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google street[edit]

cbll=lat,lng; z=zoom; cbp=x,yaw,x,zoom,pitch

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Nederland&hl=en&ll=51.918345,4.474354&spn=0.008444,0.01929&sll=48.145329,17.111217&sspn=0.001142,0.002411&oq=Karel+Doormanhof+45&hnear=Karel+Doormanhof+45,+Deelgemeente+Centrum,+Rotterdam,+Zuid-Holland,+The+Netherlands&t=m&z=16&layer=c&cbll=51.918247,4.474387&panoid=CYD94kZwgx3ql_j0N_0XRA&cbp=12,47.13,,0,1.99

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Margit Rosen, et al. (eds.): A Little-Known Story About a Movement, a Magazine, and The Computer’s Arrival in Art: New Tendencies and Bit International, 1961-1973 (2011)

“When Zagreb was the epicenter of explorations into the aesthetic potential of the new “thinking machines.”

This book documents a short but intense artistic experiment that took place in Yugoslavia in the 1960s and 1970s but has been influential far beyond that time and place: the “little-known story” of the advent of computers in art. It was through the activities of the New Tendencies movement, begun in Zagreb in 1961, and its supporting institution the Galerija suvremene umjetnosti that the “thinking machine” was adopted as an artistic tool and medium. Pursuing the idea of “art as visual research,” the New Tendencies movement proceeded along a path that led from Concrete and Constructivist art, Op art, and Kinetic art to computer-generated graphics, film, and sculpture.

With their exhibitions and conferences and the 1968 launch of the multilingual, groundbreaking magazine Bit International, the New Tendencies transformed Zagreb—already one of the most vibrant artistic centers in Yugoslavia—into an international meeting place where artists, engineers, and scientists from both sides of the Iron Curtain gathered around the then-new technology. For a brief moment in time, Zagreb was the epicenter of explorations of the aesthetic, scientific, and political potential of the computer.

This volume documents that exhilarating period. It includes new essays by Jerko Denegri, Darko Fritz, Margit Rosen, and Peter Weibel; many texts that were first published in New Tendencies exhibition catalogs and Bit International magazine; and historic documents. More than 650 black-and-white and color illustrations testify to the astonishing diversity of the exhibited artworks and introduce the movement’s protagonists. Many of the historic photographs, translations, and documents are published here for the first time. Taken together, the images and texts offer the long overdue history of the New Tendencies experiment and its impact on the art of the twentieth century.”

Edited by Margit Rosen in collaboration with Peter Weibel, Darko Fritz, and Marija Gattin
Publisher ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, and MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2011
ISBN 9780262515818, 0262515814
576 pages

Reviews: Brian Reffin Smith (Leonardo, 2012), Joanna Inglot (Slavic Review, 2012), Greg Borman (ARLIS/NA, 2011).

Book website
Exhibition (ZKM, 2008)
Publisher
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (102 MB)

See also New Tendencies and Bit International on Monoskop wiki.

George Antheil: Bad Boy of Music (1945–)

George Antheil (1900-1959) was a radical American composer active in the early part of 20th century. He was recognised by the Parisian avant-garde literary community as a musical spokesman for their ideas. In the late 1920s Antheil participated in the operatic renaissance in Germany, and, after his return to America in 1933, he attempted to synthesize an American musical idiom in his neoromantic film, symphonic, chamber, and operatic scores.

In his autobiography, Antheil gives a fascinating account of the creative activity in Berlin, Paris, Vienna, New York and Hollywood, discussing his encounters with Igor Stravinsky, Hedy Lamarr, James Joyce, Man Ray, Ezra Pound, Sylvia Beach, W.B. Yeats, Erik Satie, Pablo Picasso, Cecil B. DeMille, Fritz Lang, Salvador Dalí and others.

First published by Doubleday, Doran & Co., Garden City, NY, 1945
Published in the UK by Hurst & Blackett, London, 1947
Reprinted by National Book Association / Hutchinson & Co., London, 1949
295 pages
via Tom Whitwell

Reviews: Milfred Norton (Hollywood Quarterly, 1946), Linda Whitesitt (American Music, 1984).
Commentary: Guy Livingston (ABC Radio National, 2015).

WorldCat

PDF (12 MB)

Anon Collective (ed.): Book of Anonymity (2021)

“Anonymity is highly contested, marking the limits of civil liberties and legality. Digital technologies of communication, identification, and surveillance put anonymity to the test. They challenge how anonymity can be achieved, and dismantled. Everyday digital practices and claims for transparency shape the ways in which anonymity is desired, done, and undone.

The Book of Anonymity includes contributions by artists, anthropologists, sociologists, media scholars, and art historians. It features ethnographic research, conceptual work, and artistic practices conducted in France, Germany, India, Iran, Switzerland, the UK, and the US. From police to hacking cultures, from Bitcoin to sperm donation, from Yik-Yak to Amazon and IKEA, from DNA to Big Data — thirty essays address how the reconfiguration of anonymity transforms our concepts of privacy, property, self, kin, addiction, currency, and labor.” (from back cover)

Contributors: Anon, Götz Bachmann, Dwaipayan Banerjee, Solon Barocas, Aram Bartholl, Amelie Baumann, Vadim Bernard, Paula Bialski, Andreas Broeckmann, Heath Bunting, Martin De Bie, Bureau d’études, Jacob Copeman, Abigail Curlew, Stéphane Degoutin, Simon Farid, Parastou Forouhar, Randi Heinrichs, Anna Henke, Michi Knecht, knowbotiq, Gertraud Koch, Julien McHardy, Helen Nissenbaum, Gerald Raunig, RYBN.ORG, Daniela Silvestrin, Thorsten Thiel, Transformella, Daniël de Zeeuw, Nils Zurawski.

Publisher Punctum Books, March 2021
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 International license
ISBN 9781953035301
484 pages
HT coco

Publisher
PubPub
OAPEN

PDF (11 MB)

Hugh Davies: Sounds Heard: A Potpourri of Environmental Projects and Documentation, Projects with Children, Simple Musical Instruments, Sound Installations, Verbal Scores, and Historical Perspectives (2002)

Sounds Heard is not only a collection of writings intended for people who are interested or involved in contemporary music, especially those performers – including children – who lack a formal musical training. It also charts a wide cross-section of the activities of an intriguing musical personality. At different times in Hugh Davies’ nearly 40 year career he has been variously described as “the world’s leading electromusicologist”, “the most informed person around on the general subject of new instruments”, “unique English composer”, “one of the most interesting instrument inventors of recent decades”, “the remarkable live-electronics ‘freak”‘, an “electronic wizard”, “a humanist” and “I have never seen any music teacher who is as fond of children as he is”. Do these really refer to only one person? Who is the real Hugh Davies? Why has his modesty prevented him from being better known?

This book focuses on many of Davies’ insights about working as an artist, a musician, a composer, a performer, an instrument inventor, an educator and a researcher. He takes nothing for granted, and there are always wider implications than his own immediate involvement. Even his more avantgarde scenarios are tempered with his “very British sense of humour”. Many of the different areas of experimental music since the 1960s are touched on, including electronic music, live electronics, invented instruments, sound sculpture, sound installations and free improvisation, in all of which he was one of the British pioneers.

The CD illustrates a cross-section of the themes covered in the book. As with most of Hugh Davies’ solo performances and recordings, no conventional instruments were used on the entire album, with the exception of one short piece in which existing music has been manipulated with tape techniques.” (from back cover)

Publisher Soundworld Publishers, Chelmsford, 2002
ISBN 1902440056, 9781902440057
124 pages

Publisher (archived)
WorldCat

PDF (29 MB)
Selections from accompanying CD

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"I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

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I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

three

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

four

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

five

I should also say that I don’t see any contradictions at all between music and noise. Most so-called noises that have been used in the film have not been reproduced by means of noise instruments, but rather have been reproduced by musical means by real musical instruments.
The harmonium has played a huge role in this business: we can produce the sound of a dynamo-motor, taking, for example, an interval of a semitone in the low register.
The sound of the flight of an aeroplane..

twitter[edit]

infobox book[edit]

Soundings
Author Suzanne Delehanty
Publisher Neuberger Museum/State University of New York
City Purchase, NY
Year 1981
Pages 96
Format 21 x 14.85 cm
Fabrication Risograph
E-book PDF

monoskop log category listing[edit]

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&json=1&count=40

https://monoskop.org/log/?cat=887&feed=rss2&count=40

Over Borders (2021)

“This collection began as an idea to share some of our own scores* connected to the act or effects of borders, which we then expanded to include work by others in our creative communities. Artists / composers were asked to send scores that, in some way, referenced borders; social, political, virtual, perceptual, environmental or between species.”

Curated by Jez riley French and Pheobe riley Law
Self-published, April 2021
[52] pages

Publisher

PDF (20 MB)

Henry Flynt: Blueprint for a Higher Civilization (1975)

Book collects the artist’s early philosophical writings on concept art (Flynt coined the term in 1961) and cognitive nihilism. Includes photographs by Jack Smith and Tony Conrad of Flynt’s anti-art demonstrations against MoMA and the Lincoln Center in 1963.

Edited by Germano Celant
Publisher Multhipla, Milan, October 1975
206 pages
via Nourathar

WorldCat

PDF (28 MB, broken link has been fixed on 2021-2-1)

Adam Pendleton: Black Dada: What Can Black Dada Do for Me Do for Me Black Dada, a Reader (2017)

Black Dada Reader is a collection of texts and documents that elucidates “Black Dada,” a term that acclaimed New York–based artist Adam Pendleton (born 1984) uses to define his artistic output. The Reader brings a diverse range of cultural figures into a shared conceptual space, including Hugo Ball, W.E.B. Du Bois, Stokely Carmichael, LeRoi Jones, Sun Ra, Adrian Piper, Joan Retallack, Harryette Mullen, Ron Silliman and Gertrude Stein, as well as artists from different generations such as Ad Reinhardt, Joan Jonas, William Pope.L, Thomas Hirschhorn and Stan Douglas. The Reader also includes essays on the concept of Black Dada and its historical implications from curators and critics including Adrienne Edwards (Walker Arts Center / Performa), Laura Hoptman (MoMA), Tom McDonough (Binghamton), Jenny Schlenzka (PS122) and Susan Thompson (Guggenheim).”

Edited by Stephen Squibb
Publisher Koenig Books, London, 2017
ISBN 9783960981053, 3960981058
331 pages
via tilda

Interviews with author: Jess Wilcox (Art in America, 2009), Karlynne Ejercito (Artforum, 2016), Awa Konaté (Third Text, 2020).

Reviews: Yaniya Lee (Flash Art, 2017), Terence Trouillot (ArtNet, 2017), Robin Pogrebin (New York Times, 2018).

WorldCat

PDF (64 MB)