Nato Thompson (ed.): Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011 (2012)

18 March 2020, dusan

“Over the past twenty years, an abundance of art forms have emerged that use aesthetics to affect social dynamics. These works are often produced by collectives or come out of a community context; they emphasize participation, dialogue, and action, and appear in situations ranging from theater to activism to urban planning to visual art to health care. Engaged with the texture of living, these art works often blur the line between art and life. This book offers the first global portrait of a complex and exciting mode of cultural production—one that has virtually redefined contemporary art practice.

Living as Form grew out of a major exhibition at Creative Time in New York City. Like the exhibition, the book is a landmark survey of more than 100 projects selected by a thirty-person curatorial advisory team; each project is documented by a selection of color images. The artists include the Danish collective Superflex, who empower communities to challenge corporate interest; Turner Prize nominee Jeremy Deller, creator of socially and politically charged performance works; Women on Waves, who provide abortion services and information to women in regions where the procedure is illegal; and Santiágo Cirugeda, an architect who builds temporary structures to solve housing problems.

Living as Form contains commissioned essays from noted critics and theorists who look at this phenomenon from a global perspective and broaden the range of what constitutes this form.”

Contributing authors: Claire Bishop, Carol Becker, Teddy Cruz, Brian Holmes, Shannon Jackson, Maria Lind, Anne Pasternak, Nato Thompson.

Publisher Creative Time, New York, and MIT Press, 2012
ISBN 9780262017343, 0262017342
259 pages

Reviews: Tom Snow (review31, n.d.), Wendy Vogel (Brooklyn Rail, 2012), Jennie Klein (PAJ, 2015), Kim Yasuda (Public Art Dialogue, 2013), Régine Debatty (We Make Money Not Art, 2012), Mark Gardner (Urban Design Review, 2012), Michael DiRisio (Public Journal, 2014), Danielle Child (Reviews in Culture, 2012), Andreas Hudelist (Theater Forschung, 2014).
Exh. reviews: Jens Hoffmann (Frieze, 2012), Ben Davis (International Socialist Review, 2012), Rachel Daniell (emisferica, 2012).

Project website
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (19 MB)

Emergency Index: An Annual Document of Performance Practice, 2011-2017, 7 vols. (2012-2018)

14 December 2019, dusan

Emergency INDEX is an annual print publication documenting performances that occurred in one calendar year. Begun in 2011, INDEX was conceived as a “state of the field” publication that could present a year-to-year view of the issues, techniques, and challenges that performance makers dealt with in the work they actualized. Every year since then, INDEX has published hundreds of documents of performances made in various genres and media, for different audiences and purposes, and in a wide variety of venues, cities, and countries. Each annual volume includes three back-of-the-book indexes: an index of terms, an index of places, and an index of contributors. Taking as its starting point actual performances described by the artists who made them, INDEX proposes building your performance theory from the ground up.”

Edited by Yelena Gluzman, Matvei Yankelevich, a.o.
Publisher Ugly Duckling Presse, Brooklyn, NY, 2012-2018
ISBN 9781933254562 (vol. 1), 9781937027124 (vol. 2), 9781937027506 (vol. 3), 978-1-937027-55-1 (vol. 4), 9781937027759 (vol. 5), 9781937027988 (vol. 6), 9781937027988 (vol. 7)

Publisher (vol. 7)

HTML

Jeremy Matthew Glick: The Black Radical Tragic: Performance, Aesthetics, and the Unfinished Haitian Revolution (2016)

10 October 2019, dusan

“As the first successful revolution emanating from a slave rebellion, the Haitian Revolution remains an inspired site of investigation for a remarkable range of artists and activist-intellectuals in the African Diaspora.

In The Black Radical Tragic, Jeremy Matthew Glick examines twentieth-century performances engaging the revolution as laboratories for political thinking. Asking readers to consider the revolution less a fixed event than an ongoing and open-ended history resonating across the work of Atlantic world intellectuals, Glick argues that these writers use the Haitian Revolution as a watershed to chart their own radical political paths, animating, enriching, and framing their artistic and scholarly projects. Spanning the disciplines of literature, philosophy, and political thought, The Black Radical Tragic explores work from Lorraine Hansberry, Sergei Eisenstein, Edouard Glissant, Malcolm X, and others, ultimately enacting a speculative encounter between Bertolt Brecht and C.L.R. James to reconsider the relationship between tragedy and revolution. In its grand refusal to forget, The Black Radical Tragic demonstrates how the Haitian Revolution has influenced the ideas of freedom and self-determination that have propelled Black radical struggles throughout the modern era.”

Publisher New York University Press, New York, 2016
America and the Long 19th Century series
ISBN 9781479844425, 147984442X
xiii+266 pages

Reviews: Slavoj Žižek (LA Review of Books, 2016), Marina Sofia Magloire (Women & Performance, 2017), Paige A. McGinley (TDR, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF