Lithuania

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Avant-garde[edit]

Artists
  • Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, painter and composer. In 1904-1909 explored the analogies between music and the visual arts. He draws on Lithuanian folklore, Oriental mysticism, and uses more abstract forms than many of his Russian contemporaries.
  • Vytautas Kairiūkštis, painter and graphic artist of Lithuanian origin, creator of photomontages, art theoretician and critic, educator, representative of the artistic avant-garde of the 1920s.
  • Keturi vėjai (Four Winds), literary movement
  • Dailės draugija (the Art Society), *1907 in Vilnius. It organises 8 exhibitions before WW1. Its members include Lithuanians, Poles, Jews, and Russians who act as a conduit of information about Futurism, Cubism and Expressionism to local artists in Vilnius.
Events
  • The New Art Exhibition [Wystawa Nowej Sztuki] was held on 20 May - 20 June 1923 at Corso Cinema [Kinematograf Corso] on A. Mickiewicz Avenue in Vilnius [Wilno] and organised by Władysław Strzemiński and Vytautas Kairiūkštis. One of the first manifestations of constructivist art outside Russia. Works included painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture, scenography, and prints. Cubist, Constructivist, and Suprematist compositions predominated. Its catalogue includes Kairiūkštis’ constructivist manifesto. The exhibition marked the first appearance of Polish Constructivism; besides Strzemiński and Kairiūkštis participants also included Mieczysław Szczuka (first montage photographs), Henryk Stażewski, Teresa Żarnowerówna, Karol Kryński, and Maria Puciatycka, all of whom later become the members of the Blok group.
Education
  • Vilnius University reopens in 1918 as the Stefan Batory University. Its department of fine arts is directed by Ferdynand Ruszczyc and includes leading figures from Poland’s avant-garde (Zbigniew Pronaszko, Benedykt Kubicki).
  • Lithuanian School of Art established in 1921. As well as teaching it awards grants to more talented students to train in western European art centres
Writings
  • In 1913, the Vilnius daily Przegląd Wileński (No. 48-49) reprinted F. T. Marinetti’s Manifesto of Futurism.
  • Kairiūkštis' constructivist manifesto, in the catalogue of The New Art Exhibition, 1923
Literature
  • Juozas Pivoriunas, "A Lithuanian Individualist. The Art of M. K. Čiurlionis", Lituanus 11:4 (Winter 1965). [1]
  • Sandra Alvarez de Toledo, "Un ghetto à l’est. Wilno, 1931", Communications 79:1 (2006), pp 151-167. (French)
  • Viktoras Liutkus, "Lithuanian Art and the Avant-Garde of the 1920s: Vytautas Kairiūkštis and the New Art Exhibition in Vilnius", Lituanus, 2008. [2]
  • Viktoras Liutkus, "Vytauto Kairiūkščio (1890–1961) suprematistinė kūryba ir fotomontažai", Menotyra, 2008. [3]
  • Viktoras Liutkus, "Vytautas Kairiūkštis and Avant-garde Cinema", 2010. [4] partial translation
  • Vida Mažrimienė, "Vytautas Kairiūkštis: In the Field of Radical Changes", 2010. [5] partial translation

Experimental film[edit]

Performance art[edit]

George Maciunas [9], Vytautas Landsbergis [10], Nomeda and Gediminas Urbonas [11]

Events
  • Fluxus concerts in 1966 [12]

Electroacoustic and experimental music[edit]

Literature

Video art[edit]

Equipment
  • VCRs were availabe on the black market by the late 1970s. In 1986 a VCR cost the equivalent of 17 months average wage (Mark R. Levy, The VCR Age)
Artists
Exhibitions
  • French-Baltic Video Festival, Vilnius, 1994, 1995.
  • Twilight. Curated by Deimantas Narkevicius, Kestutis Kuizinas, and Evaldas Stankevicius, Contemporary Art Center Vilnius, 1998.
  • Lithuanian Art 1989-1999. The Ten Years. Curated by Kestutis Kuizinas, Raimundas Malasauskas, Deimantas Narkevicius, Evaldas Stankevicius, Jonas Valatkevicius, Contemporary Art Center, Vilnius, 1999.
  • The Others are Me. Social Instinct in Lithuanian Art. Curated by Maria Anna Potocka, Gallery of Contemporary Art BUNKIER SZTUKI, Krakow, 2004.
Literature

New media art, Media culture[edit]

Cities

Vilnius, Kaunas, Nida, Alytus.

Literature
  • Renata Šukaitytė, "New Media Art in Lithuania", Athena: Philosophical Studies (3/2008). [18], [19]
  • Renata Šukautytė, "Media art as a scientific-experimental space. The case of Lithuanian, Latvian and Estonian art in the 20th (2nd part)–21st centuries", Menotyra, vol 15, Nr 2, 2008, pp 50-61. [20]
  • Face the Unexpected: Media Art from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, catalogue, 2006, [21]


Countries
avant-garde, modernism and after

Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Central and Eastern Europe, Chile, China, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kosova, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States