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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed overview see the Recent, Contents, Index and Media library sections. Updates are also being posted on Twitter and Facebook.

Monoskop supports the open letter In solidarity with Library Genesis and Sci-Hub.

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Works of Gilles Deleuze (1925-95) and Félix Guattari (1930-92).






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Poetry, Film, Humor: Narratives of Exception in the Years of Autarky (2017) [EN, ES]

“The years around World War, which was undoubtedly the most difficult phase of Franco’s dictatorship, also served as the back-drop for the development of a new avant-garde culture in Spain. Its birth is traditionally cited by art historians as taking place between 1947 and 1948, when groups such as Dau al Set in Barcelona and Pórtico in Zaragoza appeared or resumed their activities. The persistence, even today, of certain attitudes and poetics characteristic of that generation of artists as well as their extensive representation in the collection of the Museo Reina Sofía has made this period into one of the museum’s principal areas of research. As a result, it is essential for the museum to dig deeper in its analysis and critial (re)interpretation of this time.

With the restructuring and enlargement of the rooms devoted to this period, along with the present publication, the Museo Reina Sofía’s Collections Deaprtment seeks to significantly broaden the investigative scope traditionally applied to the visual culture of this period in Spain’s recent history.”

Publisher Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2017
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License
ISBN 9788480265461
279 pages

Publisher

Poetry, Film, Humor: Narratives of Exception in the Years of Autarky (English, 2017, 32 MB, via)
Poesía, cine y humor. Relatos de excepción en los años de autarquía (Spanish, 2017, 33 MB, via)

CCRU: Abstract Culture, 4: Digital Hyperstition (1999)

Digital Hyperstition is the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit’s definitive work of indisciplinary microcultural agitation. This explosive document brings together recovered hyperstitional episodes reported by Melanie Newton, Echidna Stillwell, and other students and victims of Lemurian time sorcery, with texts on popular numerics, afromathematics, polyrhythmic aquassassination, and Y2K panic. Also contains a presentation of Pandemonium, the complete system of time sorcery, authoritative rules for the games of Decadence and Subdecadence, and an invaluable CCRU glossary.”

Publisher CCRU, London, 1999
74 pages

Distributor

PDF (14 MB)
HTML (use menu at the bottom right)

Katy Deepwell (ed.): Feminist Art Manifestos: An Anthology (2014)

“What is a manifesto? A political programme, a declaration, a definitive statement of belief. Neither institutional mission statement, nor religious dogma; neither a poem, nor a book. As a form of literature, manifestos occupy a specific place in the history of public discourse as a means to communicate radical ideas. Distributed as often ephemeral documents, as leaflets or pamphlets in political campaigns or as announcements of the formation of new parties or new avant-gardes, manifestos above all declare what its authors are for and against, and ask people who read them to join them, to understand, to share these ideas. The feminist art manifestos in this anthology do all of these things as they explore the potential and possibilities of women’s cultural production as visual artists.”

Publisher KT press, London, 2014
ISBN 9780992693435
132 pages

Reviews: Susan Ballard and Agnieszka Golda (Australian Feminist Studies, 2015), Monika Kaiser (FKW, 2015, DE).

Publisher

HTML

Tribune Tower Competition, 2 vols. (1923/1980)

In 1922, 75th anniversary of the Chicago Tribune, co-publishers Robert R. McCormick and Joseph M. Patterson announced a design contest for the newspaper’s new quarters in hopes of creating an architectural representation of the radical philosophies held by the editors. The competition was thought to represent the contemporaneous state of architecture and has always been regarded as a milestone of American architecture and a point of first contacts with interwar European avant-gardes. The contestants, who came form all over the world, borrowed freely from the Greeks, Romans, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

The winner was a neo-Gothic design by New York architects John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood, with buttresses near the top. The entry that many perceived as the best, by the Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen, took second place. Saarinen’s tower was preferred by architects like Louis Sullivan, and was a strong influence on the next generation of skyscrapers including Raymond Hood’s own subsequent work on the McGraw-Hill Building and Rockefeller Center. The 1929 Gulf Building in Houston, Texas, designed by architects Alfred C. Finn, Kenneth Franzheim, and J. E. R. Carpenter, is a close realization of that Saarinen design. Other Tribune tower entries by figures like Walter Gropius, Bertram Goodhue, Bruno Taut, and Adolf Loos remain intriguing suggestions of what might have been, but perhaps not as intriguing as the one surmounted by Rushmore-like head of an American Indian. The book contains documentation of all 281 entries from 23 countries.

The 1980 counterpart to the Tribune competition was not intended as a competition at all, but as an exhibition of architects from all over the world. Unlike the original competition, this was an invitation only endeavor, and over 100 architects were invited. The exhibition, The Late Entries to the Chicago Tribune Competition, was an idea by architect Ben Weese further developed by architects Stanley Tigerman, Stuart E. Cohen and the owner of the Young Hoffman Gallery in Chicago, Rhona Hoffman. Participants were asked to present a point of view or theoretical position, as well as represent a cross-section of progressive western thought. The outcome was that the styles, media, colors and intentions ranged greatly. Submissions to Late Entries did not limit themselves to functional buildings, but also to metaphorical and imaginary designs, and included designs by Tadao Ando, Frank Gehry, Helmut Jahn, Gaetano Pesce, Bernard Tschumi, Lebbeus Woods and many others.

Volume 1 first published as The International Competition for a New Administrative Building for the Chicago Tribune, MCMXXII: Containing All the Designs Submitted in Response to the Chicago Tribune’s $100,000 Offer Commemorating Its Seventy Fifth Anniversary, June 10, 1922, Tribune Company, 1923.

Volume 2 by Stanley Tigerman; with an Introduction by Stuart E. Cohen; and Critical Essays by George Baird, Juan Pablo Bonta, Charles Jecks, Vincent Scully and Norris Kelly Smith.

Publisher Academy Editions, London, 1980
189 & 113 pages
via aldo coffee

Commentary: Paul Gapp (Chicago Tribune, 1980).
Wikipedia

WorldCat

Volume 1 (1923/1980, 222 MB)
Late Entries (Volume 2) (1980, 104 MB, pages 64-79 missing)

Silvia Federici: Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle (2012–) [EN, ES]

“Written between 1974 and 2012, Revolution at Point Zero collects forty years of research and theorizing on the nature of housework, social reproduction, and women’s struggles on this terrain—to escape it, to better its conditions, to reconstruct it in ways that provide an alternative to capitalist relations.

Indeed, as Federici reveals, behind the capitalist organization of work and the contradictions inherent in “alienated labor” is an explosive ground zero for revolutionary practice upon which are decided the daily realities of our collective reproduction.

Beginning with Federici’s organizational work in the Wages for Housework movement, the essays collected here unravel the power and politics of wide but related issues including the international restructuring of reproductive work and its effects on the sexual division of labor, the globalization of care work and sex work, the crisis of elder care, the development of affective labor, and the politics of the commons.”

Publisher PM Press, Oakland, CA, and Common Notions, Brooklyn, NY, 2012
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 Unported License
ISBN 9781604863338, 1604863331
188 pages

Reviews: Joshua Eichen (Mute, 2012), Nicholas Beuret (Red Pepper, 2012), Ashley Bohrer (spectrezine, 2012), Seth Sandronsky (Z Magazine, 2012), Dayna Tortorici (n+1, 2013), Laura Schwartz (Labor & Society, 2013), Emma Dowling (Feminist Review, 2014), Danielle DiNovelli-Lang (Alternate Routes, 2014), Marina Vishmidt (J Cultural Economy, 2015), Sutapa Chattopadhyay (Capitalism Nature Socialism, 2015), Leontina M. Hormel (Monthly Review, 2016).

Publisher
WorldCat

Revolution at Point Zero (English, 2012, EPUB, MOBI)
Revolución en punto cero (Spanish, trans. Carlos Fernández Guervós and Paula Martín Ponz, 2013)