AI Now 2019 Report (2019)

14 December 2019, dusan

This report “examines new research on the risks and harms of AI, including its use by companies to aggressively manage and control workers, its climate impact, and the growing use of facial and affect recognition. We also look at the growing movements that are demanding a halt to risky and dangerous AI, and offer recommendations on what policymakers, advocates, and researchers can do to address these harms.”

By Kate Crawford, Roel Dobbe, Theodora Dryer, Genevieve Fried, Ben Green, Elizabeth Kaziunas, Amba Kak, Varoon Mathur, Erin McElroy, Andrea Nill Sánchez, Deborah Raji, Joy Lisi Rankin, Rashida Richardson, Jason Schultz, Sarah Myers West, and Meredith Whittaker
Publisher AI Now Institute, New York, 12 Dec 2019
Creative Commons BY-ND 4.0 International License
100 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF

Ginger Nolan: The Neocolonialism of the Global Village (2018)

8 July 2019, dusan

“The term ‘global village’—coined in the 1960s by Marshall McLuhan—has persisted into the twenty-first century as a key trope of techno-humanitarian discourse, casting economic and technical transformations in a utopian light. Against that tendency, this book excavates the violent history, originating with techniques of colonial rule in Africa, that gave rise to the concept of the global village. To some extent, we are all global villagers, but given the imbalances of semiotic power, some belong more thoroughly than others. Reassessing McLuhan’s media theories in light of their entanglement with colonial and neocolonial techniques, Nolan implicates various arch-paradigms of power (including ‘terra-power’) in the larger prerogative of managing human populations.”

Publisher University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 2018
Forerunners: Ideas First series, 25
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISBN 9781517904869, 1517904862
69 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML

ArtLeaks Gazette (2013–)

19 February 2019, dusan




“ArtLeaks is a collective platform initiated by an international group of artists, curators, art historians and intellectuals in response to the abuse of their professional integrity and the open infraction of their labor rights. In the art world, such abuses usually disappear, but some events bring them into sharp focus and therefore deserve public scrutiny. Only by drawing attention to concrete abuses can we underscore the precarious condition of cultural workers and the necessity for sustained protest against the appropriation of politically engaged art, culture and theory by institutions embedded in a tight mesh of capital and power.”

Edited by Corina L. Apostol (1-4), Vladan Jeremić (1-4), David Riff (1), Dmitry Vilensky (1), Vlad Morariu (1), Raluca Voinea (2), Brett Alton Bloom (3), and Rena Rädle (4)
Publisher ArtLeaks
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA License

Project website

Issue 1, May 2013: PDF, PDFs
Issue 2, Jun 2014: PDF, PDFs
Issue 3, Aug 2015: PDF, PDFs
Issue 4, Sep 2017: PDF, PDFs