The Tel Quel Reader (1998)

25 April 2018, dusan

“The work of the French literary review, intellectual grouping and publishing team Tel Quel had a profound impact on the formation of literary and cultural debate in the 1960s and 70s. Its legacy has had enormous influence on the parameters of such debate today. From its beginning in 1960 to its closure in 1982, it published some of the earliest work of Jacques Derrida, Julia Kristeva, Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. It was also associated with some of the key ideas of the French avant-garde, publishing key articles by Georges Bataille and Antonin Artaud.

The Tel Quel Reader presents for the first time in English the key essays written by the Tel Quel group. Essays by Julia Kristeva, one of the review’s editor’s Michel Foucault, and a fascinating interview with Roland Barthes are here made available for the first time in English. It provides a unique insight into the post-structuralist movement and presents some of the pioneering essays on literature and culture, film, semiotics and psychoanalysis.”

Edited by Patrick French and Roland-François Lack
Publisher Routledge, London & New York, 1998
ISBN 0415157137, 9780415157131
ix+278 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (14 MB)

John M. MacGregor: The Discovery of the Art of the Insane (1989)

10 February 2017, dusan

“This pioneering work, the first history of the art of the insane, scrutinizes changes in attitudes toward the art of the mentally ill from a time when it was either ignored or ridiculed, through the era when major figures in the art world discovered the extraordinary power of visual statements by psychotic artists such as Adolf Wölfli and Richard Dadd. John MacGregor draws on his dual training in art history and in psychiatry and psychoanalysis to describe not only this evolution in attitudes but also the significant influence of the art of the mentally ill on the development of modern art as a whole. His detailed narrative, with its strangely beautiful illustrations, introduces us to a fascinating group of people that includes the psychotic artists, both trained and untrained, and the psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, critics, and art historians who encountered their work.”

Publisher Princeton University Press, 1989
ISBN 0691040710, 9780691040714
xix+390 pages
via mutewar

Reviews: Aaron H. Esman (Hist Behavioral Sciences), Ellen Handler Spitz (Art Bulletin), Aaron H. Esman (JAPA).

WorldCat

PDF (24 MB)

See also Hans Prinzhorn’s Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922–).

Anselm Franke, Sabine Folie (eds.): Animismus: Moderne hinter den Spiegeln / Animism: Modernity through the Looking Glass (2011) [DE/EN]

15 December 2016, dusan

Animism. Modernity through the Looking Glass takes its cue from the ethnological concept of animism that emerged in the nineteenth century in the context of colonialism in search of a “primal” religion. The term was applied to cultures that view nature and objects as having a soul and a life of their own. This concept borrowed from ethnology also plays a key role in psychoanalysis, where it denotes a mental state in which the inner and outer worlds are not distinct from each other.

The catalogue brings together artworks, documents, and artifacts to create an essayistic visual space that points to the need for a decolonialization and revision of this traditional understanding of animism. The show juxtaposes historical materials such as early attempts to animate technologically reproduced images with contemporary works addressing the line between life and non-life.”

With essays by Sabine Folie, Anselm Franke, Isabelle Stengers, and conversation with Elisabeth von Samsonow by Angela Melitopoulos and Maurizio Lazzarato.

Publisher Generali Foundation, Vienna, and Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne, 2011
ISBN 9783863350703
229 pages
via cblip

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (35 MB)