Laboria Cuboniks: The Xenofeminist Manifesto: A Politics for Alienation (2018)

20 October 2018, dusan

“The real emancipatory potential of technology remains unrealised.

The Xenofeminist Manifesto calls for the scaling up of feminism. Contemporary feminism, it contends, is limited by its predominant investment in local and micropolitical action. What is needed is a feminism capable of systemic intervention. The Xenofeminist Manifesto propose that such a feminism must start from a new universal–one no longer coded as cis, straight, white, and male–with Xenofeminism as its theoretical and technological platform. Drawing on queer and transfeminist theory, as well as philosophical rationalism, against nature and biological essentialism, the feminist collective Laboria Cuboniks instead invest in alienation and the anti-natural, in seizing technology and in embracing the desire for an alien future.

If nature is unjust, change nature!”

Publisher Verso, London, September 2018
Creative Commons BY 4.0 International License
ISBN 9781788731577, 1788731573
95 pages

Commentary: Annie Goh (2018).

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML
EPUB

Anti-Natural Even Salon (2016)

23 January 2018, dusan

“Anti-Natural prompts invited artists and theorists into a range of responses to notions on the production of the natural, where the human imperative is the need to produce or change nature, to re-nature nature, and so to make the highest poverty, the diagonalising of new ecologies and forms of life without the supra-prosthetic of ‘Nature’ itself.”

Contributions by Danilo Mandic, Himali Singh Soin, Inigo Wilkins, Jelena Stojkovic, Jonathan Kemp, Laboria Cuboniks / Diann Bauer, Marina Vishmidt, Nihal Yesil, Paul Abbott, Roc Jimenez de Cisneros, Sabina Ahn, Tim Goldie, Felix De Bousies, and _blank.

Publisher Even Press, London, 2016
52 pages

Event
Publisher

PDF, PDF

Caren Kaplan: Aerial Aftermaths: Wartime from Above (2018)

16 January 2018, dusan

“From the first vistas provided by flight in balloons in the eighteenth century to the most recent sensing operations performed by military drones, the history of aerial imagery has marked the transformation of how people perceived their world, better understood their past, and imagined their future. In Aerial Aftermaths Caren Kaplan traces this cultural history, showing how aerial views operate as a form of world-making tied to the times and places of war. Kaplan’s investigation of the aerial arts of war—painting, photography, and digital imaging—range from England’s surveys of Scotland following the defeat of the 1746 Jacobite rebellion and early twentieth-century photographic mapping of Iraq to images taken in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. Throughout, Kaplan foregrounds aerial imagery’s importance to modern visual culture and its ability to enforce colonial power, demonstrating both the destructive force and the potential for political connection that come with viewing from above.”

Publisher Duke University Press, Durham, 2018
Next Wave: New Directions in Women’s Studies series
ISBN 9780822370086, 0822370085
xiv+298 pages
via André

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML