologies and digital media. From the shiny glass screens on our mobile devices to the sprawling campuses of technology corporations, gendered configurations of power within technoculture have become the focus of attention in popular culture, media, and academic scholarship.” (from the Introduction)

Edited by Shaowen Bardzell, Lilly Nguyen, and Sophie Toupin (a.k.a. SSL Nagbot)
Published March 2016
Open access
ISSN 2213-5316

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Alessandro Delfanti: Biohackers: The Politics of Open Science (2013)

8 November 2014, dusan

Biohackers explores fundamental changes occuring in the circulation and ownership of scientific information. Alessandro Delfanti argues that the combination of the ethos of 20th century science, the hacker movement and the free software movement is producing an open science culture which redefines the relationship between researchers, scientific institutions and commercial companies.

Biohackers looks at the emergence of the citizen biology community ‘DIYbio’, the shift to open access by the American biologist Craig Venter and the rebellion of the Italian virologist Ilaria Capua against WHO data-sharing policies.

Delfanti argues that these biologists and many others are involved in a transformation of both life sciences and information systems, using open access tools and claiming independence from both academic and corporate institutions.”

Publisher Pluto Press, London, 2013
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License
ISBN 9781849649070
176 pages

Review (Alice Bell, The Guardian, 2013)
Review (Stefano Golinelli and Luc Henry, Science, 2014)

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