Alexander Dorner: The Way Beyond ‘Art’ (1947/1958)

8 January 2017, dusan

A book by Alexander Dorner, a progressive museum director affiliated with interwar avant-garde, dealing with the tensions and genesis of modern art.

First edition published by Wittenborn & Schultz, New York, 1947

Revised edition
Introduction by John Dewey
Introduction to the revised edition by Charles L. Kuhn
Publisher New York University Press, New York, 1958
154 pages

Reviews: Vincent Tomas (J Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 1948), George Boas (Art Bulletin, 1947).
Commentary: Samuel Cauman (College Art J, 1948), Rebecca K. Uchill (2015).

WorldCat

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Nordic Journal of Aesthetics, 49-50: Art, Remembrance and History (2015)

1 January 2017, dusan

“This issue of The Nordic Journal of Aesthetics addresses the question of art’s ability to give form to the catastrophic events of the 20th century, primarily World War II and the atomic bomb, but on the way it – necessarily – broadens the scope of the enquiry to include the question of the relationship between art, remembrance and history today. The articles all contribute to the discussion of that complex relationship asking how art can call attention to past and present historical events of a catastrophic character with a view to changing the present (and the past). History – as Walter Benjamin has taught us – is always written from the present and ‘official history’ thus always has a very selective framing of the victims of history preferring to exclude and ‘invisibilize’ certain subjects and groups in order to naturalize the present order.”

Essays by Gene Ray, Sven Lütticken, Gavin Grindon, Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen, Ernst Van Alpen, Jacob Lund, Terry Smith, and Peter Osborne.

Edited by Mikkel Bolt and Jacob Lund
Publisher Thales, Stockholm, 2015
ISSN 2000-9607
188 pages

Publisher

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Domenico Quaranta: AFK: Texts on Artists, 2011-2016 (2016)

31 December 2016, dusan

“AFK – an acronym for “away of keyboard” – is an anthology of texts written for catalogues and exhibition brochures along the last five years, featuring twelve texts about eleven artists and an artist duo: Rosa Menkman, Jon Rafman, Gazira Babeli, Martin Kohout, Maurizio Cattelan, Enrico Boccioletti, Constant Dullaart, Jill Magid, Aram Bartholl, Emilie Brout & Maxime Marion, Evan Roth and Addie Wagenknecht. In different ways, these artists experienced the impact of digital means of production and dissemination, they experimented with them, they thought about them, and all this is reflected in their work. As Peter Sunde, the co-founder of the Pirate Bay, they think the internet is real, and they spend a lot of time in this real space of life, communication, love, hate, surveillance, sharing, and copying. Most of the works discussed here are made to be experienced in a brick and mortar space, away of keyboard; but reflect the current way of living, communicating, loving, hating, spying, sharing, copying, on and away of keyboard.”

Publisher Link Editions, Brescia, Dec 2016
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 Unported License
ISBN 9781326892920
180 pages

Publisher

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South as a State of Mind, 6-9 (2015-2017)

16 December 2016, dusan

South as a State of Mind is a magazine that was founded by Marina Fokidis in Athens in 2012. Beginning in 2015, the magazine temporarily becomes the documenta 14 journal, publishing four special issues (#6-#9) biannually until the opening of the exhibition in Athens and Kassel in 2017. These special issues are edited by Quinn Latimer, documenta 14’s editor-in-chief of publications, and documenta 14 artistic director Adam Szymczyk. The d14 South is conceived as a place of research, critique, art, and literature that parallels the years of work on the d14 exhibition overall, one that helps define and frame its concerns and aims. As such, the journal is a manifestation of documenta 14 rather than a discursive lens through which to merely presage the topics to be addressed in the eventual exhibition.”

Edited by Quinn Latimer and Adam Szymczyk
Publisher documenta & Museum Fridericianum, Kassel

Issue 6 (d14 1): Displacement and Dispossession (Oct 2015, HTML)
Issue 7 (d14 2): Silence as Resistance; Masks as Resistance (Apr 2016, HTML)
Issue 8 (d14 3): Language or Hunger (Oct 2016, HTML)

Chris Kraus: Lost Properties: Some Arguments For and Against the Dematerialization of Art (2014)

24 November 2016, dusan

“Everyone wants to be an artist. The number of undergraduate students completing fine arts degrees at US colleges doubled in the years between 1985–2010, according to the Digest of Education Statistics. But being an artist doesn’t necessarily mean making drawings or paintings or sculpture or even installations or videos. The desire to pursue a life in ‘fine art’ simply means a desire to respond creatively to the present, just as the disciplines of ‘poetry’ or ‘rock & roll’ were ciphers for countercultural lifestyles in other eras. The only real difference lies in credentialing. As the definition of what constitutes ‘fine art’ expands to include journalism, social work, landscape architecture, theater, poetry, school-teaching, and literary nonfiction under the banners of ‘social practice,’ ‘research,’ and ‘art writing,’ institutions respond by offering specialized, low-residency degrees in these areas taught by itinerant, poorly-paid faculty. Participants travel between cities within and beyond Europe to dialogue about ‘communities’ during brief residencies.”

Publisher Semiotext(e), Los Angeles, 2014
Number 19 in a series of 22 publications produced on the occasion of the 2014 Whitney Biennial
ISBN 9781584351573
31 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

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