Monoskop

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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed listings see the Log, Recent, Contents and Index sections. Selected updates are posted on RSS, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Recent entries

Monoskop Log

Yvonne P. Doderer: Shining Cities: Gender Relations and Other Issues in Urban Development of the Twenty-First Century (2016)

“In the twenty-first century, the majority of people are living in cities—at least this is the credo communicated frequently. This statement has been strengthened by the “urban renaissance” that dawned at the beginning of the twenty-first century and by a globally evident increase in capital investment in urban-development projects. Such planning endeavors are conveyed to the public, the political sphere, and the media with the help of Internet platforms. The visualizations and descriptions found on such project websites are associated with promises of modernization, appeal, and economic growth—in short, with a better life.

In this publication, images and texts from 12 projects planned for Europe, Africa, and Asia are surveyed critically: What do they “tell” about future life in these new urban districts? Who will live and work in these cities? Which forms of living and lifestyles are propagated? And most importantly: How do these designs relate to actual urban reality, including that of the inhabitants to whom the projects are addressed?

Written in a comprehensible way, supplemented by illustrations and photographs, this in-depth analysis sensitizes the reader to the interconnections between urban-space production and societal (gender) relations.”

Self-published, 2016
Digital Peer Publishing Licence (DPPL)
ISBN 9783000550188
321 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF (8 MB)

Eintritt in ein Lebewesen. Von der sozialen Skulptur zum Plattform-Kapitalismus / Journey Into a Living Being: From Social Sculpture to Platform Capitalism (2020) [German/English]

“In 1977, Joseph Beuys presented his installation Honey Machine at the Workplace at documenta 6, in which tubes ran into the exhibition rooms, through which honey was pumped. The work symbolized Beuys’ idea of the expanded concept of art and of social sculpture. “Everyone is an artist” is his famous motto –not because everyone can paint, dance or make music, but because we all contribute through our productivity to a collective creativity that can be weighed as real capital and societal potential, to which Beuys ascribed the formula “art = capital.” Honey as the “spiritual nutrition of the cosmos” (Beuys) is the embodiment of this collective creativity.

These days, we deliver our creative “honey” voluntarily to internet companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter, TikTok or Amazon. Computers and smartphones, online speakers and fitness wristbands upload a large portion of our data to these companies’ servers. Even rental bikes and e-scooters collect our location data. Our every click, every Like, every photo posted and every online comment is fuel for the companies of “surveillance capitalism” (Shoshana Zuboff). They use our data to sell advertising, predict our behavior, optimize their algorithms and AI, and to keep competing companies out of the market as much as possible.

The exhibition Journey Into a Living Being takes its name from a lecture Beuys gave on social sculpture at documenta. It traces the conceptual trajectory to the present, in which the internet and social media are replete with offers of creative services, but where only few reap the financial rewards. It brings together artworks spanning forty years with the aim of deciphering what has come to pass between the development of social sculpture and the rise of platform capitalism and the gig economy, and how this process is reflected in art.”

Edited by Tilman Baumgärtel
Publisher Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien, Berlin, 2020
ISBN 9783000652608, 3000652604
111 pages

Exhibition (18.5-16.8.2020)
WorldCat

PDF (6 MB)

Marina Gržinić (ed.): Border Thinking: Disassembling Histories of Racialized Violence (2018)

Border Thinking: Disassembling Histories of Racialized Violence aims to question and provide answers to current border issues in Europe. Central to this investigation is a refugee crisis that is primarily a crisis of global Western capitalism and its components: modernization, nationalism, structural racism, dispossession, and social, political, and economic violence.

In this volume, these notions and conditions are connected with the concept of borders, which seems to have disappeared as a function of the global neoliberal economy but is palpably reappearing again and again through deportations, segregations, and war. How can we think about these relations in an open way, beyond borders? Is it possible to develop border thinking for a radical transformation, as a means to revolutionize the state of things? To do this, we must reconsider what is possible for the social and the political as well as for art and culture.”

With contributions by Ilya Budraitskis, Maira Enesi Caixeta, C.A.S.I.T.A., Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso, Miguel González Cabezas, Marina Gržinić, Juan Guardiola, Çetin Gürer, Neda Hosseinyar, Njideka Stephanie Iroh, Adla Isanović, Fieke Jansen, Tjaša Kancler, Zoltán Kékesi, Betül Seyma Küpeli, Gergana Mineva, Musawenkosi Ndlovu, Stanimir Panayotov, Suvendrini Perera, Jelena Petrović, Khaled Ramadan, Rubia Salgado, Marika Schmiedt, Joshua Simon, Aneta Stojnić, Shirley Anne Tate, Göksun Yazıcı, Hiroshi Yoshioka.

Publisher Sternberg Press, Berlin, 2018
Publication Series of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, 21
ISBN 9783956793837
308 pages
via AkBild Vienna

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

Tilman Baumgärtel: net.art 2.0. Neue Materialien zur Netzkunst / New Materials on Art on the Internet (2001) [German/English]

“This follow-up to the first net art book documents developments in net art at the turn of the millenium. A large portion of the book consists of interviews with artists such as Julia Scher, Peter Halley, Blank & Jeron, Jodi, etoy and Lisa Jevbratt, who have created major projects using the internet. The conversations are supplemented by a documentary appendix and an essay by Tilman Baumgärtel describing the specifics of net art and its place in artistic discourse. Interspersed with the text components are images of more than 130 net-based works.”

Translated by David Hudson
Publisher Verlag für moderne Kunst, Nürnberg, 2001
ISBN 3933096669, 9783933096661
263 pages

Review: Lutz Nitsche (MedienWissenschaft, 2002, DE).

Author (archived)
Publisher (archived)
WorldCat

PDF (15 MB)

Alan Read (ed.): The Fact of Blackness: Frantz Fanon and Visual Representation (1996)

“Creating a far-reaching and original dialogue between cultural theory and visual practice, the rich insights which emerge from this publication explain why Frantz Fanon’s seminal texts of the 1950s and 60s – Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth – have re-emerged at the forefront of postcolonial studies.

This collection of texts and dialogues work with Fanon’s ideas in understanding how narrative, the media, image, and symbol lie at the very heart of the practice of politics and social knowledge.

Originating from the symposium Working with Fanon held during the season Mirage: Enigmas of Race, Difference and Desire (ICA, London, 1995).”

Contributors: Martina Attille, Homi K. Bhabha, Renée Green, Stuart Hall, Lyle Ashton Harris, bell hooks, Isaac Julien, Marc Latamie, Steve McQueen, Kobena Mercer, Mark Nash, Raoul Peck, Alan Read, Ntozake Shange, Gilane Tawadros, Françoise Vergès, Lola Young.

Publisher ICA, London, in association with Iniva, London, and Bay Press, Seattle, 1996
ISBN 1900300028, 9781900300025
211 pages

Reviews: David Macey (Radical Philosophy, 1997), Julian Samuel (Race & Class, 1997), D. Soyini Madison (Signs, 1999).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (3 MB)