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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed overview see the Recent, Contents, Index and Media library sections. Updates are also being posted on Twitter and Facebook.

Monoskop supports the open letter In solidarity with Library Genesis and Sci-Hub.

Recent entries




































Works of Gilles Deleuze (1925-95) and Félix Guattari (1930-92).






Monoskop Log

Abigail De Kosnik: Rogue Archives: Digital Cultural Memory and Media Fandom (2016)

“The task of archiving was once entrusted only to museums, libraries, and other institutions that acted as repositories of culture in material form. But with the rise of digital networked media, a multitude of self-designated archivists—fans, pirates, hackers—have become practitioners of cultural preservation on the Internet. These nonprofessional archivists have democratized cultural memory, building freely accessible online archives of whatever content they consider suitable for digital preservation. In Rogue Archives, Abigail De Kosnik examines the practice of archiving in the transition from print to digital media, looking in particular at Internet fan fiction archives.

De Kosnik explains that media users today regard all of mass culture as an archive, from which they can redeploy content for their own creations. Hence, “remix culture” and fan fiction are core genres of digital cultural production. De Kosnik explores, among other things, the anticanonical archiving styles of Internet preservationists; the volunteer labor of online archiving; how fan archives serve women and queer users as cultural resources; archivists’ efforts to attract racially and sexually diverse content; and how digital archives adhere to the logics of performance more than the logics of print. She also considers the similarities and differences among free culture, free software, and fan communities, and uses digital humanities tools to quantify and visualize the size, user base, and rate of growth of several online fan archives.”

Publisher MIT Press, 2016
ISBN 9780262034661, 0262034662
x+430 pages

Reviews: Jan Baetens (Leonardo, 2017), Amanda Gilroy (PopMatters, 2017), Ludi Price (2016), Silvia Bertolotti (DigiCult, 2016).
Interview with author: Henry Jenkins (2016).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (10 MB)

Thomas McEvilley: The Triumph of Anti-Art: Conceptual and Performance Art in the Formation of Post-Modernism (2005)

“From roughly 1965 to 1980, Conceptual Art and Performance Art took center stage throughout the western world, introducing new and complex ideas to the practice of contemporary art which reverberate to this day. Thomas McEvilley’s The Triumph of Anti-Art not only explains the origins of these controversial and compelling art forms, but also uncovers many relatively unrecognized yet indisputably important artists, American and European. He guides the reader through a thicket of seemingly arcane meanings of these nonrepresentational art form, and brings clarity to the intentions and agendas of these artists, as well as to their real world contexts. The long-term effects of “anti-art,” and the development of the pluralistic situation known as post-Modernism, are described in vivid detail.

From the Greek philosopher Diogenes, through the 19th-century German romantic tradition, to the modern art critic Clement Greenberg, McEvilley traces philosophical ideas and political impulses that temporarily led to a toppling of painting and sculpture in the decades right after World War II. Following an overview of Modernism and Marcel Duchamp’s influence, a chapter on Yves Klein sets the state for surveys of Conceptual Art and its practitioners, including Bernar Venet, John Baldessari, and Francis Alys. McEvilley then gives equal focus to Performance Art with chapters on Andy Warhol, Brian O’Doherty, and Marina Abramovic and Ulay, among others. At the end of the volume the “triumph” of “anti-art” is explored in depth, as are the origins of the terms, practices, and politics of global art history.”

Publisher McPherson & Co., Kingston, N.Y., 2005
ISBN 0929701674, 9780929701677
391 pages

Reviews: Publishers Weekly (2005), Lisa Paul Streitfeld (NY Arts, 2006).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (73 MB)

Marta Traba: Art of Latin America, 1900-1980 (1994) [Spanish, English]

“Marta Traba, one of Latin America’s most controversial art critics, examines the works of over 1,000 artists from the first 80 years of the 20th century. This book is an indispensable reference for anyone interested in studying the evolution of Latin American art.”

Publisher Inter-American Development Bank, Washington, DC, 1994
ISBN 0940602717, 9780940602717
xiv+178 pages
via publisher

Review: Carolyn Kay (Canadian J LatAm Caribbean Studies, 1994).

Publisher
WorldCat

Arte de América Latina, 1900-1980 (Spanish, 1994, 21 MB)
Art of Latin America, 1900-1980 (English, 1994, 22 MB)

Marta Traba: Arte latinoamericano actual (1972) [Spanish]

In this book, Marta Traba examines how the growing influence of American art shaped the art of Latin America during the 1950s and 1960s, and how Latin American artists have both succumbed and resisted the effects of this influence.

Publisher Ediciones de la Biblioteca Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas, 1972
Nuevos Planteamientos series, 10
117 pages
via ICAA Docs

WorldCat

PDF (5 MB)

Francis D. Klingender: Art and the Industrial Revolution (1947–) [EN, IT, ES]

A classic of Marxist art history.

“Drawing on his unique command of the contemporary visual and literary record, Francis Klingender analyzes and documents the inter-reaction between the sociological, scientific and cultural changes that moulded the 19th century. His subjects range from the development of the railways to the poetry of Erasmus Darwin, from the construction of bridges and aqueducts to the aesthetic concepts of the Sublime and the Pictoresque, from the Luddite riots and the English ‘navvy’ to those artists most profoundly affected by the climate of the Industrial Revolution, among them John Martin, Joseph Wright of Derby, J.C. Bourne, and J.M.W. Turner.” (from back cover)

Publisher N. Carrington, London, 1947
Edited and revised by Arthur Elton
Revised and expanded edition by Adams & Dart, 1968
Publisher Paladin, St Albans, 1972
ISBN 0586081224, 9780586081228
xv+272 pages

Review: Fred H. Andrews (J Royal Society of Arts, 1949).

WorldCat

Art and the Industrial Revolution (English, 1947/1968, 60 MB, no OCR)
Arte e rivoluzione industriale (Italian, trans. Elena Einaudi, 1972)
Arte y revolución industrial (Spanish, trans. Pilar Salso, 1983)