Peter Gidal: Andy Warhol: Films and Paintings (1971)

28 October 2018, dusan

Peter Gidal’s early book “explores the relationship between the films and Warhol’s paintings. A major exponent of British structuralist/materialist film, the author emphasizes the connection between the serial nature of Warhol’s silkscreens and the fact that cinema consists of multiple frames. He also focuses on the temporal aspect of the films. According to Gidal, the anti-illusionism of Warhol’s cinema stems from his rejection of editing and montage in favor of continuous recording.”

Publisher Studio Vista, London, 1971
ISBN 0289700744, 9780289700747
160 pages

WorldCat

PDF (56 MB)

Andrew V. Uroskie: Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art (2014)

6 October 2018, dusan

“Today, the moving image is ubiquitous in global contemporary art. The first book to tell the story of the postwar expanded cinema that inspired this omnipresence, Between the Black Box and the White Cube travels back to the 1950s and 1960s, when the rise of television caused movie theaters to lose their monopoly over the moving image, leading cinema to be installed directly alongside other forms of modern art.

Explaining that the postwar expanded cinema was a response to both developments, Andrew V. Uroskie argues that, rather than a formal or technological innovation, the key change for artists involved a displacement of the moving image from the familiarity of the cinematic theater to original spaces and contexts. He shows how newly available, inexpensive film and video technology enabled artists such as Nam June Paik, Robert Whitman, Stan VanDerBeek, Robert Breer, and especially Andy Warhol to become filmmakers. Through their efforts to explore a fresh way of experiencing the moving image, these artists sought to reimagine the nature and possibilities of art in a post-cinematic age and helped to develop a novel space between the “black box” of the movie theater and the “white cube” of the art gallery. Packed with over one hundred illustrations, Between the Black Box and the White Cube is a compelling look at a seminal moment in the cultural life of the moving image and its emergence in contemporary art.”

Publisher University of Chicago Press, 2014
ISBN 9780226842981, 0226842983
x+273 pages

Reviews: Amanda Egbe (Leonardo, 2014), Rick Sieber (ARLIS/NA Reviews, 2014), Matilde Nardelli (Visual Studies, 2015), Kenneth White (CAA Reviews, 2015), Michael Zryd (Millennium Film Journal, 2015), Riccardo Venturi (Critique d’art, 2016, French).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

Apparatus, 6: Women at the Editing Table: Revising Soviet Film History of the 1920s and 1930s (2018)

5 October 2018, dusan

“The construction of the historical narrative of film editing has the cultural invisibility of women and of collaborators embedded within it. Film histories regularly spend whole chapters describing editing as a significant revolution in the medium. However, while the names of “great directors” are evoked in these discussions, the names of editors are not mentioned: “…for the most part, the women who cut film in the silent era remained unacknowledged in film credits or the trade press. Their work was considered to be merely technical rather than creative.” […]

Collectively, the articles in this issue are shifting understanding of the editor’s work from ‘merely’ technical or ‘just helping’, which is a gendered erasure of women’s work, to understanding it as expert collaboration in filmmaking. In other words, creative work. Why is this important? Because by obscuring the creativity of the work of the hands of women who watched, sorted, cut and pasted frames of film together we obscure the women themselves.” (from Editorial)

Texts by Karen Pearlman, John MacKay, and John Sutton, Lilya Kaganovsky, Natalie Ryabchikova, Nikolai Izvolov, Adelheid Heftberger, and Esfir Shub.

Edited by Karen Pearlman and Adelheid Heftberger
Publisher Apparatus, Berlin, August 2018
Open access
ISSN 2365-7758

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