London Bulletin

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London Bulletin was a magazine edited by E.L.T. Mesens and published by London Gallery in London in 20 numbers between April 1938 and June 1940.

The magazine had been the most influential English Surrealist periodical. Each issue published had different colour wrappers and titles in various colours with varying number of pages, although the size 250 x 190 mm was consistent. Although it described itself as an avant-garde review, Surrealist contributions predominated; the periodical also featured Constructivism and more abstract art. Contributors included Paul Eluard, Herbert Read, E.L.T. Mesens, André Breton, Nash, Tanguy, Samuel Beckett, Peret, Francis Picabia, George Reavey, Humphrey Jennings, Roland Penrose, Eileen Agar, John Banting, Conroy Maddox and many others.

Issues[edit]

London Bulletin 1 (Apr 1938). PDF.
London Bulletin 2 (May 1938). PDF.
London Bulletin 3 (Jun 1938). PDF.
London Bulletin 4-5 (Jul 1938). PDF.
London Bulletin 6 (Oct 1938). PDF.
London Bulletin 7 (Dec 1938-Jan 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 8-9 (Jan-Feb 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 10 (Feb 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 11 (1 Mar 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 12 (15 Mar 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 13 (15 Apr 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 14 (1 May 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 15-16 (15 May 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 17 (15 Jun 1939). PDF.
London Bulletin 18-20 (Jun 1940). PDF.

The above PDFs are sourced from Bibliothèque Kandinsky.


Avant-garde and modernist magazines

Poesia (1905-09, 1920), Der Sturm (1910-32), Blast (1914-15), The Egoist (1914-19), The Little Review (1914-29), 291 (1915-16), MA (1916-25), De Stijl (1917-20, 1921-32), Dada (1917-21), Noi (1917-25), 391 (1917-24), Zenit (1921-26), Broom (1921-24), Veshch/Gegenstand/Objet (1922), Die Form (1922, 1925-35), Contimporanul (1922-32), Secession (1922-24), Klaxon (1922-23), Merz (1923-32), LEF (1923-25), G (1923-26), Irradiador (1923), Sovremennaya architektura (1926-30), Novyi LEF (1927-29), ReD (1927-31), Close Up (1927-33), transition (1927-38).