Difference between revisions of "Umělecký měsíčník"

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==Issues==
 
==Issues==
* [http://bluemountain.princeton.edu/title.html?titleURN=urn:PUL:bluemountain:bmtnabk Scans of full run in Blue Montain Project]
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* [http://bluemountain.princeton.edu/exist/apps/bluemountain/title.html?titleURN=bmtnabk Scans of full run in Blue Montain Project] (number 1:3 missing)
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* [http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/umeleck-mescnk?&keywords=&sort=sortString+asc#/?tab=navigation Scans in New York Public Library Digital Collections] (1911-13)
  
 
==Literature==
 
==Literature==

Latest revision as of 17:48, 18 January 2017

Umělecký mĕsíčník [Art Monthly] was the publication of a Czech Cubist group that separated from the Mánes Association of Fine Artists, branding themselves a "defiant modernist vanguard" and supporting exhibitions of Cubism and Expressionism at Galerie Der Sturm.

First six numbers were edited by Josef Čapek, the subsequent by Pavel Janák and František Langer. Contributors included also Emil Filla, Otto Gutfreund, Vincenc Beneš, and Antonín Procházka.

Issues[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • Nicholas Sawicki, "The View From Prague: Moderní revue (1894-1925); Volné směry (1896-1949); Umělecký měsíčník (1911-14); Revoluční sborník Devětsil (1922); Život (1922); Disk (1923-5); Pásmo (1924-6); and ReD (1927-31)", in The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, Vol. 3, Europe 1880-1940, eds. Brooker, Bru, Thacker, and Weikop, Oxford University Press, 2013, pp 1074-1098. [1] [2]


Avant-garde and modernist magazines

Poesia (1905-09, 1920), Der Sturm (1910-32), Blast (1914-15), The Egoist (1914-19), The Little Review (1914-29), 291 (1915-16), MA (1916-25), De Stijl (1917-20, 1921-32), Dada (1917-21), Noi (1917-25), 391 (1917-24), Zenit (1921-26), Broom (1921-24), Veshch/Gegenstand/Objet (1922), Die Form (1922, 1925-35), Contimporanul (1922-32), Secession (1922-24), Klaxon (1922-23), Merz (1923-32), LEF (1923-25), G (1923-26), Irradiador (1923), Sovremennaya architektura (1926-30), Novyi LEF (1927-29), ReD (1927-31), Close Up (1927-33), transition (1927-38).