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Welcome to Monoskop, a wiki for collaborative studies of the arts, media and humanities.

This page shows a selection of the latest additions to the website. For more detailed overview see the Recent, Contents, Index and Media library sections. Updates are also being posted on Twitter and Facebook.

Monoskop supports the open letter In solidarity with Library Genesis and Sci-Hub.

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Nathan Brown: The Limits of Fabrication: Materials Science, Materialist Poetics (2017)

“Poetry, or poiēsis, has long been understood as a practice of making. But how are experiments in the making of poetic forms related to formal making in science and engineering? The Limits of Fabrication takes up this question in the context of recent developments in nanoscale materials science, investigating concepts and ideologies of form at stake in new approaches to material construction. Tracing the direct pertinence of fields crucial to the new materials science (nanotechnology, biotechnology, crystallography, and geodesic design) in the work of Shanxing Wang, Caroline Bergvall, Christian Bök, and Ronald Johnson back to the midcentury development of Charles Olson’s ‘objectist’ poetics, Nathan Brown carves out a tradition of constructivist, nonorganic poetics that has developed in conversation with science and engineering.

While proposing a new approach to the relation of technē (craft, skill) and poiēsis (making, forming), this book also intervenes in philosophical debates concerning the concept of the object, the distinction between organic and inorganic matter, theories of self-organization, and the relation between ‘design’ and ‘nature’. Engaging with Heidegger, Agamben, Whitehead, Stiegler, and Nancy, Brown shows that materials science and materialist poetics offer crucial resources for thinking through the direction of contemporary materialist philosophy.”

Publisher Fordham University Press, New York, 2017
ISBN 9780823272990, 0823272990
xi+296 pages
via Memory of the World

Review: Tom Eyers (boundary2, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (26 MB)

A Bed, a Chair and a Table: Stories from the Poortgebouw (2017)

A Bed, a Chair and a Table is a publication about the Poortgebouw, a former squat and vibrant living community located in the South of Rotterdam. In this book, oral histories from inside and outside the Poortgebouw are interlaced with material from various institutional and personal archives. By bringing together these tales of resilience, political struggle, frustration and friendship with historical documents, this book brings forward new perspectives about the Poortgebouw’s unique history and its importance in the contemporary city. The starting point of the book was the Autonomous Archive, a local archiving machine built from parts of different computers by the inhabitants of the Poortgebouw and a group of students from XPUB.

A Bed, a Chair and a Table is the fourth ‘Special Issue’ conceptualised, developed and produced by the students from the Experimental Publishing course (XPUB) of the Piet Zwart Institute Media Design Master. It provides a trigger for the reader to further explore the Poortgebouw’s past and to see this building, meet its community, and discuss a potential future amidst all of its complexities. It is a testament to the archive as not the end, but the beginning of a debate.”

Publisher XPUB, Rotterdam, and Meta/Books, Amsterdam, December 2017
ISBN 9789082118247
Special Issue series, 4
Peer Production License
193 pages

Archive (wiki)
Publisher

PDF, PDF (122 MB)

Donna Haraway Reads The National Geographic on Primates (1987)

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“How does the ‘cultured’ gorilla, i.e. Koko, come to represent universal man? Author and cultural critic Donna Haraway untangles the web of meanings, tracing what gets to count as nature, for whom and when, and how much it costs to produce nature at a particular moment in history for a particular group of people. A feminist journey through the anthropological junglescape.”

Originally broadcasted on Paper Tiger Television in 1987.

The video was posted on the website of Paper Tiger TV in May 2017 under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND License.

MP4 (357 MB)

Constance DeJong: Modern Love (1975–)

<video controls id="video19526" width="320" height="235" poster="https://monoskop.org/media/film/DeJong_Constance_Modern_Love_Western_Front_Vancouver_1978.png"><source src="https://monoskop.org/media/film/DeJong_Constance_Modern_Love_Western_Front_Vancouver_1978.mp4" type="video/mp4" ></source></video>
Constance DeJong performs recitations from her novel Modern Love at Western Front, Vancouver, 20 Jan 1978. The segment up to 1m23s has no audio.

Constance DeJong‘s long-neglected, late-1970s novel, Modern Love, is one thing made up of many: It’s science-fiction. It’s a detective story. It is a historical episode in the time of the Armada and the dislocation of Sephardic Jews from Spain to an eventual location in New York’s lower east side. It is a first person narrator’s story; Charlotte’s story; and Roderigo’s; and Fifi Corday’s. It is a 150 year old story about Oregon and the story of a house in Oregon. Modern Love’s continuity is made of flow and motion, like an experience, it accumulates, as you read, at that moment, through successive moments, right to the end.”

DeJong initially published Modern Love in 1975–76. Serialized as five chapbooks, she designed, printed, and distributed it herself, then released a new edition with help from Dorothea Tanning on the short-lived Standard Editions imprint the following year.

DeJong also performed the book—not as a reading or play, but as a kind of mark of narrative in time. In 1976, she performed selections at The Kitchen’s first-ever literary event (a bill shared with Kathy Acker). Two years later, shortly after the book’s publication by Standard Editions, she produced a complete performance of the novel at The Kitchen, accompanied by prerecorded voices (including a cameo by David Warrilow of Mabou Mines) and music by Philip Glass.

The above video was posted on the website of Western Front in 2014.

A History of Modern Love as told by author, 2017
Interview by Emma Clayton, 2017
Resource assembled by Nick James Scavo, 2017

Reviews: Publishers Weekly (2017), Joe Milazzo (Full Stop, 2017), Gloria Beth Amodeo (Literary Rev, 2017).

Publisher (UDP, 2017 edition)
Publisher (PI, 2017 edition)

MP4 (154 MB)
PDF (book excerpt, 9 MB)

Glass Bead, 2: Site 1: Logic Gate, the Politics of the Artifactual Mind (2017) [English/French]

The first issue of the journal was dedicated to repositioning art in the landscape of reason. This issue is focused on the fabric of reason itself, and the ways in which it is currently altered by the emergence of artificial intelligence.

While the capacities of thought are being externalized in machines that increasingly mirror human intelligence, the question of the technical artifactuality of mind and its political ramifications becomes particularly pressing.

For us, far from being limited to the computational instantiation of intelligence, understanding the politics of these developments in artificial intelligence requires acknowledging that mind has always been artifactual.

Site 1: Logic Gate, the Politics of the Artifactual Mind proposes to explore the formal, philosophical and scientific dimensions of this question, so as to consider the role art might play in the lucid unfolding of its possibilities.”

With contributions by Danielle Macbeth, Gary Tomlinson, Matt Hare, Ben Woodard, Nina Power, Matteo Pasquinelli, Benjamin Bratton, Nora Khan, Hito Steyerl, Ian Cheng, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Reviel Netz, Peli Grietzer, Lee Gamble, Dhanveer Singh Brar, T’ai Smith, and James Trafford.

Edited by Fabien Giraud, Jeremy Lecomte, Vincent Normand, Ida Soulard, and Inigo Wilkins
Publisher Glass Bead, November 2017

HTML, PDFs (English)
HTML, PDFs (French)
See also Issue 1