Jack Smith: Wait For Me at the Bottom of The Pool: The Writings of Jack Smith (1997)

17 August 2017, dusan

“During thirty years of activity as a filmmaker, photographer and performer, Jack Smith produced a body of creative, antic writing that intersects and transcends the genres of hothouse fantasy, criticism and social comment. Bringing together long unavailable essays, performance scripts, interviews and other material, Wait for Me at the Bottom of the Pool reveals the ideas and personality of an artist whose distinctive vision has influenced generations of filmmakers and performance artists. With caustic wit, Smith praises the performances of Maria Montez as well as the sculpture of Walter de Maria, examines the cult success of Reefer Madness and the uses of pornography, and discusses the perils of democracy, the evils of property and the police state, art history and architecture.”

Edited by J. Hoberman and Edward Leffingwell
Publisher High Risk Books, with Institute of Contemporary Art/P.S. 1 Museum, New York, 1997
ISBN 1852424281, 9781852424282
177 pages

WorldCat

PDF (16 MB)

Ute Holl: Cinema, Trance and Cybernetics (2002/2017)

25 July 2017, dusan

“Ute Holl explores cinema as a cultural technique of trance, unconsciously transforming everyday spatio-temporal perception. The archaeology of experimental and anthropological cinema leads into psycho-physiological laboratories of the 19th century. Through personal and systematic catenations, avant-garde filmmaking is closely linked to the emerging aesthetics of feedback in cybernetic models of the mind developed at the same time. Holl analyses three major fields of experimental and anthropological filmmaking: the Soviet avant-garde with Dziga Vertov and his background in Russian psycho-reflexology and theory of trance; Jean Rouch and his theory of cine-trance and the feed-back; and the New American Cinema with Maya Deren and Gregory Bateson conceptualising the organisation of time, space, movement and feedback trance in anthropological filmmaking.”

First published as Kino, Trance und Kybernetik, Brinkmann & Bose, Berlin, 2002.

Translated by Daniel Hendrickson
Publisher Amsterdam University Press
Recursions series
Creative Commons BY-NC 4.0 License
ISBN 9789089646682, 908964668X
326 pages

Publisher
OAPEN
WorldCat

PDF, PDF

El medio es el diseño audiovisual (2007) [Spanish]

10 April 2017, dusan

“La Colección Editorial en Diseño Visual de la Facultad de Artes y Humanidades, es un proyecto propuesto por la Cátedra La Feria de la Universidad de Buenos Aires y producido por la IMAGOTECA, Centro de Documentación Visual, de la Universidad de Caldas. Su objeto es difundir el conocimiento en torno a las relaciones entre imágenes técnicas y lenguajes audiovisuales, el entrecruzamiento de la historia de los medios, los soportes y las tecnologías, y, por último, las prácticas de la creación y el diseño con medios audiovisuales. El propósito final es la difusión democrática del conocimiento en diseño y nuevos medios, en el contexto colombiano, donde la producción editorial en este campo es limitada.”

Autores: Roy Ascott, Hernando Barragán, Xavier Berenguer, Pierre Bongiovanni, Norbert Bolz, Rejane Cantoni, Walter Castañeda, Ricardo Cedeño, Michel Chion, Jean-Louis Comolli, Myriam Luisa Díaz, Philippe Dubois, Anne-Marie Duguet, Mauricio Duran Castro, Umberto Eco, Jean-Paul Fargier, Priscila Farías, Claudia Giannetti, Carmen Gil Vrolik, Jean-Luc Godard, Adriana Gómez Alzate, Olier Grau, Iliana Hernández García, Eduardo Kac, Jorge La Ferla, Pierre Lévy, Felipe Cesar Londoño López, Arlindo Machado, Lev Manovich, Christine Melo, Martha Patricia Niño, Nam June Paik, José Ramón Pérez Ornia, Omar Rincón, Nils Roller, Eduardo Russo, Carmelo Saitta, Lucia Santaella, María Teresa Santoro, Paula Sibilia, Bill Viola, Paul Virilio, Peter Weibel, Gerardo Yoel, Gene Youngblood, Siegfried Zielinski.

Edited by Jorge La Ferla
Publisher Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Colombia, and Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, 2007
ISBN 9789588319056, 9588319056
700 pages
via editor

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (12 MB)
Academia.edu

Karla Jasso, Daniel Garza Usabiaga (eds.): (Ready) Media: Hacia una arqueología de los medios y la invención en México (2012) [Spanish]

31 March 2017, dusan

A book published to accompany an exhibition on media archaeology in Mexico.

Publisher Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura, Mexico City, 2012
ISBN 9786076050132, 6076050136
519 pages
via Román Luján‏

Publisher (incl. information about the accompanying set of 6 DVDs)
WorldCat

PDF (143 MB)

Chris Marker: Silent Movie (1995)

17 March 2017, dusan

In Silent Movie, “Marker employs five-channels of video, each a thematic exploration of early cinema. Film images disclosing ‘The Journey,’ ‘The Face,’ ‘The Gesture,’ and ‘The Waltz’ occupy four of the monitors while on the fifth (and middle) monitor is a collection of ninety-four silent-era intertitles, ‘telling short, mysterious pieces of unknown stories.’ These moving images travel through a computer interface that assembles an ever-changing array of sequences. At any given moment, each passage is in unique juxtaposition with the other images passing across the surrounding monitors. Coloration, tone, and association are governed by chance contiguities; even the intertitles narrate across a field of fluid relationships.” (Source)

Silent Movie. To give an installation the name of something that never existed is probably less innocent than the average cat may infer. There was never anything like silent cinema, except at the very beginning, or in film libraries, or when the pianist had caught a bad flu. There was at least a pianist, and soon an orchestra, next the Wurlitzer, and what contraptions did they use, in the day of my childhood, to play regularly the same tunes to accompany the same film? I’m probably one of the last earthlings–the ‘last,’ says the cat–to remember what themes came with what films: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ on Wings (the dogfights), Liszt’s ‘The Preludes’ on Ben Hur. A touch of humour noir here, to think that the saga of the young hebrew prince was adorned by Hitler’s favorite music, which in turn explains why you hear it more often than Wagner on the German war newsreels–but I get carried away. …”–Chris Marker (book page 15)

Edited by Ann Bremner
Publisher Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio State University, Columbus/OH, 1995
ISBN 1881390101
40 pages
via MoMA

WorldCat

PDF
Video excerpt (8 min)

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