Virginie Despentes: King Kong Theory (2006–) [EN, ES]

22 April 2018, dusan

“With humor, rage, and confessional detail, Virginie Despentes—in her own words “more King Kong than Kate Moss”—delivers a highly charged account of women’s lives today. She explodes common attitudes about sex and gender, and shows how modern beauty myths are ripe for rebelling against. Using her own experiences of rape, prostitution, and working in the porn industry as a jumping-off point, she makes the bold, stinging point that when it comes to sex today, everyone’s getting screwed.”

First published in French as King Kong théorie, Grasset, 2006.

English edition
Translated by Stéphanie Benson
Publisher The Feminist Press, City University of New York, New York, 2010
ISBN 9781558616578, 1558616578
143 pages

Review: Rebecca Seal (The Guardian, 2009).

Publisher (EN)
WorldCat (EN)

Teoría King Kong (Spanish, trans. Beatriz Preciado, 2007)
King Kong Theory (English, trans. Stéphanie Benson, 2010, HTML)

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality (1982)

13 September 2016, dusan

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality is a conference program booklet designed by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson and published in conjunction with the ninth “Scholar and the Feminist” conference, “Towards a Politics of Sexuality,” held at Barnard College on April 24, 1982. Better known as the Barnard Sex Conference, the conference was a key event in the feminist sex wars of the 1980s. Organized by Carole Vance to explore the politics of sexuality, the conference was picketed by antipornography groups. While these protesters focused their objections on issues of pornography, S/M, and butch/femme, the conference addressed a much wider array of questions about women’s experiences of sexuality, some of which are represented here.

No ordinary conference program, the Diary included Vance’s invitation to presenters, a coauthored “Concept Paper” that described the conference’s aims and guiding questions, a list of speakers and schedule of events, as well as minutes from planning meetings, bibliographies of suggested reading, and a page devoted to each workshop. The Diary was, as Gayle Rubin later wrote, “intended to be something of an archival document.” Each speaker created a page in the Diary to represent her workshop; many of these included a “postcard” featuring some image that she found meaningful personally or in the context of the workshop. These images added to the visual impact of the program. With its striking images, its combination of politics, scholarship, and personal reflection, and its moments of insight, polemic, and humor, the Diary remains a compelling record of feminist collaboration.

In the days leading up to the conference, members of antipornography groups contacted the Barnard administration and issued a warning about what they saw as the “antifeminist” nature of the proceedings. In response, Barnard administrators confiscated 1,500 copies of the Diary two days before the conference. Despite subsequent reprinting, the Diary remains exceedingly rare.” (Heather Love, 2011)

Edited by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson
Publisher Faculty Press, New York, 1982
72 pages
via Dark Matter Archives

Commentary: Carole S. Vance (1984), Gayle Rubin (GLQ 2011).

WorldCat

PDF, PDF (18 MB)
See also conference proceedings (Pleasure and Danger, ed. Carole S. Vance, 1984, 462 pp)

Mario Perniola: The Sex Appeal of the Inorganic: Philosophies of Desire in the Modern World (2000/2004)

3 September 2016, dusan

“We live in a world where the one-time opposition between things and humans has been transformed, where the center of contemporary sensibility is the encounter between philosophy and sexuality, where sex extends well beyond both the act and the body. We live in a world where to be sexy is to ignore the distinctions between animate and inanimate objects of desire, where the aesthetics of sex are being revolutionized.

An organic sexuality, based on sex difference and driven by desire and pleasure, is being replaced by a neutral, inorganic and artificial sexuality, a sexuality always available but indifferent to beauty, age or form, a sexuality freed by thought from nature.

The Sex Appeal of the Inorganic takes the reader on a radical, new tour of Western philosophy-from Descartes, Kant and Hegel to Heidegger, Wittgenstein and Sartre-to reframe our understanding of personal experience and the aesthetic, to examine how, if we are to remember how to feel, we must become a thing who feels, we must think ourselves closer to the inorganic world and move further from our bodies.”

First published as Il sex appeal dell’inorganico, Einaudi, Torino, 2000.

Translated by Massimo Verdicchio
Publisher Continuum, London/New York, 2004
Athlone Contemporary European Thinkers series
ISBN 0826462448
vi+147 pages

Reviews: Stella Sandford (Radical Phil 2004), Farris Wahbeh (J Aesthetics & Art Criticism 2006), Patricia Marino (J Hist Sexuality 2010).
Interview with author (1996-97)

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (7 MB)