Jack Smith: Wait For Me at the Bottom of The Pool: The Writings of Jack Smith (1997)

17 August 2017, dusan

“During thirty years of activity as a filmmaker, photographer and performer, Jack Smith produced a body of creative, antic writing that intersects and transcends the genres of hothouse fantasy, criticism and social comment. Bringing together long unavailable essays, performance scripts, interviews and other material, Wait for Me at the Bottom of the Pool reveals the ideas and personality of an artist whose distinctive vision has influenced generations of filmmakers and performance artists. With caustic wit, Smith praises the performances of Maria Montez as well as the sculpture of Walter de Maria, examines the cult success of Reefer Madness and the uses of pornography, and discusses the perils of democracy, the evils of property and the police state, art history and architecture.”

Edited by J. Hoberman and Edward Leffingwell
Publisher High Risk Books, with Institute of Contemporary Art/P.S. 1 Museum, New York, 1997
ISBN 1852424281, 9781852424282
177 pages

WorldCat

PDF (16 MB)

Richard Kostelanetz (ed.): Text–Sound Texts (1980)

28 July 2017, dusan

Anthology of scores, scripts, instructions, diagrams and documentation of art works that are meant to be heard. With more than one hundred pieces from a broad range of the 1960′s and 1970′s experimental artists from the music, art, literature, theater, and film worlds, including: John Cage, Guy de Coinet, Else von Freytag-Loringhoven, Allen Ginsberg, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Glenn Gould, Dick Higgins, Jack Kerouac, Annea Lockwood, Alvin Lucier, Jackson Mac Low, bp Nichol, Claes Oldenburg, Mary Ellen Solt, Gertrude Stein, Emmett Williams, and Robert Wilson, among others.

Publisher William Morrow, New York, 1980
ISBN 0688036163, 9780688036164
441 pages, 23.5 x 16 cm

WorldCat

PDF (100 MB)

Michael Kirby (ed.): Happenings: An Illustrated Anthology (1965)

28 July 2017, dusan

The book analyzes happenings as a new form of theatre comparable to collage and “compartmented” theater. Largely composed of statements, scripts, and illustrations of happenings by Allan Kaprow, Red Grooms, Robert Whitman, Jim Dine, and Claes Oldenburg.

Written and edited by Michael Kirby
Publisher E.P. Dutton, New York, 1965
287 pages

Review: Kirkus Rev (n.d.).

WorldCat

PDF (87 MB, no OCR)

Sally Banes: Greenwich Village 1963: Avant-Garde Performance and the Effervescent Body (1993)

28 July 2017, dusan

“The year was 1963 and from Birmingham to Washington, D.C., from Vietnam to the Kremlin to the Berlin Wall, the world was in the throes of political upheaval and historic change. But that same year, in New York’s Greenwich Village, another kind of history and a different sort of politics were being made. This was a political history that had nothing to do with states or governments or armies–and had everything to do with art. And this is the story that Sally Banes tells, a year in the life of American culture, a year that would change American life and culture forever. It was in 1963, as Banes’s book shows us, that the Sixties really began.

Banes draws a vibrant portrait of the artists and performers who gave the 1963 Village its exhilarating force, the avant-garde whose interweaving of public and private life, work and play, art and ordinary experience, began a wholesale reworking of the social and cultural fabric of America. Among these young artists were many who went on to become acknowledged masters in their fields, including Andy Warhol, John Cage, Yoko Ono, Yvonne Rainer, Lanford Wilson, Sam Shepard, Brian de Palma, Harvey Keitel, Kate Millet, and Claes Oldenburg. In live performance–Off-Off Broadway theater, Happenings, Fluxus, and dance–as well as in Pop Art and underground film, we see this generation of artists laying the groundwork for the explosion of the counterculture in the late 1960s and the emergence of postmodernism in the 1970s. Exploring themes of community, freedom, equality, the body, and the absolute, Banes shows us how the Sixties artists, though shaped by a culture of hope and optimism, helped to galvanize a culture of criticism and change. As 1963 came to define the Sixties, so this vivid account of the year will redefine a crucial generation in recent American history.”

Publisher Duke University Press, 1993
ISBN 082231357X, 9780822313571
ix+308 pages

Reviews: Serge Guilbaut (Am Hist Rev, 1995), Marla Carlson (Theatre J, 1996), PublishersWeekly (n.d.).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (100 MB, no OCR)

Benjamin Patterson: Born in the State of FLUX/us (2012)

28 July 2017, dusan

Benjamin Patterson: Born in the State of FLUX/us is a retrospective of the artist’s career, which now spans nearly fifty years. The exhibition includes both early and recent work by the artist that range from annotated scores and books to painting and sculpture. Video documentation from performances and audio files of Patterson’s music will also be featured. As a founding member of Fluxus, a loose and international collective of artists who infused avant-garde practices of the day with humor and anarchic energy, Patterson helped revolutionize the artistic landscape at the advent of the 1960s and usher in an era of new and experimental music.”

With essays by Bertrand Clavez, Charles Gaines, Jon Hendricks, George E. Lewis, Fred Moten, Benjamin Patterson, and Marcia Reed; and chronology by Meredith Goldsmith.

Edited by Valerie Cassel Oliver
Publisher Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, 2012.
ISBN 9781933619293, 1933619295
268 pages
via publisher

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (51 MB, no OCR)
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