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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed listings see the Log, Recent, Contents and Index sections. Selected updates are posted on RSS, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

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Monoskop Log

Vojin Bakić (2008)

This publication has been released on the occasion of the “Vojin Bakić” exhibition at the Grazer Kunstverein, curated by the Croatian collective WHW (What, How & for Whom) and Ana Bakić. Vojin Bakić (1915-1992) was a Yugoslav-Croat sculptor and architect. The book contains black-and-white illustrations and texts on the artist’s life and work by WHW and Milan Prelog, as well as an interview with Jerko Denegri on the work of Bakić.

Edited by What, How and for Whom/WHW
Publisher What, How and for Whom/WHW, Zagreb, and Grazer Kunstverein, Graz, 2008
61 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF (23 MB)

Jerzy Ludwiński: Notes from the Future of Art: Selected Writings (2007)

“This book is the first collection of texts by Jerzy Ludwiński (1930-2000) published in English. Ludwiński was an art historian, critic, curator, founder of the Mona Lisa Gallery and professor in the Academy of Fine Arts. He fulfilled those functions on the peripheries of the state system of his time, activating, in turn, the cultural circles in Lublin, Wrocław, Toruń and Poznań. Within the frames of artistic life established by the authorities of the People’s Republic of Poland, he marked out his own ‘playing field’, where such notions as ‘critic’, ‘curator’, ‘gallery’ and ‘museum’ underwent significant transformation. The models of cultural institutions, created by Ludwiński at the end of the 1960s – Museum of Current Art, Mona Lisa Gallery and Centre for Artistic Research – became not only the places of a particular reflection on art, but also an institutional shelter for the first manifestations of conceptual art in Poland.”

Edited by Magdalena Ziółkowska
Publisher Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, and Veenman Publishers, Rotterdam, 2007
VAMPR series, 1
ISBN 9789070149949, 9070149949
239 pages
via editor

Review: Piotr Słodkowski (ArtMargins, 2012).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (8 MB)
Academia.edu

Andrea Andersson (ed.): Postscript: Writing After Conceptual Art (2018)

“One of the most important movements in twenty-first century literature is the emergence of conceptual writing. By knowingly drawing on the histories of art and literature, conceptual writing upended traditional categorical conventions.

Postscript is the first collection of writings on the subject of conceptual writing by a diverse field of scholars in the realms of art, literature, media, as well as the artists themselves. Using new and old technology, and textual and visual modes including appropriation, transcription, translation, redaction, and repetition, the contributors actively challenge the existing scholarship on conceptual art. Rather than segregating the work of visual artists from that of writers we are shown the ways in which conceptual art is, and remains, a mutually supportive interaction between the arts.”

Publisher University of Toronto Press, 2018
ISBN 1442649844, 9781442649842
xii+416 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (26 MB)

Pictures to be Read, Poetry to be Seen (1967)

“Both an inaugural event in the foundation of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and as an early marker of its experimental ethos, the MCA’s first formal gallery exhibition, Pictures to be Read/Poetry to be Seen, brought together artists who probed the permeable spaces between pictorial images, linguistic representation, artistic practice and lived experience. As a guiding, yet loose, theme for the exhibition, founding director Jan van der Marck chose works that attempted to break down the medium-specificity of traditional artistic categories. In many instances, this was achieved through a conflation of various codes and signifiers from different modes of linguistic and visual production (like poetics, graphic design, and performance) and the modes of perception they supposedly required (such as reading, seeing and participation).”

Pictures to be Read/Poetry to be Seen featured 71 works created between 1961–67 by artists, including Shusaku Arakawa, Giafranco Baruchello, Mary Bauermeister, George Brecht, Oyvind Fahlström, Ray Johnson, Allan Kaprow, R. B. Kitaj, Alison Knowles, Jim Nutt, Gianni-Emilio Simonetti, and Wolf Vostell.

Curated, with an introductory essay and notes on the artists, by Jan van der Marck
Publisher Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 1967
[33] pages
via laboratoirefig.fr

Exhibition
WorldCat

PDF (4 MB)

Tom Marioni: Beer, Art and Philosophy (The Exhibition), 1968-2006 (2006)

Tom Marioni: Beer, Art, and Philosophy (The Exhibition), 1968–2006 surveys nearly forty years of the artist’s engagement with experience as art. Born in Cincinnati in 1937, Marioni studied drawing, sculpture, and printmaking at the Cincinnati Art Academy, and in 1959 moved to San Francisco where he began to experiment with performance, sound, the sense of taste, and other non-traditional media.

A pioneer of the West Coast Conceptual Art movement, Marioni drew inspiration from artists such as Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), John Cage (1912–1992), and Joseph Beuys (1921–1986), all of whom challenged the conventions of art. Emphasizing ideas as material for art, these artists exercised a profound influence on Marioni and other conceptual artists of the 1960’s. In 1968, Marioni became a curator at the Bay Area’s Richmond Art Center, where he mounted a series of ambitious Conceptual Art shows. In 1970, he founded the Museum of Conceptual Art in San Francisco, where he continued to experiment, viewing the concept of the museum as an extension of his work, until he closed it in 1984.

Following in the tradition of the “readymade”—Duchamp’s name for common or found objects, which he recontextualized as art—Marioni employed mundane substances such as beer, elevating its significance from a common means of socialization to a catalyst for creative expression and social interaction. This meant that drinking beer with friends could be as profound an experience as gazing at the Mona Lisa. Thus, in Marioni’s view, the act of communication itself takes on aesthetic significance. Like Cage, whose work highlighted chance and ordinary sounds as music, Marioni attempts to make art that is as close to everyday life as possible without becoming life itself. Similar to Beuys, who privileged creative action over the precious and static art object, Marioni’s conversations and gatherings expand the conventions of painting and sculpture.”

Foreword by Linda Shearer
Publisher Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2006
ISBN 9780917562778, 0917562771
68 pages

Exhibition
WorldCat

PDF, PDF