Difference between revisions of "Monoskop"

From Monoskop
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Line 16: Line 16:
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  
[[Image:Rossi_Aldo_1976_La_citta_analoga.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Architecture|Collection of source documents in the history, theory and criticism of 20th-century architecture]]]]
+
[[Image:Russolo_intonorumori_1913.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Noise|Writings on noise]] ]]
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  
Line 46: Line 46:
  
 
[[Image:Henri_Saint-Simon.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Saint-Simon|Bibliography of the works of Henri Saint-Simon (1760-1825)]] ]]
 
[[Image:Henri_Saint-Simon.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Saint-Simon|Bibliography of the works of Henri Saint-Simon (1760-1825)]] ]]
 +
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 +
 +
[[Image:Leibniz_BN_38895_Rechenmaschine-Nachbau.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Leibniz|The life and works of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716)]] ]]
  
  
 
|style="width: 285px; vertical-align: top;"|
 
|style="width: 285px; vertical-align: top;"|
[[Image:MA_8_1_15_Oct_1922_back_cover.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Magazines|Guide to 150+ avant-garde and modernist magazines online]] ]]
+
[[Image:Buren_Mosset_Parmentier_Toroni_1967_Photo-souvenir_Manifestation_3.jpg|thumb|258px|[[Art|Guide to 350 styles and movements in modern and contemporary art worldwide.]] ]]
 +
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 +
 
 +
[[Image:Rossi_Aldo_1976_La_citta_analoga.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Architecture|Collection of source documents in the history, theory and criticism of 20th-century architecture]]]]
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  
Line 83: Line 89:
  
 
[[Image:Baruch_Spinoza.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Spinoza|The works of Baruch Spinoza (1632-77), with short annotations, reviews, and an account of his life by Gilles Deleuze.]] ]]
 
[[Image:Baruch_Spinoza.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Spinoza|The works of Baruch Spinoza (1632-77), with short annotations, reviews, and an account of his life by Gilles Deleuze.]] ]]
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
 
[[Image:Leibniz_BN_38895_Rechenmaschine-Nachbau.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Leibniz|The life and works of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716)]] ]]
 
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  
Line 105: Line 108:
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  
[[Image:Russolo_intonorumori_1913.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Noise|Writings on noise]] ]]
+
[[Image:MA_8_1_15_Oct_1922_back_cover.jpg|thumb|250px|[[Magazines|Guide to 150+ avant-garde and modernist magazines online]] ]]
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
 
<div style="clear:both"></div><br>
  

Revision as of 16:56, 23 May 2016

Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed overview see the Recent, Contents, Index and Media library sections. Updates are also being posted on Twitter and Facebook.

Monoskop supports the open letter In solidarity with Library Genesis and Sci-Hub.

Recent entries




































The works of Gilles Deleuze (1925-95) and Félix Guattari (1930-92).






Recent entries on Monoskop Log

SFRA Review, 50(2-3): Alternative Sinofuturisms (2020)

“The idea for this special issue developed out of a workshop organized by Dino Ge Zhang as part of the WuDaoKou Futurists collective, a collective aimed at decentering Sinofuturism from its Western articulations. The workshop, “Alternative Sinofuturisms,” already presupposes Sinofuturism as a venue for alterity and retains a space for various approaches and understandings of who and what is being foregrounded. Centralized in Beijing but held online with invited speakers from four different continents, the workshop was organized around a series of provocations, most of which are included in this issue.”

Contributors: Loïc Aloisio and Gwennaël Gaffric, Virginia L. Conn, Gabriele de Seta, Margaret A. Fisher, Carmen Herold, Amy Ireland, Lyu Guangzhao, Astrid Møller-Olsen, Yen Ooi, Frederike Schneider-Vielsäcker, Molly Silk, Mitchell van Vuren, Dino Ge Zhang.

Edited by Virginia L. Conn
Publisher Science Fiction Research Association, Spring-Summer 2020
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISSN 2641-2837
pages 66-181

HTML
PDF, PDF

Robin Blaetz (ed.): Women’s Experimental Cinema: Critical Frameworks (2007)

Women’s Experimental Cinema provides lively introductions to the work of fifteen avant-garde women filmmakers, some of whom worked as early as the 1950s and many of whom are still working today. In each essay in this collection, a leading film scholar considers a single filmmaker, supplying biographical information, analyzing various influences on her work, examining the development of her corpus, and interpreting a significant number of individual films. The essays rescue the work of critically neglected but influential women filmmakers for teaching, further study, and, hopefully, restoration and preservation. Just as importantly, they enrich the understanding of feminism in cinema and expand the terrain of film history.

The contributors examine the work of Marie Menken, Joyce Wieland, Gunvor Nelson, Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneemann, Barbara Rubin, Amy Greenfield, Barbara Hammer, Chick Strand, Marjorie Keller, Leslie Thornton, Abigail Child, Peggy Ahwesh, Su Friedrich, and Cheryl Dunye. The essays highlight the diversity in these filmmakers’ forms and methods, covering topics such as how Menken used film as a way to rethink the transition from abstract expressionism to Pop Art in the 1950s and 1960s, how Rubin both objectified the body and investigated the filmic apparatus that enabled that objectification in her film Christmas on Earth (1963), and how Dunye uses film to explore her own identity as a black lesbian artist. At the same time, the essays reveal commonalities, including a tendency toward documentary rather than fiction and a commitment to nonhierarchical, collaborative production practices. The volume’s final essay focuses explicitly on teaching women’s experimental films, addressing logistical concerns (how to acquire the films and secure proper viewing spaces) and extending the range of the book by suggesting alternative films for classroom use.”

Contributors: Paul Arthur, Robin Blaetz, Noël Carroll, Janet Cutler, Mary Ann Doane, Robert A. Haller, Chris Holmlund, Chuck Kleinhans, Scott MacDonald, Kathleen McHugh, Ara Osterweil, Maria Pramaggiore, Melissa Ragona, Kathryn Ramey, M. M. Serra, Maureen Turim, William C. Wees.

Publisher Duke University Press, Durham, NC, 2007
Open access
ISBN 9780822340232, 0822340232
viii+421 pages

Reviews: Harriet Margolis (NWSA Journal, 2009), Beth Hutchison (Signs, 2009), Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 2011), Jan-Christopher Horak (Screening the Past, 2008), David Sterritt (Cineaste, 2008), Phoebe Hart (M/C Reviews, 2008).

Publisher
OAPEN
WorldCat

PDF, PDF

Steina: Machine Vision (1978–)

<video id="video22683" controls="" playsinline="" autoplay="" muted="" width="320" height="240"><source src="https://vasulka.multiplace.org/Steina/movies/MOV_MachineVision/MachineVision_T1.mov.webm" type="video/webm"></video>

An electro-opto-mechanical environment by Steina, with instrumentation by Josef Krames, Woody Vasulka, and Bruce Hamilton. First shown at the Vasulkas exhibition at Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY, 1978.

“When a human being operates the camera, the assumption is that the camera is an extension of the eye. You move the camera the way you move the head and the body. In video, unlike photography or film, the viewfinder is not necessarily an integral part of the camera apparatus. … In the late 1970s, I began a series of environments titled Machine Vision and Allvision, with a mirrored sphere. Another variation has a motorized moving mirror in front of the camera so that depending on the horizontal or vertical positioning of the mirror, the video monitor displays a continuous pan or tilt either back/forth or up/down. A third variation is a continuous rotation through a turning prism, while still another has a zoom lens in continuing motion, in/out. These automatic motions simulate all possible camera movements freeing the human eye from being the central point of the universe.” (Steina)

Recorded at the Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome, 1994/1995

Artist statement and documentation (artist’s website archive with restored videos)

WEBM (42 MB)

Chris Robé: Breaking the Spell: A History of Anarchist Filmmakers, Videotape Guerrillas, and Digital Ninjas (2017)

Breaking the Spell offers the first full-length study that charts the historical trajectory of anarchist-inflected video activism from the late 1960s to the present. Two predominant trends emerge from this social movement-based video activism: 1) anarchist-inflected processes increasingly structure its production, distribution, and exhibition practices; and 2) video does not simply represent collective actions and events, but also serves as a form of activist practice in and of itself from the moment of recording to its later distribution and exhibition. Video plays an increasingly important role among activists in the growing global resistance against neoliberal capitalism. As various radical theorists have pointed out, subjectivity itself becomes a key terrain of struggle as capitalism increasingly structures and mines it through social media sites, cell phone technology, and new “flexible” work and living patterns. As a result, alternative media production becomes a central location where new collective forms of subjectivity can be created to challenge aspects of neoliberalism.

Chris Robé’s book fills in historical gaps by bringing to light unexplored video activist groups like the Cascadia Forest Defenders, eco-video activists from Eugene, Oregon; Mobile Voices, Latino day laborers harnessing cell phone technology to combat racism and police harassment in Los Angeles; and Outta Your Backpack Media, indigenous youth from the Southwest who use video to celebrate their culture and fight against marginalization. This groundbreaking study also deepens our understanding of more well-researched movements like AIDS video activism, Paper Tiger Television, and Indymedia by situating them within a longer history and wider context of radical video activism.”

Publisher PM Press, Oakland, CA, 2017
ISBN 9781629632339, 1629632333
x+469 pages

Interview with author: The New Architects (video, 2017, 43 min).
Reviews: Beth Geglia (Interface, 2017), Franklin Lopez (Fifth Estate, 2017), Patricia R. Zimmerman (Jump Cut, 2018), Allan Atliff (Anarchist Studies, 2017).

Author
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (16 MB)
Academia.edu (author)

Suely Rolnik: Esferas da insurreição: notas para uma vida não cafetinada (2018–) [BR-PT, ES]

“Este livro é como uma belíssima larva que cresce no esterco: a ondulação e a suavidade aveludada do pensamento de Suely Rolnik, seu riso contagioso, a falta de vergonha e de medo lhe permite entrar nas camadas mais obscuras do fascismo contemporâneo, nos guiar nos lugares que mais nos aterrorizam e tirar dali algo com o que construir um horizonte de vida coletiva, uma artista cuja matéria é a pulsão. Uma cultivadora dos bichos-da-seda da “izquierda bajo la piel”. Não se pode pedir mais de uma escritora: devir-larva, cartografar a lama com a mesma precisão com que outro cartografaria uma mina de ouro. Por isso, leitores, adentrem com essa larva no magma da besta e busquem os germens da vida que, ainda que desconheçam, os rodeiam, e que, com uma torção do olhar, poderiam ser seus – poderia ser sua própria vida.” (Paul B. Preciado)

Preface by Paul B. Preciado
Publisher n-1, São Paulo, 2018
ISBN 9788566943597, 8566943597
206 pages

Reviews: Tiago da Silva Porto (IDE, 2019, BR-PT), Alessandra Aparecida Dias Aguiar & Pedro Xavier Russo Bonetto (Filos.e Educ., 2020, BR-PT), Nazaret Castro Buzon (Amazonas, 2019, ES), Maximiliano Reyes (Enclave Comuhae, 2019, ES), Gabriela Cornet (Recial, 2020, ES).

Publisher (BR)
Publisher (ES)
WorldCat (BR)

Esferas da insurreição (BR-Portuguese, 2018)
Esferas de la insurrección (Spanish, trans. Cecilia Palmeiro, Marcia Cabrera, and Damian Kraus, 2019)