Rolf Aamot

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Born September 28, 1934(1934-09-28)
Bergen, Norway

Rolf Aamot (born 1934) is a Norwegian painter, graphic artist, film director, photographer and tonal-image composer. His is one of the pioneers of audio-visual art in Scandinavia. Since the 1950s, Aamot has been a pioneer within the field of electronic painting, exploring the emerging technology as it combines with the traditional arts of painting, music, film, theatre, and ballet. Much of his work consists of creating electronic tonal images; frequently in a form of performance art with abstract photographic elements.

From early age, he was taught after Bauhaus principles by his father Randulf Aamot, a master carpenter and wood carver. In 1952, he had his first solo exhibition of paintings at the Paus Knudsen Gallery in Bergen. In 1953, at the age of 18, while still attending the Norwegian National Academy of Craft and Art Industry in Oslo, he was awarded a major public commission for the Natural History Museum at the University of Oslo. From 1957 until 1960 he studied at the Norwegian National Academy of Fine Arts with the painters such as Aage Storstein and Alexander Schultz, both of them anchored in the effort to combine figuration and abstraction typical of the 1920s. He later studied Film at Dramatiska Institutet in Stockholm.

Aamot's electronic tonal-image work Evolution (1966) with music by Arne Nordheim was shown on Norwegian television in 1967.[1][2] Evolution represented a milestone of a new art form in which television for the first time was used as an independent picture-artistic means of expression. Throughout the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s Aamot created a series of works for television.

From the latter half of the 1980s, he worked with computer paintings on canvas, digital photopaintings and graphic art. He has continued to make video and film art, often in collaboration with the painter and composer Bjørg Lødøen and the photographer, dancer and choreographer Kristin Lodoen Linder.

Since 1966, Aamot's works have been shown in Scandinavia, France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, the Soviet Union and subsequently Russia, Poland, USA and Japan. His work can be found in several public collections. Aamot has been represented at several international film and art festivals throughout the world.

Works[edit]

Television[edit]

  • Evolusjon [Evolution], with electronic music by Arne Nordheim (first presented in 1966; TV-broadcasted on 28 May 1967) [3];
  • Relieff, with electronic music by Bjørn Fongaard and choreography by Edith Roger (21 April 1968) [4]
  • BSK (1968)
  • Visuelt [Visual] (1971). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Progress (1977). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Puls (1986). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Medusa - hun som ser (1986). A composition by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot. Directed by Aamot, cast: Lødøen.
  • Utdrivelsen [Expulsion] (1987)
  • Nærklang (1987)
  • Drømmen er der alltid [The Dream is Always There] (1988)

Film[edit]

  • Relieff (1966–67)
  • Kinetisk Energi [Kinetic Energy] (1967–68). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Vision - en film om Gustav Vigeland (1969). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Strukturer [Structures] (1970). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Actio (1980). Music by Rolf Aamot. Recorded and produced by Bjørg Lødøen and Rolf Aamot.
  • Nordlys [Northern Lights] (1991). With Bjørg Lødøen.
  • Tid-e-vann (1997-2000). With Kristin Linder.
  • Energi [Energy] (2003). With Bjørg Lødøen.
  • U (2005)
  • Ir (2006)
  • Wirr (2008)
  • Contra (2009)
  • X (2010)
  • W (2011)
  • RRR (2012)

Music[edit]

  • Rolf Aamot, Tonal Image Films 1968-1991, Prisma Records, CD, 2011. Works: Actio, 1980; Kinetisk Energi Part 1 & 2, 1968; Nordlys, 1991; Progress, 1972; Viisuelt, 1971. The disc contains audio part to Aamot's tonal image films. The music consists of abstract sounds and movements from different electronic sources, interacting with pre-recorded and prepared acoustic instruments and human voices. [5], [6].

See also[edit]

Links[edit]