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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed overview see the Recent, Contents, Index and Media library sections. Updates are also being posted on Twitter and Facebook.

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The works of Gilles Deleuze (1925-95) and Félix Guattari (1930-92).






Monoskop Log

Branislav Jakovljević: Alienation Effects: Performance and Self-Management in Yugoslavia, 1945-91 (2016)

“In the 1970s, Yugoslavia emerged as a dynamic environment for conceptual and performance art. At the same time, it pursued its own form of political economy of socialist self-management. Alienation Effects argues that a deep relationship existed between the democratization of the arts and industrial democracy, resulting in a culture difficult to classify. The book challenges the assumption that the art emerging in Eastern Europe before 1989 was either “official” or “dissident” art, and shows that the break up of Yugoslavia was not a result of “ancient hatreds” among its peoples but instead came from the distortion and defeat of the idea of self-management.

The case studies include mass performances organized during state holidays; proto-performance art, such as the 1954 production of Waiting for Godot in a former concentration camp in Belgrade; student demonstrations in 1968; and body art pieces by Gina Pane, Joseph Beuys, Marina Abramovic, and others. Alienation Effects sheds new light on the work of well-known artists and scholars, including early experimental poetry by Slavoj Žižek, as well as performance and conceptual artists that deserve wider, international attention.”

Publisher University of Michigan Press, 2016
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND License
ISBN 9780472900589
xii+369 pages

Review: Aleksandra Jovićević (Peščanik).

Publisher
OAPEN
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (3 MB)
Images, PDF (HathiTrust)
PDF chapters (Jstor)

John M. MacGregor: The Discovery of the Art of the Insane (1989)

“This pioneering work, the first history of the art of the insane, scrutinizes changes in attitudes toward the art of the mentally ill from a time when it was either ignored or ridiculed, through the era when major figures in the art world discovered the extraordinary power of visual statements by psychotic artists such as Adolf Wölfli and Richard Dadd. John MacGregor draws on his dual training in art history and in psychiatry and psychoanalysis to describe not only this evolution in attitudes but also the significant influence of the art of the mentally ill on the development of modern art as a whole. His detailed narrative, with its strangely beautiful illustrations, introduces us to a fascinating group of people that includes the psychotic artists, both trained and untrained, and the psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, critics, and art historians who encountered their work.”

Publisher Princeton University Press, 1989
ISBN 0691040710, 9780691040714
xix+390 pages
via mutewar

Reviews: Aaron H. Esman (Hist Behavioral Sciences), Ellen Handler Spitz (Art Bulletin), Aaron H. Esman (JAPA).

WorldCat

PDF (24 MB)

See also Hans Prinzhorn’s Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922–).

After Us: Art—Science—Politics, 2 (2016)

“Through essays, pictorials and fiction, After Us hopes to look beyond the horizon, exploring developments in science and technology, new forms and expressions in art, and alternative political thinking. In print and online.”

Contents: Essays by Claire Colebrook on man and the apocalypse, Jennifer Boyd on explosions and their motifs, Peter Wessel Zapffe on the tragedy of intellect. Interview with Patrik Schumacher by Martti Kalliala. Fiction by Amy Ireland. Art by Daniela Yohannes, Laurel Halo, Mari Matsutoya & LaTurbo Avedon. Graphic fiction by Lando. Illustrations by Dave Gaskarth, Rich Foster, Patrick Savile and featuring the work of Alice Channer, Quayola, Zaha Hadid.

Publisher Optigram, London, Nov 2016
40 pages

HTML (English, use menu to browse contents)

Helen Pritchard, Eric Snodgrass, Magda Tyźlik-Carver (eds.): Executing Practices (2017)

“This collection brings together artists, curators, programmers, theorists and heavy internet browsers whose practices make critical intervention into the broad concept of execution. It draws attention to their political strategies, asking: who and what is involved with those practices, and for whom or what are these practices performed, and how? From the contestable politics of emoji modifier mechanisms and micro-temporalities of computational processes to genomic exploitation and the curating of digital content, the chapters account for gendered, racialised, spatial, violent, erotic, artistic and other embedded forms of execution. Together they highlight a range of ways in which execution emerges and how it participates within networked forms of liveliness.”

Contributors: Roel Roscam Abbing, Geoff Cox, Olle Esvik, Jennifer Gabrys, Franciso Gallardo, David Gauthier, Linda Hilfling Ritasdatter, Brian House, Yuk Hui, Marie Louise Juul Søndergaard, Peggy Pierrot, Andy Prior, Helen Pritchard, Audrey Samson, Kasper Hedegård Shiølin, Susan Schuppli, Femke Snelting, Eric Snodgrass, Winnie Soon, Magda Tyżlik-Carver.

Publisher Autonomedia, New York, 2017
Data Browser series, 6
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 Unported License
ISBN 9781570273216
279 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF (24 MB)

Radical Light: Alternative Film and Video in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1945-2000 (2010)

“This kaleidoscopic collection of essays, interviews, photographs, and artist-designed pages chronicles the vibrant and influential history of experimental cinema in the San Francisco Bay Area. Encompassing historical, cultural, and aesthetic realms, Radical Light features critical analyses of films and videos, reminiscences from artists, and interviews with pioneering filmmakers, curators, and archivists. It explores artistic movements, film and video exhibition and distribution, artists’ groups, and Bay Area film schools. Special sections of ephemera—posters, correspondence, photographs, newsletters, program notes, and more—punctuate the pages of Radical Light, giving a first-hand visual sense of the period. This groundbreaking, hybrid assemblage reveals a complex picture of how and why the San Francisco Bay Region, a laboratory for artistic and technical innovation for more than half a century, has become a global center of vanguard film, video, and new media.

Among the contributors are Rebecca Solnit and Ernie Gehr on Bay Area cinema’s roots in the work of Eadweard Muybridge and others; Scott MacDonald on Art in Cinema; P. Adams Sitney on films by James Broughton and Sidney Peterson; Stan Brakhage, Bruce Conner, Lawrence Jordan, and Yvonne Rainer on the Bay Area film scene in the 1950s; J. Hobeman on films by Christopher Maclaine, Bruce Conner, and Robert Nelson; Craig Baldwin on found footage film; George Kuchar on student-produced melodramas; Michael Wallin on queer film in the 1970s; V. Vale on punk cinema; Dale Hoyt and Cecilia Dougherty on video in the 1980s and 1990s; and Maggie Morse on new media as sculpture.”

Edited by Steve Anker, Kathy Geritz and Steve Seid
Publisher University of California Press, and Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley, 2010
ISBN 9780520249103, 0520249100
352 pages

Reviews: Molly H.Cox (Other Cinema, 2011), Lucy Raven (BOMB, 2011), Federico Windhausen (Moving Image, 2012), Mike Leggett (Leonardo, 2012).

Exhibition
Publisher (BAMPFA)
Publisher (UC Press)
WorldCat

multiple formats (on Internet Archive)
PDF (35 MB)