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google street[edit]

cbll=lat,lng; z=zoom; cbp=x,yaw,x,zoom,pitch

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Nederland&hl=en&ll=51.918345,4.474354&spn=0.008444,0.01929&sll=48.145329,17.111217&sspn=0.001142,0.002411&oq=Karel+Doormanhof+45&hnear=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Zuid-Holland,+The+Netherlands&t=m&z=16&layer=c&cbll=51.918247,4.474387&panoid=CYD94kZwgx3ql_j0N_0XRA&cbp=12,47.13,,0,1.99

RSS[edit]

Jens Eder, Charlotte Klonk (eds.): Image Operations: Visual Media and Political Conflict (2016)

“Still and moving images are crucial factors in contemporary political conflicts. They not only have representational, expressive or illustrative functions, but also augment and create significant events. Beyond altering states of mind, they affect bodies and often life or death is at stake. Various forms of image operations are currently performed in the contexts of war, insurgency and activism. Photographs, videos, interactive simulations and other kinds of images steer drones to their targets, train soldiers, terrorise the public, celebrate protest icons, uncover injustices, or call for help. They are often parts of complex agential networks and move across different media and cultural environments. This book is a pioneering interdisciplinary study of the role and function of images in political life. Balancing theoretical reflections with in-depth case studies, it brings together renowned scholars and activists from different fields to offer a multifaceted critical perspective on a crucial aspect of contemporary visual culture.”

Publisher Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2016
ISBN 9781526107213, 152610721X
xv+232+[24] pages

Review: Zoya Brumberg (Journal of Visual Culture, 2018).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (21 MB)

Kareem Estefan, Carin Kuoni, Laura Raicovich (eds.): Assuming Boycott: Resistance, Agency, and Cultural Production (2017)

“Boycott and divestment are essential tools for activists around the globe. Today’s organizers target museums, universities, corporations, and governments to curtail unethical sources of profit, discriminatory practices, or human rights violations. They leverage cultural production – and challenge its institutional supports – helping transform situations in the name of social justice.

The refusal to participate in an oppressive system has long been one of the most powerful weapons in the organizer’s arsenal. Since the days of the 19th century Irish land wars, when Irish tenant farmers defied the actions of Captain Charles Boycott and English landlords, “boycott” has been a method that’s shown its effectiveness time and again. In the 20th century, it notably played central roles in the liberation of India and South Africa and the struggle for civil rights in the U.S.: the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott is generally seen as a turning point in the movement against segregation.

Assuming Boycott is the essential reader for today’s creative leaders and cultural practitioners, including original contributions by artists, scholars, activists, critics, curators and writers who examine the historical precedent of South Africa; the current cultural boycott of Israel; freedom of speech and self-censorship; and long-distance activism. Far from withdrawal or cynicism, boycott emerges as a productive tool of creative and productive engagement.

Including essays by Nasser Abourahme, Ariella Azoulay, Tania Bruguera, Noura Erakat, Kareem Estefan, Mariam Ghani with Haig Aivazian, Nathan Gray and Ahmet Öğüt, Chelsea Haines, Sean Jacobs, Yazan Khalili, Carin Kuoni and Laura Raicovich, Svetlana Mintcheva, Naeem Mohaiemen, Hlonipha Mokoena, John Peffer, Joshua Simon, Ann Laura Stoler, Radhika Subramaniam, Eyal Weizman and Kareem Estefan, and Frank B. Wilderson III.”

Publisher OR Books, New York, 2017
ISBN 9781944869434, 1944869433
276 pages

Reviews: Rebecca Wolff (H-AMCA, 2018), Kim Jensen (Mondoweiss, 2017), Marguerite Dabaie (Electronic Intifada, 2017), Robert Bryan (Tribes, 2017).

Series of seminars (Vera List Center, 2015, with videos)
Book launch (New School, 2017, with video)

Editor
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF
EPUB

oneacre.online (2017–)

oneacre.online is an experimental publishing and distribution project that utilises an online platform to seed unprintable text-based works by emerging artists. The project explores the possibilities of hyper-publishing in a series of commissioned publications. Thematically the first four place themselves in the online world of constant updates and refresh buttons that, as theorist Wendy Chun observes, “exist at the bleeding edge of obsolescence. We thus forever try to catch up, updating to remain the same”. The publications use the omnidirectional online terrain and actions that are native to it — such as refreshing, instantly available to edit, easily erasable, highlighting, copy-pasting and non linear navigation — to explore and critically evaluate visions and versions of power systems by tracing the politics of technological infrastructures. Hidden in places as traditional as archives, as often used as smart phone applications, omnipresent and inescapable as the financial market and as quiet and evasive as the transfer of information in narrative structures.

The series showcased in December 2017 Poetics and Politics of Erasure by Yun Ingrid Eel, a multidisciplinary research paper on the aesthetics and politics of erasure. In March 2018, Artificial Intelligence Never Has a Headache by Karina Zavidova, a long-form about the fear of AI spread by the media, and the market of productivity-enhancing tools it has fuelled. In July 2018 Radio, Techno, Fossil by Eline Benjaminsen & Sophie Dyer, the story of a radio-image as it traverses the bounds of the Earth’s surfaces, atmospheres and techno-geographies. And in September 2018, Meaning Seeking Animals by Lisa van Casand, a subjective collection of a wide range of perspectives on the transfer of information.”

Made by Stef Kors, Titus Knegtel, Victoria Douka-Doukopoulou
Published 2017-2018

HTML (limited preview; use the direct links above to access publications)

Mark Fisher: Postcapitalist Desire: The Final Lectures (2020)

“This collection of lecture notes and transcriptions reveals acclaimed writer and blogger Mark Fisher in his element — the classroom — outlining a project that Fisher’s death left unfinished.

Beginning with that most fundamental of questions — “Do we really want what we say we want?” — Fisher explores the relationship between desire and capitalism, and wonders what new forms of desire we might still excavate from the past, present, and future. From the emergence and failure of the counterculture in the 1970s to the continued development of his left-accelerationist line of thinking, this volume charts a tragically interrupted course for thinking about the raising of a new kind of consciousness, and the cultural and political implications of doing so.

For Fisher, this process of consciousness raising was always, fundamentally, psychedelic — just not in the way that we might think.”

Edited and with an introduction by Matt Colquhoun
Publisher Repeater Books, London, 2020
ISBN 9781913462376

Publisher

PDF

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"I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

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two

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

three

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

four

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

five

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

twitter[edit]

infobox book[edit]

Soundings
Author Suzanne Delehanty
Publisher Neuberger Museum/State University of New York
City Purchase, NY
Year 1981
Pages 96
Format 21 x 14.85 cm
Fabrication Risograph
E-book PDF

monoskop log category listing[edit]

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1&count=40

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&feed=rss2&count=40

oneacre.online (2017–)

oneacre.online is an experimental publishing and distribution project that utilises an online platform to seed unprintable text-based works by emerging artists. The project explores the possibilities of hyper-publishing in a series of commissioned publications. Thematically the first four place themselves in the online world of constant updates and refresh buttons that, as theorist Wendy Chun observes, “exist at the bleeding edge of obsolescence. We thus forever try to catch up, updating to remain the same”. The publications use the omnidirectional online terrain and actions that are native to it — such as refreshing, instantly available to edit, easily erasable, highlighting, copy-pasting and non linear navigation — to explore and critically evaluate visions and versions of power systems by tracing the politics of technological infrastructures. Hidden in places as traditional as archives, as often used as smart phone applications, omnipresent and inescapable as the financial market and as quiet and evasive as the transfer of information in narrative structures.

The series showcased in December 2017 Poetics and Politics of Erasure by Yun Ingrid Eel, a multidisciplinary research paper on the aesthetics and politics of erasure. In March 2018, Artificial Intelligence Never Has a Headache by Karina Zavidova, a long-form about the fear of AI spread by the media, and the market of productivity-enhancing tools it has fuelled. In July 2018 Radio, Techno, Fossil by Eline Benjaminsen & Sophie Dyer, the story of a radio-image as it traverses the bounds of the Earth’s surfaces, atmospheres and techno-geographies. And in September 2018, Meaning Seeking Animals by Lisa van Casand, a subjective collection of a wide range of perspectives on the transfer of information.”

Made by Stef Kors, Titus Knegtel, Victoria Douka-Doukopoulou
Published 2017-2018

HTML (limited preview; use the direct links above to access publications)

Richard Avedon, James Baldwin: Nothing Personal (1964)

A book about the state of life in America. Photographs by Richard Avedon and text by James Baldwin.

First published by Atheneum, New York, 1964; and C. H. Bucher, Lucerne, 1964
This edition, Publisher Dell Publishing, New York, 1965
[88] pages
via Kelli Anderson

Interview with Hilton Als (Antwaun Sargent, Galerie, 2017).
Commentary: Hilton Als (New Yorker, 2017).
Reviews: Brian Willis (Aperture, 2016), Steven W Thrasher (Guardian, 2017), Buzz Poole (LA Review of Books, 2018), Carmen Merport (LA Review of Books, 2018).

WorldCat

PDF (9 MB)
JPGs
Reprint of Baldwin’s text

John Cage: A Mycological Foray – Variations on Mushrooms, 2 vols. (1972/2020)

John Cage: A Mycological Foray draws readers across the idiosyncratic, mushroom-suffused, innermost landscape of celebrated American composer John Cage. Upon the remarkable journey with Cage, one encounters assorted photographs, compositions, and contemplations; all in the very same unexpected fashion one encounters various flora and fungi species while mushroom foraging.

Volume I encompasses Cage’s mycological-oriented Indeterminacy stories, Diary excerpts, and essays; and the complete transcript of Cage’s 1983 performance, MUSHROOMS et Variationes.”

Volume II offers the inaugural reproduction of Cage’s 1972 portfolio, Mushroom Book, printed in 1972 in the limited run of 75 copies. The book is a study of fifteen different species of mushrooms, and each folio includes Cage’s poetry, sketches, and drawings (placed on the page by chance operations); scientific information about the mushrooms by Alexander H. Smith; and botanical illustrations by Lois Long.

John Cage: A Mycological Foray is developed in collaboration with the John Cage Trust.

With essay by Kingston Trinder and texts by Isabelle Bucklow.

Edited by Ananda Pellerin
Publisher Atelier Éditions, New York, 2020
ISBN 1733622004, 9781733622004
224 pages
via Alexandra Fanning, HT Georges Vantongerloo

Publisher

PDF (watermarked file from publisher’s Dropbox, contains both volumes; no longer available as of 2 July 2020)