Thalia

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Cover of Thalia 1, 1910.

Thalia: tidning för scenisk konst och litteratur [magazine for scenic art and music] was a weekly magazine published in 1910-13 in Stockholm. Edited by the journalist Gustav Åsbrink, the dramatist and theatre director Gustaf Collijn, and the composer Andreas Hallén.

Through Collijn contacts were made with young open-minded contributors both in Sweden and abroad, including Leon Feuchtwanger, Sven Lange and Max Reinhardt. In 1912, Thalia showcased Italian futurism and published one of Marinetti’s manifestos. the following year, an interview with Nijinski was published under the headline “Futurist dance art”. even though scenic art was the main focus of Thalia, young Swedish writers looked upon it as an important magazine for avant-garde ideas. [1]

Literature[edit]

  • Claes-Göran Holmberg, Upprorets tradition. Den unglitterära tidskriften i Sverige, Stockholm: Symposion, 1987, 307 pp. (Swedish) [2]
  • Mats Jansson, "Crossing Borders: Modernism in Sweden and the Swedish-Speaking Part of Finland: Thalia (1909-13); Ny konst (1915); flamman (1917-21); Ultra (1922); Quosego (1928-9); kontakt (1931); Spektrum (1931-3); and Karavan (1934-5)", in The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Vol. 3 (Europe, 1880-1940), New York: Oxford University Press, 2013, pp 666-690. [3]

See also[edit]

Links[edit]


Avant-garde and modernist magazines

Poesia (1905-09, 1920), Der Sturm (1910-32), Blast (1914-15), The Egoist (1914-19), The Little Review (1914-29), 291 (1915-16), MA (1916-25), De Stijl (1917-20, 1921-32), Dada (1917-21), Noi (1917-25), 391 (1917-24), Zenit (1921-26), Broom (1921-24), Veshch/Gegenstand/Objet (1922), Die Form (1922, 1925-35), Contimporanul (1922-32), Secession (1922-24), Klaxon (1922-23), Merz (1923-32), LEF (1923-25), G (1923-26), Irradiador (1923), Sovremennaya architektura (1926-30), Novyi LEF (1927-29), ReD (1927-31), Close Up (1927-33), transition (1927-38).