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Welcome to [[About Monoskop|Monoskop]], a wiki for arts, media and humanities.   
 
Welcome to [[About Monoskop|Monoskop]], a wiki for arts, media and humanities.   
  
This page shows some of our recent sections. For other entry points see [https://monoskop.org/log Monoskop Log], [[Contents]] or [[Index]]. Selected updates are posted on [https://monoskop.org/log/?feed=rss2 RSS], [http://twitter.com/monoskop Twitter], [http://www.facebook.com/monoskoplog Facebook] and [http://instagram.com/monoskoporg Instagram].
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This page shows some of our recent sections. For other entry points see [https://monoskop.org/log Monoskop Log], [[Contents]] or [[Index]]. Selected updates are posted on [https://monoskop.org/log/?page_id=331 email], [https://monoskop.org/log/?feed=rss2 RSS], [http://twitter.com/monoskop Twitter], [http://www.facebook.com/monoskoplog Facebook] and [http://instagram.com/monoskoporg Instagram].
  
 
==Recent entries==
 
==Recent entries==

Revision as of 15:49, 8 December 2020

Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for arts, media and humanities.

This page shows some of our recent sections. For other entry points see Monoskop Log, Contents or Index. Selected updates are posted on email, RSS, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Recent entries

Monoskop Log

Christina Dunbar-Hester: Hacking Diversity: The Politics of Inclusion in Open Technology Cultures (2020)

“A firsthand look at efforts to improve diversity in software and hackerspace communities.

Hacking, as a mode of technical and cultural production, is commonly celebrated for its extraordinary freedoms of creation and circulation. Yet surprisingly few women participate in it: rates of involvement by technologically skilled women are drastically lower in hacking communities than in industry and academia. Hacking Diversity investigates the activists engaged in free and open-source software to understand why, despite their efforts, they fail to achieve the diversity that their ideals support.

Christina Dunbar-Hester shows that within this well-meaning volunteer world, beyond the sway of human resource departments and equal opportunity legislation, members of underrepresented groups face unique challenges. She brings together more than five years of firsthand research: attending software conferences and training events, working on message boards and listservs, and frequenting North American hackerspaces. She explores who participates in voluntaristic technology cultures, to what ends, and with what consequences. Digging deep into the fundamental assumptions underpinning STEM-oriented societies, Dunbar-Hester demonstrates that while the preferred solutions of tech enthusiasts—their “hacks” of projects and cultures—can ameliorate some of the “bugs” within their own communities, these methods come up short for issues of unequal social and economic power. Distributing “diversity” in technical production is not equal to generating justice.

Hacking Diversity reframes questions of diversity advocacy to consider what interventions might appropriately broaden inclusion and participation in the hacking world and beyond.”

Publisher Princeton University Press, 2020
Princeton Studies in Culture and Technology series
ISBN 9780691182070, 0691182078
xi+271 pages

Reviews: Jenna P. Carpenter (Tech & Society, 2021), Rebecca Ortenberg (Lady Science, 2020), Samantha Shorey (International Journal of Communication, 2020).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

Tilman Baumgärtel, Julian Weinert: Van Gogh TV’s Piazza Virtuale: The Invention of Social Media at documenta IX in 1992 (2021)

Piazza virtuale by the group of artists known as Van Gogh TV was not only the biggest art project ever to appear on television, but from a contemporary point of view the project was also a forerunner of today’s social media. The ground-breaking event that took place during the 100 days of documenta IX in 1992 was an early experiment with entirely user-created content. This is the first book-length study of this largely forgotten experiment: it documents the radicality of Piazza virtuale‘s approach, the novel programme ideas and the technical innovations. It also allows, via QR codes, direct access to videos from the show, which until now have been inaccessible.”

Publisher transcript, Bielefeld, December 2021
Media Studies series, 96
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license
ISBN 3837660664, 9783837660661
231 pages

Research project website
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF

Bálint András Varga: Conversations with Iannis Xenakis (1996)

“The music of the Greek-born composer, Iannis Xenakis, has been called brutal and violent. He first studied as an architect, but then turned to composition and put to musical use his knowledge of higher mathematics. In these conversations conducted between 1980 and 1989 he talks about his life and music.”

Publisher Faber and Faber, London, 1996
ISBN 0571179592, 9780571179596
255 pages

Review: Mihu Iliescu (Computer Music Journal, 2000).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

Charlotte Johannesson. Take Me to Another World (2021) [EN, ES]

“A key figure of Swedish counterculture and the creator of the first digital arts laboratory in Nordic countries, Charlotte Johannesson has worked primarily with two tools: the artisan technology of the loom and digital IT programming technology, exploring and throwing into relief the connections, both conceptual and methodological, that exist between the two.

Charlotte Johannesson. Take Me to Another World renders an account of the meticulous research process around colour and line that the artist executes in her textile and digital practice. It also spotlights the contribution of Danish writer and artist Amalie Smith, who set up a dialogue between Johannesson’s career and her own present-tense narrative. Furthermore, the publication incorporates an interview conducted with the artist in 2012, re-edited and translated for this occasion.”

Publisher Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2021
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISBN 9788480266246, 8480266244
172 pages

Exhibition
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (English)
PDF, PDF (Spanish)

Janneke Adema: Living Books: Experiments in the Posthumanities (2021)

“Reimagining the scholarly book as living and collaborative—not as commodified and essentialized, but in all its dynamic materiality.

In this book, Janneke Adema proposes that we reimagine the scholarly book as a living and collaborative project—not as linear, bound, and fixed, but as fluid, remixed, and liquid, a space for experimentation. She presents a series of cutting-edge experiments in arts and humanities book publishing, showcasing the radical new forms that book-based scholarly work might take in the digital age. Adema’s proposed alternative futures for the scholarly book go beyond such print-based assumptions as fixity, stability, the single author, originality, and copyright, reaching instead for a dynamic and emergent materiality.

Adema suggests ways to unbind the book, describing experiments in scholarly book publishing with new forms of anonymous collaborative authorship, radical open access publishing, and processual, living, and remixed publications, among other practices. She doesn’t cast digital as the solution and print as the problem; the problem in scholarly publishing, she argues, is not print itself, but the way print has been commodified and essentialized. Adema explores alternative, more ethical models of authorship; constructs an alternative genealogy of openness; and examines opportunities for intervention in current cultures of knowledge production. Finally, asking why it is that we cut and bind our research together at all, she examines two book publishing projects that experiment with remix and reuse and try to rethink and reperform the book-apparatus by taking responsibility for the cuts they make.”

Publisher MIT Press, August 2021
Leonardo series
Creative Commons BY-NC 4.0 International License
ISBN 9780262046022, 0262046024
xiii+335 pages

Interview with author: Erzsébet Tóth-Czifra (Dariah Open, 2021).

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML (on PubPub)
PDF
PDFs