Glass Bead, 3: Site 2: Dark Room: Somatic Reason and Synthetic Eros (2019)

26 September 2019, dusan

“This issue, produced in the framework of Okayama Art Summit 2019 (‘IF THE SNAKE’, curated by Pierre Huyghe, September 27 – November 24 2019, Japan), focuses on the concrete conditions of embodied thought. From the assessment of historical attempts at grounding critique in the body to the exploration of contemporary issues surrounding situated knowledge, from the analysis of the aesthetic and political economy at play in the encounter with advanced human-like sex robotics to the ways in which algorithms are transforming our sense of intimate relationships, and from the ways in which cruising practices subvert dominant discourses on architecture and the city to the libidinal economy at work in specific art forms, the contributions gathered in this issue navigate the fault line that articulates erotics and rationality.

‘Site 2. Dark Room: Somatic Reason and Synthetic Eros’ contends that contemporary upheavals concerning love, sex and reproduction are not mere side issues that can be safely dealt with in various already existing discursive regimes (e.g. biology, psychology, identity politics) but crucial transformative vectors for developing a renewed understanding of transdisciplinary reason.

The publication of this issue will be spanned across the duration of the triennial, with one new contribution uploaded every week.

With contributions by Adam Berg (artist, writer), Louis Chude-Sokei (writer), Cruising Pavilion (curatorial collective), Sally Haslanger (philosopher), Anna Longo (philosopher), Alexandra Hedako Mason (researcher), Matthew Poole (writer), Patricia Reed​ (artist, writer), Oli Surel (writer), and Three Billions of Perverts (archival material).”

Publisher Glass Bead, September-November 2019

HTML, PDFs
See also Issue 2

Virginie Despentes: King Kong Theory (2006–) [EN, ES]

22 April 2018, dusan

“With humor, rage, and confessional detail, Virginie Despentes—in her own words “more King Kong than Kate Moss”—delivers a highly charged account of women’s lives today. She explodes common attitudes about sex and gender, and shows how modern beauty myths are ripe for rebelling against. Using her own experiences of rape, prostitution, and working in the porn industry as a jumping-off point, she makes the bold, stinging point that when it comes to sex today, everyone’s getting screwed.”

First published in French as King Kong théorie, Grasset, 2006.

English edition
Translated by Stéphanie Benson
Publisher The Feminist Press, City University of New York, New York, 2010
ISBN 9781558616578, 1558616578
143 pages

Review: Rebecca Seal (The Guardian, 2009).

Publisher (EN)
WorldCat (EN)

Teoría King Kong (Spanish, trans. Beatriz Preciado, 2007)
King Kong Theory (English, trans. Stéphanie Benson, 2010, HTML)

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality (1982)

13 September 2016, dusan

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality is a conference program booklet designed by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson and published in conjunction with the ninth “Scholar and the Feminist” conference, “Towards a Politics of Sexuality,” held at Barnard College on April 24, 1982. Better known as the Barnard Sex Conference, the conference was a key event in the feminist sex wars of the 1980s. Organized by Carole Vance to explore the politics of sexuality, the conference was picketed by antipornography groups. While these protesters focused their objections on issues of pornography, S/M, and butch/femme, the conference addressed a much wider array of questions about women’s experiences of sexuality, some of which are represented here.

No ordinary conference program, the Diary included Vance’s invitation to presenters, a coauthored “Concept Paper” that described the conference’s aims and guiding questions, a list of speakers and schedule of events, as well as minutes from planning meetings, bibliographies of suggested reading, and a page devoted to each workshop. The Diary was, as Gayle Rubin later wrote, “intended to be something of an archival document.” Each speaker created a page in the Diary to represent her workshop; many of these included a “postcard” featuring some image that she found meaningful personally or in the context of the workshop. These images added to the visual impact of the program. With its striking images, its combination of politics, scholarship, and personal reflection, and its moments of insight, polemic, and humor, the Diary remains a compelling record of feminist collaboration.

In the days leading up to the conference, members of antipornography groups contacted the Barnard administration and issued a warning about what they saw as the “antifeminist” nature of the proceedings. In response, Barnard administrators confiscated 1,500 copies of the Diary two days before the conference. Despite subsequent reprinting, the Diary remains exceedingly rare.” (Heather Love, 2011)

Edited by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson
Publisher Faculty Press, New York, 1982
72 pages
via Dark Matter Archives

Commentary: Carole S. Vance (1984), Gayle Rubin (GLQ 2011).

WorldCat

PDF, PDF (18 MB)
See also conference proceedings (Pleasure and Danger, ed. Carole S. Vance, 1984, 462 pp)