Serbia

From Monoskop
Jump to: navigation, search

Avant-garde[edit]

Artists[edit]

Exhibition[edit]

  • The First Zenit International Exhibition of New Art [Прва Зенитова међународна изложба нове уметности / Première Zenit-Exposition Internationale de l'Art Nouveau] organised by Ljubomir Micić in April 1924 in the Stanković music school, Belgrade. The establishment of a collection of avant-garde works for Zenit’s gallery, presented to the public at the editorial office of the periodical, first in Zagreb, then in Belgrade, and for a while even in the Paris suburb of Meudon, reflected great social and educational ambitions on the part of Zenit. The gallery advertised the works as "futurism, cubism, expressionism, ornamental cubism, suprematism, constructivism, neoclassicism and the like". This broad scope provided the basis for Zenit's exhibition, featuring more than one hundred exhibits by significant 20th-century artists (Kandinsky, Moholy-Nagy, Lissitzky, Archipenko, Delaunay, Charchoune, Gleizes, Peeters, Zadkine, Paladini, Prampolini and others). Local scene was represented by Balsamadjieva, Katchulev, Bojadjiev, Willink, Hansen, Medgyes, Freudenau, Helen Grünhoff- Elena Gringova, Vilko Gecan, Jo Klek, V. Foretić-Vis, Vjera Biller, M. Petrov, and Branko Ve Poljanski. The exhibition did not receive a lot of publicity, and was therefore not very well attended, but Micić later wrote "No boycott had any effect" – evidently convinced of the purpose and the value of such an undertaking.

Journals[edit]

  • Zenit: International Review of Arts and Culture was a Yugoslav avant-garde magazine published in 43 numbers in 34 volumes in Zagreb (Feb 1921-May 1923) and Belgrade (Jun 1923-Dec 1926). Its founder, editor and the chief ideologist of the Zenitist aesthetics Ljubomir Micić, a poet and art critic, was the main progenitor of the avant-garde in Croatia and Serbia during the first half of the 1920s.
  • Hipnos journal, 1922-23, of Hipnist movement, edited by Rade Drainac. Two issues published. Feat. work by Moni Buli.
  • Misao, ed. Ranko Mladenović, Belgrade, 1921-22.
  • other Belgrade avant-garde magazines and almanacs: Putevi (Paths) (1922-24), Crno na belo (Black on White) (1924), Svedočanstva (Testimonies) (1924-25), 50 u Evropi (50 in Europe) (1928-29), Tragovi (Traces) (1928-29), Nova literatura (The New Literature) (1928-30), Nemoguće (Impossible) (1930), Nadrealizam danas i ovde (Surrealism Here and Now) (1931-32).

Publications[edit]

  • Bosko Tokin, Micic and Gol: Manifestos of Expressionism and Zenithism
  • Bosko Tokin, "Pokusaj jedne kinematografske estetike" [Essasis d'une estetique cinegraphique], 1920. Considered the first film theory work in Yugoslavia. Greatly influenced by French visualists.
  • Ljubomir Micić, "Barbarogenius", Zenit, 1924.
  • Ljubomir Micić, "The New Art", Zenit, 1924.
  • Ljubomir Micić, "Zenithosophy: Or the Energetics of Creative Zenithism", Zenit, 1924.
  • Risto Ratković, "Barbarism as Culture", Zenit, 1925.
  • Tivadar Raith, "Toward the Documentation of the European Cultural Crisis: Five Years of Zenithism", Magyar Iras, 1926.
  • Branko Ve Poljanski, "Upside Down", 1926.
  • Ljubomir Micić, "Beyond-Sense Poetry", Introduction to Anti-Europe, 1926.
  • Ljubomir Micić, "Zenithism through the Prism of Marxism", Zenit, 1926.

Literature[edit]

Serbia
  • Jelena Bogdanović, Lilien Filipovitch Robinson, Igor Marjanović (eds.), On the Very Edge: Modernism and Modernity in the Arts and Architecture of Interwar Serbia (1918-1941), Leuven University Press, 2014. [1] (English)
  • more, more
Yugoslavia
  • Treća decenija, Konstruktivno slikarstvo, eds. Jerko Denegri and Dragoslav Đorđević, Belgrade: Muzej savremene umetnosti, 1967, 249 pp. Catalogue; with texts by Miodrag B. Protić, Jerko Denegri, Špelca Čopič. (Serbo-Croatian),(French)
  • 1929-1950: Nadrealizam, socijalana umetnost, ed. Miodrag B. Protić, Belgrade: Muzej primenjene umetnosti, 1969, 291 pp. Catalogue; in the exhibition the work of the Belgrade Surrealists was reconstructed, studied and exhibited as a whole for the first time. With texts by Miodrag B. Protić, Jerko Denegri, Božica Ćosić, Josip Depolo, Špelca Čopič, Azra Begić, Boris Petrovski, Boris Šuica, Dragoslav Đorđević. [2] (Serbo-Croatian)
  • Četvrta decenija, Ekspresionizam boje, poetski realizam, ed. Miodrag B. Protić, Belgrade: Muzej savremene umetnosti, 1971, 206 pp. Catalogue; with texts by Miodrag B. Protić, Jerko Denegri, Aleksa Čelebonović, Igor Zidić, Špelca Čopič. (Serbo-Croatian)
  • Želimir Koščević, "Jugoslawische Bauhausschüler", Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift / A, Hochschule für Architektur und Bauwesen, Jg. 33, 1987, H. 4/6. [3]
  • Irina Subotić, "Avant-Garde Tendencies in Yugoslavia", Art Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1, From Leningrad to Ljubljana: The Suppressed Avant-Gardes of East-Central and Eastern Europe during the Early Twentieth Century (Spring, 1990), pp. 21-27. Published by: College Art Association. [4]
  • Esther Levinger, "The Avant-Garde in Yugoslavia", The Structurist 29/30, 1990, pp 66-72.
  • Irina Subotić, "Concerning Art and Politics in Yugoslavia during the 1930s", Art Journal Vol. 52, No. 1, Political Journals and Art, 1910-40 (Spring, 1993), pp. 69-71. [5]
  • Ivan Dorovský, "Některé zvláštnosti balkánské avantgardy", in Dorovský, Balkán a Mediterán: literárně historické a teoretické studie, Brno: Masarykova univerzita, 1997, pp 193-201. (Czech)
  • Esther Levinger, "Ljubomir Micic and the Zenitist Utopia", in Exchange and Transformation: The Central European Avant-Garde, 1910-1930, exh. cat. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, Cal. 2002, pp. 260-278.
  • Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković (eds.), Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, MIT Press, 2003. [6]
  • Dubravka Đurić, "Radical Poetic Practices: Concrete and Visual Poetry in the Avant-garde and Neo-avant-garde", in Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, eds. Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković, MIT Press, 2003, pp 64-95.
  • Darko Šimičić, "From Zenit to Mental Space: Avant-garde, Neo-avant-garde, and Post-avant-garde Magazines and Books in Yugoslavia, 1921--1987", in Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, eds. Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković, MIT Press, 2003, pp 294-331.
  • Katherine Ann Carl, Aoristic Avant-garde: Experimental Art in 1960s and 1970s Yugoslavia. Dissertation, Stony Brook University, May 2009. [7]
  • Г. Тешић, Српска књижевна авангарда. Књижевноисторијски контекст (1902–1934), Belgrade: Институт за књижевност и уметност - Службени гласник, 2009, 618 pp. Review.
  • Laurel Seely Vorodel and Tyrus Miller, "Avant-Garde Periodicals in the Yugoslavian Crucible", in The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines, vol. 3 (Europe, 1880-1940), New York: Oxford University Press, 2013, pp 1099-1127. [8]
  • more, more

Film[edit]

  • Karpo Acimovic-Godina, The Medusa Raft (Splav meduze, 1980). Film about Zenithists. [9]

Experimental film[edit]

"In all of the former Yugoslavia experimental film almost unfailingly derived from the tradition of the so-called amateur film, whose home ground consisted in the numerous cinema clubs (kino klub) that flourished in all major cities of the former federation. The line separating amateur film from experimental film is thus unclear not only due to the subjectivity of judgment, but also because the former term in its most widely accepted meaning refers to the production conditions, while the latter term designates the aspirations, procedures, and effects of a specific cinematic expression. Furthermore, the terms experimental film and its more or less synonymous avant-garde film never really took hold in our current or former countries; thus the Croatian (or more specifically the Zagreb) school tried to shape new theories and practices, such as “antifilm”, while the Belgrade school struggled with the even looser term of “alternative film”." (from This is All Film! catalogue)

Artists[edit]

avant-garde
  • Esther Johnson with Vane Bor and Josip Slavenski, Belgrade's Mysteries (Les Mysteres de Belgarde, 1930s). Homage to Pearl White. During her European tour American pianist Esther Johnson visited Belgrade. Via the composer Josip Slavenski she gets in touch with Vane Bor and the three of them shoot her film project - film note(s) about Belgarde as one of the capitals. Slavenski and Bor are the founders of Filmska kulturna zadruga that "produces" the film; the camera is rented from the Aeroclub while Vane Bor serves as the guide around the town. The film is crisscross of distinctive, oblique visions of the city of an outsider and of maverick connoisseur. Belgrade's Mysteries later turns into real mystery as after the premiere the copy disappears and is never found again.
  • Slavko Vorkapić [10]
1950s-1960s - the second avant-garde
  • Marko Babac
  • Kokan Rakonjac
  • Živojin Pavlović, Triptych about Material and Death (Triptich o materiji i smrti, 1960). Produced at Akademski filmski klub.
  • Dragoljub Ivkov
  • Nikola Djurić
  • Ivko Šešić
  • Milorad Glušica
  • Black Wave (Crni val). Inspired by Italian Neorealism and various waves in European cinema, the authors of Black Wave rejected the norms and ideals of optimism and self-congratulatory official culture, and instead openly exposed the dark sides of socialist society - above all the truth of its hidden capitalist side that emerged with the implementation of market economy and its devastating social consequences, like unemployment, massive migrations of workers both within the country and abroad, poverty, crime, etc. Along with Želimir Žilnik prominent directors included Živojin Pavlović, Bata Čengić, Dušan Makavejev and Aleksandar Petrović. The article that introduced the term "Black Wave" was published in newspaper Borba in 1969. The journalist offered that the Black Wave in Yugoslavian films presented a "systematic distortion of the present, in which everything is viewed through a monochromatic lens. Its themes are obscure and present improper visions and images of violence, moral degeneracy, misery, lasciviousness and triviality."

Film theory[edit]

Dušan Stojanović

Centres[edit]

Amateur cinema clubs in Yugoslavia (or cine clubs) were the basic organizational units for amateur filmmakers. Originally they were formally dependent "film sections" of photo clubs, with the first photo clubs in the region organized in the late 19th century. After the Second World War, photographers and filmmakers often formed clubs together; one such example was the Janez Puhar Photo-Cinema Club in Kranj. Initially, photo clubs covered a wide range of activities and took on the role and responsibilities of cultural and educational institutions that had not yet been set up. Their scope was, however, limited: they provided premises for meetings, some equipment and materials, they organized courses and enabled their members to enter their works for festivals, which did not accept independent filmmakers. As amateur clubs had been the domain of the bourgeoisie before the war, an umbrella organization was set up for them after the Second World War, Popular Engineering Society (Ljudska tehnika). This was to ensure that representatives of the working class also joined the clubs and in part also to supervise the clubs for any potentially subversive activities. In the 1970s the clubs gradually became less significant, although some exist as associations to this day.

  • Belgrade Cinema Club (Kino klub Beograd) was founded in 1951 and was the center of film-related avant-garde and amateur activities. The Belgrade circle was characterized by the tendency to move away from the traditional model of "academic cinema", but not in the structuralist way as did Zagreb. In 1960s and 1970s for Belgrade authors like Dušan Makavejev, Živojin Pavlović, Marko Babac and Kokan Rakonjac, the Club served as the prelude to a professional film career. Belgrade filmmakers stressed the artist's right to individual expression and were largely inspired largely by surrealist and Russian film. Very soon they revealed a predilection for presenting reality in an "unembellished" form and offering a deep psychological motivation for their characters. Dušan Makavejev realized four short films: Jatagan Mala (1963), Pečat (The Seal, 1955), Spomenicima ne treba verovati (Don't Trust Monuments, 1958) and Antonijevo rozbijeno ogledalo (Anthony's Broken Mirror, 1957). Also Ivan Martinac realized his first films during his Belgrade studies in the Club.
  • Academic Film Center Belgrade (Akademski filmski centar Beograd). The Belgrade circle, gathered around the Academic Film Center founded by Predrag Čonkić in 1958, was characterized by the tendency to move away from the traditional model of "academic cinema", but not in the structuralist way of the Zagreb Center. Belgrade filmmakers stressed the artist's right to individual expression and were largely inspired largely by surrealist and Russian film. Very soon they revealed a predilection for presenting reality in an "unembellished" form and offering a deep psychological motivation for their characters. Thus the so-called Black Wave emerged, proposing pessimistic films offering a turbid image of reality, with central figures like Dušan Makavejev and Živojin Pavlović.
  • Kinoteka Belgrade, unofficial "open university" [11]

Festivals and exhibitions[edit]

In the 1960s and 1970s, experimental films were shown almost exclusively at various amateur film festivals organized under the auspices of the Photo-Cinema Association, which was part of the umbrella organization Popular Engineering Society (Ljudska tehnika). The festivals were in fact organized in a system that echoed that of the organizational structure of Ljudska technika or the federal state structure. The basic units in the system were cinema clubs, whose members could enter films for festival consideration; as a rule, filmmakers could not work independently, although there were some exceptions. Following an agreement with the Republic or Federal Subcommittee for Film of the Photo-Cinema Association the individual cinema club would then hold a festival. Initially, the festivals were divided into non-competitive reviews and competitive festivals and then structured hierarchically like the main organization into club, interclub, regional, republic-wide, and federal festivals. The latter two related, as only films that had been successful at the republican level could be entered for federal festivals. This restriction proved too harsh as the federal festival came to be seen as prestigious, and was abandoned in 1970. Although formally only events at club or interclub level, some of them were nonetheless held in high esteem, depending on the organization and the filmmakers they managed to attract. As a result, filmmakers valued GEFF, MAFAF, 8 mm in Novi Sad, the Alternative Film Festival in Split, and the Alternatives in Belgrade more than they did the federal festival.

  • Alternative Film & Video Festival Belgrade. The festival was held for the first time in 1982, as Alternative film, and intended to explore the domain of film production which is alternative to commercial film, all modes of alternative, experimental, art, short, radical film thinking… Since 1985 the festival went on as Alternative film/video, which establishes and further explores the double relation: of alternative - film and video - production to commercial and classic, but also the relation between film and video aesthetics and production. Discontinued in 1990, the festival was reestablished in 2003.
  • 8 mm Novi Sad (Marčevska osmica)
  • This Is All Film! Experimental Film in Yugoslavia 1951-1991, 2010-2011, Museum of Modern Art Ljubljana

Archives[edit]

Archive of Alternative Film and Video at Academic Film Club Belgrade, head: Ivko Šešić [12]

Literature[edit]

  • Alternativni film u Beogradu od 1950. do 1990. godine [Elektronski izvor] : vreme kino klubova : zbornik priloga za buduća istraživanja / [priredio] Miroslav-Bata Petrović. - Novi Beograd : Dom kulture „Studentski grad“, Arhiv alternativnog filma i videa, 2009 (Beograd : Pink digital system). - 1 elektronski optički disk (DVD) : tekst, slika; 12cm. - (Biblioteka „Istorija alternativnog filma“), ISBN 978-86-7933-052-9.
  • "Uncharted Serbia: The Avant-Garde of the Kino Clubs", film selection with an introduction, 2009. [13]
  • Božidar Zečević, Srpska avangarda i film 1920-1932, Belgrade: Akademski filmski centar/Dom kulture Studentski grad, 2014, 390 pp. (Serbian)
  • Nevena Daković, "The Unfilmable Scenario and Neglected Theory: Yugoslav Film Avant-Garde: 1895-1992" published in the Impossible Histoires (Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991) edited by Dubravka Djuric and Misko Suvakovic (MIT Press: 2003), pp 466-489
  • "Experimental Ex-Yu", film selection with an introduction, 2009. [14]
  • Ana Janevski (ed.): As Soon as I Open My Eyes I See a Film. Experiment in the Art of Yugoslavia in the 1960s and 1970s, Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw, 2010. With essays by Ana Janevski (on experimental art and film in Yugoslavia), Stevan Vuković (on political upheaval in 1968 in Belgrade), and Łukasz Ronduda (on contacts between Yugoslav and Polish artists in the 1970s). [15] Interview with Ana Janevski, June 2011
  • Bojana Piškur et al (eds.), This Is All Film: Experimental Film in Yugoslavia 1951-1991 [Vse to je film: Eksperimentalni film v Jugoslaviji 1951-1991], catalogue, Museum of Modern Art, Ljubljana, 2010. 154 pages. ISBN: 9789612060909
  • Pavle Levi, Cinema by Other Means, Oxford University Press, 2012, 224 pp. [16]

Action art, happening, performance, body art[edit]

Branko Vučićević [17]

Events[edit]

  • Bitef (Belgrade International Theater Festival), *1968, performance and theatre festival

Literature[edit]

Serbia
Yugoslavia

Visual poetry, Concrete poetry, Lettrism[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • Dubravka Đurić, "Radical Poetic Practices: Concrete and Visual Poetry in the Avant-garde and Neo-avant-garde", in Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, eds. Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković, MIT Press, 2003, pp 64-95. (English)

Conceptual art[edit]

Literature[edit]

Serbia
Yugoslavia
  • Oltari avangarde, eds. Jadran Adamović and Marina Viculin, Zagreb: Galerija Klovićevi dvori, 2008, 32 pp. Catalogue. (Croatian)

Geometric abstraction, Neo-constructivism, Op art, Kinetic art[edit]

Literature[edit]

Serbia
Yugoslavia
  • The New Art Practice in Yugoslavia, 1966-1978, ed. Marijan Susovski, Zagreb: Gallery of Contemporary Art, 1978, 148 pp. Catalogue. (English)/(Serbo-Croatian)
  • Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, eds. Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković, MIT Press, 2003, 520 pp. [18] (English)

Mail art[edit]

Andrej Tisma

Sound art[edit]

Artists[edit]

Katalin Ladik

Works[edit]

  • At the 'October '71' exhibition at Skc Gallery, Marina Abramovic created a public sound art piece, the first of its kind in Yugoslavia, Birds Twittering in the Tree, which consisted of a loudspeaker perched in a tree outside SKC that projected the sounds of birds chirping. Inside she created a series of sound boxes with the sounds of Bleeting(sic), Moaning, and A Shot. She created a number of Sound Spaces in 1972, which were meant to provoke shock in the audience. For one of her Sound Spaces, sounds of the body seemed to inhabit open empty room punctuated by light beams and surrounded by white drapes. Video and sound were recorded and immediately played back so that the recorded activity was of equal importance to the live action. Abramovic’s sound pieces created for 'October '72' imitated the destruction of buildings while she aimed floodlights at the actual standing building of the SKC. Airport Sound Environment featured the voice of an airport announcer. Circular Space was the echo of a wire strung through the space.

Electroacoustic music[edit]

Composers[edit]

Works[edit]

  • Radovanović, Polifonija (Polyphony), Sferoon (Spheroon), Evolucija (Evolution), Vokalinstra (Vocalinstra). Works utilising the concept of hyperpolyphony.
  • Radovanović, Elektronska studija (Electronic Study), Sonora, Audiospacijal for female chorus and electronics (Audiospatial, 1978), Timbral. Electro-acoustic works.
  • Hofman, Hexagons cycle (1974–1978), serial music.
  • Stefanović, Whither with the Bird on the Palm (Kuda sa pticom na dlanu, 1980), for percussion and tape, made at Ircam in Paris.
  • Hofman, Déja vu (1985). Electro-acoustic work with the use of collage.
  • Miljković, E silentio for voice, prepared piano, strings and tape (1987). She created a subtle atmosphere, mixing sound and noise in her minimalist and repetitive works.
  • Hofman, Musica concertante for piano, strings and electronic devices (1993), introduced rock music pulsations and paraphrased the concerto as a genre belonging to the past.
  • Paranosić, Scarabeus for electronics (1994)
  • Radovanović, Constellations (Sazveždja, 1997), a complex work for mixed electronics, in which three components belonging to different media are active: the sound, visual and kinetic.

Events[edit]

  • Permanent Art exhibition, 212 Gallery, September 1968, included electronic music, concrete music, experimental film, and computer art, based on the ideas of multiples and technologies of reproduction. Curated by Biljana Tomić.

Studios[edit]

Releases[edit]

  • Radovanović, Pignon, Devčić, Kalčič – Elektronski Studio Radio Beograda. PGP RTB, 1977. [24]
  • Various – Elektronski Studio Radio Beograda. PGP RTB, 3130037, 1985. [25]
  • Various – 30 Godina Elektronskog Studija Radio Beograda - Elektroakustička Muzika I - Izbor Dela Ostvarenih Od 1972. Do 2000. Godine. PGP RTS, CD 431333, 2002. [26]

Literature[edit]

  • Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, "Stvaralačko prisustvo evropske avangarde u nas" [The Creative Presence of the European Avant-Garde in Serbian Music], Belgrade, Univerzitet umetnosti, 1983.
  • Vladan Radovanović, Vokovizuel (Vocovisual), Belgrade, Nolit, 1987.
  • Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, "Fragment o muzičkoj postmoderni" [Fragment on Musical Postmodernism], Novi Sad, Matica srpska, 1997.
  • Vladan Radovanović, “Srpska avangarda u odlasku od muzike (1955–1980)” [Serbian Avant-garde in the Process of Leaving Music (1955–1980)], Gradina, 10, 1984, pp. 5–37
  • Melita Milin, "Serbian Music of the Second Half of the 20th Century: From Socialist Realism to Postmodernism", in: Katy Romanou (ed.), Serbian and Greek art music: a patch to Western music history, Intellect Books, 2009, pp 82-97.
  • Sintezijska umetnost Vladana Radovanovića [The Synthesic Art of Vladan Radovanović] monograph for his retrospective, 2005. Includes collection of essays by Dejan Đorić (The Founder of the Serbian Avant-Garde), Ješa Denegri, Nikola Šuica (on vocovisual), Ivan Rastegorac (On the Recording of Dreams and the Literary Works of Vladan Radovanović), Melita Milin (Metamusic and Music of Vladan Radovanović), Vladan Radovanović (Sintezijska umetnost / Synthesic Art); and catalogue of works. [27] [28]
  • Mirjana Veselinović-Hofman, "Problems and Paradoxes of Yugoslav Avant-garde Music (Outlines for a Reinterpretation)" published in Impossible Histoires (Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991) edited by Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković (MIT Press: 2003), pp 404-441
  • Ivana Janković [Medić], "Sintezijska umetnost Vladana Radovanovića" [Vladan Radovanović's 'synthesic art'], Muzikologija 3, 2003, pp 141-186. (Serbian) [29] [30]
  • Vladan Radovanović, Muzika i Elektroakustička Muzika, Izdavačka knjižarnica Zorana Stojanovića, Novi Sad, 2010.

Computer and computer-aided art[edit]

Artists[edit]

Vladan Radovanović (computer graphics works since 1988), Petar Milojević (emigrated to Canada in 1960), Zoran Radović (emigrated to Berlin in 1973)

Events[edit]

  • Permanent Art exhibition, 212 Gallery, September 1968, included electronic music, concrete music, experimental film, and computer art, based on the ideas of multiples and technologies of reproduction. Curated by Biljana Tomić.

Video art[edit]

Video-yu-1970s.png

Artists[edit]

Events[edit]

Video-yu-events-1970s.png

  • April Meetings (Aprilski sustreti - festival proširenih medija; April Meetings - Festival of Expanded Media; later "Video Meetings") were founded in 1972 on the occasion of April 4, Students' Day, in Belgrade and on the day of the opening of the Students Cultural Center. Characteristic of April Meetings organized between 1972 and 1977 was an interdisciplinary artistic program conceived in the spirit of the time with the goal of transcending the boundaries betwen art forms (video, performance, photography). April Meetings proved so successful in this respect that the need which had originally given rise to the festival was soon fulfilled and the festival was abandoned in favor of other programs. But the concept of several-day multidisciplinary events bringing together great numbers of (predominately young) artists from various fields had proven so successful it continued to be applied elsewhere.
  • Videomedeja, annual video festival in Novi Sad, since 1996
  • 'Elements of Normality. Video-documents and video-performances from Serbia in the 1990s', Cultural Centre Babel, Utrecht, 2006. Curated by Branislava Anđelković, Dejan Sretenović, and Branislav Dimitrijević. [31] [32]

Centres[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • Dejan Sretenović, "Video Art in Serbia". POGLED /VIEW/ series, Centre for Contemporary Art, Belgrade, 1999.
  • Barbara Borčić, "Video Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism" published in Impossible Histoires (Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991) edited by Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković (MIT Press: 2003), pp 490-524. [33] [34] [35]
  • VIDEOGRAFIJA regiona = Videography of the Region : 2006-2009 : [katalog projekta = project catalogue] / [priređivač, edited by Aleksandra Sekulić]. - Beograd : Dom kulture “Studentski grad”, 2009 (Beograd : Alta Nova). - 245 str. : ilustr. ; 24 cm [36]
  • Marijan Susovski, "Video u Jugoslaviji", Spot, no. 10, Zagreb 1977.
  • Raša Todosijević, Video, Videosfera: video/društvo/umetnost ("The Video: Videosphere: video/society/art"), Studentski izdavački centar, ed. Mihailo Ristić, Belgrade 1986.
  • Mihailo Ristić (ed.), Video, Videosfera: video/društvo/umetnost (The Video: Videosphere: video/society/art), Studentski izdavački centar, Belgrade 1986. Anthology of theoretical texts about video, including contributions from video-makers.
  • Barbara Borčić, "Video Art from Conceptualism to Postmodernism" published in Impossible Histoires (Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991) edited by Dubravka Đurić and Miško Šuvaković (MIT Press: 2003), pp 490-524. [37] [38] [39]

New media art, Media culture[edit]

Cities[edit]

Belgrade, Niš, Novi Sad, Pančevo.

Literature[edit]

Serbia
  • Dejan Sretenovic lecture on Media Art in Serbia, MonteVideo/Amsterdam, 2 May 2000. [40]
  • Branka Curcic, "The constant state of emergency: Report from Serbian media scene", 2003. [41]
  • Zana Poliakov, "Think in layers: Piracy dilemma in Serbia", ISEA Newsletter #93, 2003. [42]
Yugoslavia

Art theory and art history[edit]

László Kerekes, Ješa Denegri, Irina Subotić, Dejan Sretenović, Stevan Vuković, Biljana Tomić, Miško Šuvaković, Branimir_Stojanović, Kristian Lukić


Countries
avant-garde, modernism and after

Albania, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Central and Eastern Europe, Chile, China, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kosova, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Slovenia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States