Morgan Meyer

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Morgan Meyer obtained a European Masters in Science, Technology and Society from the University of Oslo and the University Louis Pasteur in 2002 and a Masters in Cellular Biology and Animal Physiology from the University of Montpellier in 2000. He served at the University of Sheffield Department of Sociological Studies (as a PhD student from 2002 to 2006, a teaching assistant from 2005 to 2006 and a postdoc from 2007 to 2008), and in February 2009 he joined the Center for the Sociology of Innovation.

His current research project explores the practice of knowledge brokering. Knowledge brokers can be understood as actors that facilitate the production, the sharing and the use of knowledge. The starting point is that knowledge brokering tends to happen in particular locations - spaces that privilege the translation and movement of scientific knowledge across boundaries, such as science shops, university technology transfer offices, or foresight exercises. He is analysing three related dimensions of knowledge brokering: the specific spaces in which it takes place, the specific roles and identities of the people involved, and the latter’s day-to-day practices.

In his PhD Morgan explored the co-production of knowledge by amateurs and professionals in a museum of natural history, paying particular attention to the making and unmaking of the boundaries of science. Thereafter he worked for the EU FP6 project "Knowledge, Institutions and Gender" which examined the production of knowledge contexts and cultures, including the role of gender, from an "East-West" perspective.

His research interests are: sociology and geography of science; boundaries and boundary-work; actor-network theory; epistemic communities; museum studies; science and culture in Luxembourg. He also occasionally works as a consultant for the National Research Fund of Luxembourg and he regularly writes popular articles (mainly for the Chronicle of Higher Education and the Lëtzebuerger Land).


http://www.csi.ensmp.fr/index.php?page=EMembres&lang=en&IdM=46