code {poems} (2012)

2 January 2018, dusan

An anthology of poems written in source code.

Works by Aaron Broder, Alejandro Corredor, Álvaro Matías Wong Díaz, Andrew Couch, Andrew Parker, Antonio Moujadami, Atanas Bozdarov, Attila Palfalusi, Aymeric Mansoux, Bacchus Beale, Ben Englisch, Brad Sorensen, Bram De Buyser, Bruno Herbelin, Carrie Padian, Chris Adams, Chris Boucher, Cosima Dipalma, Dan Brown, Dane Hillard, Daniel Bezerra, Dave McKellar, Dave Mezee, David Berry, David Cantillon, David Devanny, David Homes, David Sjunnesson, Dean M Kukol, Dom Slatford, Ed Schenk, Elena Machkasova, Erik Knechtel, Giulio Presazzi, Gorenje Smack, Guilherme Kerr, Iris Dunkle, Irtaza Barlas, Izzy Edwards, Jake Forsberg, James Grant, Jason Kopylec, Jason Rowland, Jasper Speicher, Jeffrey Knight, Jennifer Mace, Jerome Saint-Clair, Jesse Pascoe, Joaquim d’Souza, John Dale, John McGuiness, John Saylor, Jolene Dunne, Jon Bounds, Jon Coe, Jonny Plackett, Jose Portelo, Josh Fongheiser, Joshua Reisenauer, Jot Kali, Ken Hubbell, Kenny Brown, Lans Nelson, Lutalo Joseph, Magda Arques, Marc van der Holst, Marco Triverio, Marcus Ross, Mario Sangiorgio, Mark Whybird, Mary Alexandra Agner, Matias Chomicki, Matt Painter, Matthew Painter, Matthew Perkins, Matthew Ward, Michael Cheung, Michael Fall, Mikey Hogarth, Nancy Mauro-Flude, Nataliya Petkova, Nemesis Fixx, Nicholas Starke, Nick Daly, Pall Thayer, Paul Illingworth, Peter Schonefeld, Petroula Sepeta, Rafael Romero, Ramsey Nasser, Rena Mosteirin, Renato Fabbri, Ricardo Sismeiro, Richard Fletcher, Richard Littauer, Roger Donat, Ruggero Castagnola, Ryan Christiansen, Ryan Kabir, Shani Naeema, Shawn Lawson, Signe Breum, Soon Van, Suhail Thakur, Sylke Boyd, Terek Ertman, Thibault Autheman, Thomas Braun, Thomas Pellegrini, Tobby Cheruthuruthil, Ubaldo Pescatore, V Nels, Vilson Vieira, Viviana Alvarez Chomón, William Dupré, William Linville, Wolf Herrera, Xtine Burrough, Yann van der Cruyssen, and Yves Daoust.

Edited by David Gauthier, Jamie Allen, Joshua Noble, and Marcin Ignac
Publisher Ishac Bertran, [Barcelona], Sep 2012
Second edition, Oct 2012
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 Unported License
xii+67 pages
via aaaaarg

Book website
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Gene Kogan, Francis Tseng: Machine Learning for Artists (2016–)

13 October 2016, dusan

“This is an in-development book about machine learning. The first draft is expected early-2017. Some chapters are nearly complete, some are very rough, some are just stubs.

Guides and Demos are being released as we go. Guides are a collection of practical resources for working with machine learning software, including code and tutorials. Demos are are a collection of figures and interactive demos for highlighting important concepts in machine learning, and supplementing the book’s materials.”

Chapters (HTML)
Guides (HTML, Python)
Demos (HTML, Javascript)

Computational Culture, 5: Rhetoric and Computation (2016)

19 January 2016, dusan

“How can machines be rhetorical? The readers of Computational Culture need not be convinced that computation drives the digital and networked spaces in which we interact, argue and communicate: word processing programs, videogames, banking and commerce systems, social networking sites, and smartphone apps that track our data (both with and without our knowledge) are all evidence that computation in code shapes nearly every space we inhabit. Computation in code affects and effects our lives. Computational machines affect us through their programming and design, as well the discourse they can generate, via text, image, sound, and so on. By writing computer code and software, programmers and designers construct machines that make arguments and judgments and address audiences both machinic and human. In this sense, even the most mundane computational technologies can be seen as rhetorical –from the grocery store check-out scanner to the high school graphing calculator–because any computational machine shapes and constrains behavior. […]

Software studies has paved the way for many disciplines to approach software as an object of study and computer programs as written artifacts, and we may add rhetoric to our toolkit to do so. We can use rhetoric to interpret the ways that computation addresses and responds to various audiences and exigencies, makes assertions about identities, and ultimately participates in a complex ecology of forces that shape behavior and perception. This version of rhetoric is more expansive than the limited, Aristotelian definition rhetoric as the ‘available means of persuasion.’ Just as software studies recognizes that software is more than code, and that code is more than ones and zeros, contemporary rhetoric is interested in more than the content of arguments; it also concerns the relational forces that precede and exceed arguments.” (from the introduction)

With thematic texts by Steve Holmes, John Tinnell, Kevin Brock, Elizabeth Losh, Jennifer Maher, Alexander Monea, Andreas Birkbak & Hjalmar Bang Carlsen, Matthew Bellinger; articles by M. Beatrice Fazi, Erica Robles-Anderson and Patrik Svensson, Michael Lachney, William Babbitt & Ron Eglash, and review section.

Edited by Annette Vee and James J. Brown, Jr.
Published in January 2016
Open Access
ISSN 2047-2390

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