Sandbox

From Monoskop
(Redirected from Test)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

google street[edit]

cbll=lat,lng; z=zoom; cbp=x,yaw,x,zoom,pitch

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Nederland&hl=en&ll=51.918345,4.474354&spn=0.008444,0.01929&sll=48.145329,17.111217&sspn=0.001142,0.002411&oq=Karel+Doormanhof+45&hnear=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Zuid-Holland,+The+Netherlands&t=m&z=16&layer=c&cbll=51.918247,4.474387&panoid=CYD94kZwgx3ql_j0N_0XRA&cbp=12,47.13,,0,1.99

RSS[edit]

Catherine Flood, Gavin Grindon (eds.): Disobedient Objects (2014)

“This book explores the material culture of radical change and protest – from objects familiar to many, such as banners or posters, to the more militant, cunning or technologically cutting-edge, including lock-ons, book-blocs and activist robots. Focusing on social movements since 1980, the book features an introductory essay by the curators examining the history of objects in protest and activism, followed by six essays that look at particular objects, and the contexts in which they are used. It demonstrates how political activism drives a wealth of design ingenuity and collective creativity that defy standard definitions of art and design. Accompanies the V&A exhibition Disobedient Objects, July 2014 to February 2015.”

With essays by Mark Traugott, Anna Feigenbaum, Francesco Raparelli, David Graeber, Nicholas Thoburn, and Ana Longoni.

Publisher V&A Publishing, London, 2014
ISBN 9781851777976, 1851777970
144 pages

Exh. review: Richard Taws (West 86th, 2014).
Book review: Thomas Snow (Object, 2015).

Exhibition
Exhibition blog
WorldCat

PDF (63 MB)

Antipode (ed.): Keywords in Radical Geography: Antipode at 50 (2019)

“To celebrate Antipode’s 50th anniversary, we’ve brought together 50 short keyword essays by a range of scholars at varying career stages who all, in some way, have some kind of affinity with Antipode’s radical geographical project.

The entries in this volume are diverse, eclectic, and to an extent random, however they all speak to our discipline’s past, present and future in exciting and suggestive ways. Contributors have taken unusual or novel terms, concepts or sets of ideas important to their research, and their essays discuss them in relation to radical and critical geography’s histories, current condition and possible future directions. This fractal, playful and provocative intervention in the field stands as a fitting testimony to the role that Antipode has played in the generation of radical geographical engagement with the world.”

Edited by the Antipode Editorial Collective: Tariq Jazeel, Andy Kent, Katherine McKittrick, Nik Theodore, Sharad Chari, Paul Chatterton, Vinay Gidwani, Nik Heynen, Wendy Larner, Jamie Peck, Jenny Pickerill, Marion Werner and Melissa W. Wright.

Publisher Wiley Blackwell, Hoboken, NJ, 2019
Open access
ISBN 9781119558156, 1119558158
279 pages

Editors
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF
PDFs

Sylvia Wynter: Black Metamorphosis: New Natives in a New World [1970s]

Black Metamorphosis: New Natives in a New World is an unpublished manuscript written by Sylvia Wynter. The work is a seminal piece in Black Studies and uses diverse fields to explain Black experiences and presence in the Americas.

Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, Wynter worked with the Center for Afro-American Studies (CAAS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to complete the project which was to be published by the Institute of the Black World. The manuscript presents early iterations of Wynter’s Theory of the Human and explores how Black experiences are essential to understanding the history of the New World.”

The only part of this manuscript that has been published is Wynter’s 1979 essay “Sambos and Minstrels”, though excerpts of and allusions to many of the other texts she wrote in the 1970s can be found in the manuscript, particularly “Jonkonnu in Jamaica” (1970), “Novel and History” (1971), “Ethno or Socio Poetics” (1976), “The Politics of Black Culture” (1977), and “In Quest of Matthew Bondman” (1981). … In the final 935-page manuscript, the page numbers break at page 251 and resume with page 370. The 120 missing pages correspond exactly to the number of pages in a series of descriptions of revolts by enslaved persons in Jamaica, and it appears that they were meant to be inserted at this point in the text.” (Kamugisha 2016)

Manuscript, written throughout the 1970s
[935] pages (252-369 missing)

Commentary and analysis: Derrick White (C.L.R. James Journal, 2010), Aaron Kamugisha, Demetrius L. Eudell, Greg Thomas, Katherine McKittrick, Tonya Haynes, Nijah Cunningham (Small Axe, 2016).

Wikipedia

PDF (21 MB)

Jonas Staal: Propaganda Art in the 21st Century (2019)

“Propaganda art—whether a depiction of joyous workers in the style of socialist realism or a film directed by Steve Bannon—delivers a message. But, as Jonas Staal argues, propaganda does not merely make a political point; it aims to construct reality itself. Political regimes have shaped our world according to their interests and ideology; today, popular mass movements push back by constructing other worlds with their own propagandas.

Staal shows that propaganda is not a relic of a totalitarian past but occurs today even in liberal democracies. He considers different historical forms of propaganda art, from avant-garde to totalitarian and modernist, and he investigates the us versus them dichotomy promoted in War on Terror propaganda art—describing, among other things, a fictional scenario from the Department of Homeland Security, acted out in real time, and military training via videogame. He discusses artistic and cultural productions developed by such popular mass movements of the twenty-first century as the Occupy, activism by and in support of undocumented migrants and refugees, and struggles for liberation in such countries as Mali and Syria.

Staal proposes a new model of emancipatory propaganda art—one that acknowledges the relation between art and power and takes both an aesthetic and a political position in the practice of world-making.”

Publisher MIT Press, September 2019
ISBN 9780262042802, 0262042800
230 pages

Interview with author: Pierre d’Alancaisez (New Books Network, 2021, podcast).

Reviews: Christoph Chwatal (Third Text, 2020), Hailey Maxwell (The Drouth, 2020), Joerg Bader (Critique d’art, 2019, FR).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (12 MB)

html5 video[edit]

headline in italic[edit]

headline[edit]

indent[edit]

"I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

sortable table[edit]

x y
a 10
b 19
c 8

columns[edit]

  • a
  • b
  • c
  • d
  • e
  • f
  • g

grid[edit]

one

  • one
  • two
  • three

two

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

three

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

four

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

five

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

twitter[edit]

infobox book[edit]

Soundings
Author Suzanne Delehanty
Publisher Neuberger Museum/State University of New York
City Purchase, NY
Year 1981
Pages 96
Format 21 x 14.85 cm
Fabrication Risograph
E-book PDF

monoskop log category listing[edit]

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1&count=40

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&feed=rss2&count=40

Henry Flynt: Blueprint for a Higher Civilization (1975)

Book collects the artist’s early philosophical writings on concept art (Flynt coined the term in 1961) and cognitive nihilism. Includes photographs by Jack Smith and Tony Conrad of Flynt’s anti-art demonstrations against MoMA and the Lincoln Center in 1963.

Edited by Germano Celant
Publisher Multhipla, Milan, October 1975
206 pages
via Nourathar

WorldCat

PDF (28 MB, broken link has been fixed on 2021-2-1)

Adam Pendleton: Black Dada: What Can Black Dada Do for Me Do for Me Black Dada, a Reader (2017)

Black Dada Reader is a collection of texts and documents that elucidates “Black Dada,” a term that acclaimed New York–based artist Adam Pendleton (born 1984) uses to define his artistic output. The Reader brings a diverse range of cultural figures into a shared conceptual space, including Hugo Ball, W.E.B. Du Bois, Stokely Carmichael, LeRoi Jones, Sun Ra, Adrian Piper, Joan Retallack, Harryette Mullen, Ron Silliman and Gertrude Stein, as well as artists from different generations such as Ad Reinhardt, Joan Jonas, William Pope.L, Thomas Hirschhorn and Stan Douglas. The Reader also includes essays on the concept of Black Dada and its historical implications from curators and critics including Adrienne Edwards (Walker Arts Center / Performa), Laura Hoptman (MoMA), Tom McDonough (Binghamton), Jenny Schlenzka (PS122) and Susan Thompson (Guggenheim).”

Edited by Stephen Squibb
Publisher Koenig Books, London, 2017
ISBN 9783960981053, 3960981058
331 pages
via tilda

Interviews with author: Jess Wilcox (Art in America, 2009), Karlynne Ejercito (Artforum, 2016), Awa Konaté (Third Text, 2020).

Reviews: Yaniya Lee (Flash Art, 2017), Terence Trouillot (ArtNet, 2017), Robin Pogrebin (New York Times, 2018).

WorldCat

PDF (64 MB)

Tom Johnson: Imaginary Music (1974/2001)

“104 drawings with music notation symbols, many of which have been reprinted in magazines and as program covers. Perhaps the best known is the Celestial Music for Imaginary Trumpets, which ascends 103 ledger lines above the treble clef. Originally published in English only, a fourth printing of the volume was published in 2001 with titles in English and Spanish.”

Publisher Two-Eighteen Press, Carmel, NY, 1974
This edition by Editions 75, Paris, 2001
ISBN 0938690000, 9780938690009
104 pages

Interview with author: Bernard Girard (Contemporary Music Review, 2011/2020).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF