The Art of Participation: 1950 to Now (2008)

22 July 2019, dusan

“This volume explores the rich and varied history of participatory art, from early happenings and performances to more recent practices demanding audience interaction. As browsing, sharing, collecting, and producing increasingly permeate every aspect of society, this project reveals the ways in which artists and viewers have approached the creation of open works of art. Featured artists include Abramović/Ulay, Vito Acconci, Joseph Beuys, John Cage, Janet Cardiff, Lygia Clark, Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Dan Graham, Hans Haacke, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Allan Kaprow, Antoni Muntadas, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, and Erwin Wurm.

Essays by Rudolf Frieling, Boris Groys, Robert Atkins, and Lev Manovich identify seminal moments in participatory practice from the 1950s to the present day and are accompanied by color illustrations, including documentation of significant projects by major figures such as Hélio Oiticica, Joan Jonas, Gordon Matta-Clark, Komar & Melamid, and Gabriel Orozco.”

With an Introduction by Rudolf Frieling
Publisher San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, and Thames & Hudson, New York, 2008
ISBN 9780500238585, 0500238588
212 pages

Reviews: Terri Cohn (CAA Reviews, 2009), Art Practical (2009).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (11 MB)

Fred Moten, Wu Tang: Who Touched Me? (2016)

6 June 2019, dusan

Who Touched Me? is a compilation of research by Fred Moten and Wu Tsang, who together cohabit the roles of poet and performance artist. The publication traces the development of their sculptural performance Gravitational Feel, which was yet to be realized at the time the book was due to print. This book introduces the reader to this work in its virtual state, while tracing Moten and Tsang’s lived experience of collaboration through a body of text, which is composed of email correspondence, notes, poetry, fragments of essays, and transcriptions of earlier collaborative work. Together these entwined texts create a new socio-poetic form. To quote from the book’s pages, ‘The research/experiment is in how to sense entanglement.'”

Introduction by Frédérique Bergholtz and Susan Gibb
Publisher If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution, Amsterdam, 2016
Performance in Residence series
ISBN 9789492139061, 9492139065
61 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (9 MB)

Brandon LaBelle, Christof Migone (eds.): Writing Aloud: The Sonics of Language (2001)

8 May 2019, dusan

Writing Aloud is an anthology focusing on the relationship of language to sound, writing to music, and brings together a highly diverse collection of essays, interviews, meditations, visual projects, text-sound scores and audio by some of the leading individuals in the field of cultural and performance studies, experimental music and contemporary art.

Starting from the perspective that the sound of the voice is crucial to our perceptions and understandings of language, to the creative possibility of being without language, Writing Aloud examines the repercussions of such a perspective. Considering the sonics of words, it extends this examination of vocalization and articulation into how it contributes to and influences communication and notions of self-recognition. And further, how orality effects the act of writing itself, stages the tension between sense and non-sense, and provides space for self-reflection.

Through cultural, historical, linguistic, musical and artistic histories and practices, this field of research is addressed in order to open up a diversity of attitudes and approaches toward a broader understanding of what it means to speak. Such works as Nicholas Zurbrugg’s detailed examination of the history of sound-poetry, which underscores this often under-represented field as being a vital link between the avant-gardes of modernism and contemporary culture; Sean Cubitt’s meditation on the voice in relation to contemporary technologies; and Fred Moten’s examination of the Black avant-garde through the works of Billy Strayhorn, Delaney, and Antonin Artaud in relation to deeper questions of identity – these original works advance our understanding of ‘vocalization’ as existing within a complex and highly charged social, political and cultural arena where identity is a contested site.

In conjunction with these analytical works, Writing Aloud also provides readers with some valuable reconsiderations and reproductions of historical work, such as Marina Abramovic’s performance from 1975, Freeing the Voice, in which the artist exhales every breath as a scream for one hour; plus a revealing and insightful interview with the composer Alvin Lucier, whose compositions from the 60s to today continue to challenge and astound listeners; a valuable document of a long lost French artist, Arthur Petronio, whose recordings from the mid-60s, Verbophonie, trace a highly personal and idiosyncratic terrain of voice and electronics; and important visual and audio documentation of an early installation, Body Building, by the artist Vito Acconci. Through such a range of contributions Writing Aloud suggests links between disparate practices and stimulates conversations between disciplines, one which follows the line where text and sound meet, speaking and music collide, and theory and writing converse.

Also included in the anthology are GX Jupitter-Larsen, Terri Kapsalis, Norie Neumark, Kim Dawn, Alexandre St-Onge, Jocelyn Robert, Robert Ashley, Achim Wollscheid, Bart Plantenga, Vincent Barras, Michel Chion, John Duncan, and others.”

Publisher Errant Bodies, Los Angeles, 2001
ISBN 9780965557030, 0965557030
279 pages
via cmigone

Reviews: Christopher DeLaurenti (The Tentacle, 2001), Jim Drobnick (Parachute, 2002), John Dack (Computer Music Journal, 2003).

Publisher
Editor
WorldCat

PDF (37 MB)