Lynn Hershman Leeson (ed.): Clicking In: Hot Links to a Digital Culture (1996)

15 March 2017, dusan

“All things digital dominate the discourse of the nineties and inspire opinion that ranges from the outrage of the neo-Luddite to the heady optimism of the digiphile. In this collection, the most provocative voices of the Digital Age grapple with the direction of digital technology and its concomitant issues, including virtual identities and their relationship to the physical self, the collision of commercial and community interests on the Net, the Net threat to intellectual property, and the merger of art, popular culture, and commerce in interactive media.” (book jacket)

Texts and interviews by Sadie Plant, Jaron Lanier, R.U. Sirius, Sherry Turkle, Lev Manovich, Rudolf Frieling, Simon Biggs, Siegfried Zielinski, a.o.

Publisher Bay Press, Seattle, 1996
ISBN 0941920429, 9780941920421
x+371 pages

Review: Steve Jones (Signs, 1999).

WorldCat

PDF (81 MB)

Daniel Buren: Five Texts (1973)

7 March 2017, dusan

Artist Daniel Buren’s writings on minimal and conceptual art.

Contents:
Preface : Why write texts, or, The place from where I act –
I. Beware –
II. It rains, it snows, it paints –
III. Standpoints –
IV. Critical limits –
V. Function of the museum.

Publisher John Weber Gallery, New York, and Jack Wendler Gallery, London, 1973
64 pages
via x

WorldCat

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Proud to be Flesh: A Mute Magazine Anthology of Cultural Politics after the Net (2009)

4 March 2017, dusan

“In late 1994, back in the days of dial-up modems and Netscape Navigator 1.0, Mute magazine announced its timely arrival. Dedicated to an analysis of culture and politics ‘after the net’, Mute has consistently challenged the grandiose claims of the communications revolution, debunking its utopian rhetoric and offering more critical perspectives.

Fifteen years on, this anthology selects representative articles from the magazine’s hugely diverse content to reprise some of its recurring themes. This expansive collection charts the perilous journey from Web 1.0 to 2.0, contesting the democratisation this transition implied and laying bare our incorporeal expectations; it exposes the ways in which the logic of technology intersects with that of art and music and, in turn and inevitably, with the logic of business; it heralds the rise of neoliberalism and condemns the human cost; it amplifies the murmurs of dissent and revels in the first signs of collapse. The result situates key – but often little understood – concepts associated with the digital (e.g. the knowledge commons, immaterial labour and open source) in their proper context, producing an impressive overview of contemporary, networked culture in its broadest sense.

Proud to be Flesh features a mix of essays, interviews, satirical fiction, email polemics and reportage from an array of international contributors working in art, philosophy, technology, politics, cultural theory, radical geography and more.”

Edited by Josephine Berry Slater and Pauline van Mourik Broekman, with Michael Corris, Anthony Iles, Benedict Seymour and Simon Worthington
Publisher Mute Publishing, London, with Autonomedia, New York, 2009
ISBN 9781906496289, 1906496285
572+48 pages

Reviews: Nicholas Thoburn (New Formations), Charlotte Frost (Rhizome), Julian Stallabrass (New Left Review).

Magazine
Publisher
WorldCat

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Alexander Dorner: The Way Beyond ‘Art’ (1947/1958)

8 January 2017, dusan

A book by Alexander Dorner, a progressive museum director affiliated with interwar avant-garde, dealing with the tensions and genesis of modern art.

First edition published by Wittenborn & Schultz, New York, 1947

Revised edition
Introduction by John Dewey
Introduction to the revised edition by Charles L. Kuhn
Publisher New York University Press, New York, 1958
154 pages

Reviews: Vincent Tomas (J Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 1948), George Boas (Art Bulletin, 1947).
Commentary: Samuel Cauman (College Art J, 1948), Rebecca K. Uchill (2015).

WorldCat

PDF (19 MB)

Nordic Journal of Aesthetics, 49-50: Art, Remembrance and History (2015)

1 January 2017, dusan

“This issue of The Nordic Journal of Aesthetics addresses the question of art’s ability to give form to the catastrophic events of the 20th century, primarily World War II and the atomic bomb, but on the way it – necessarily – broadens the scope of the enquiry to include the question of the relationship between art, remembrance and history today. The articles all contribute to the discussion of that complex relationship asking how art can call attention to past and present historical events of a catastrophic character with a view to changing the present (and the past). History – as Walter Benjamin has taught us – is always written from the present and ‘official history’ thus always has a very selective framing of the victims of history preferring to exclude and ‘invisibilize’ certain subjects and groups in order to naturalize the present order.”

Essays by Gene Ray, Sven Lütticken, Gavin Grindon, Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen, Ernst Van Alpen, Jacob Lund, Terry Smith, and Peter Osborne.

Edited by Mikkel Bolt and Jacob Lund
Publisher Thales, Stockholm, 2015
ISSN 2000-9607
188 pages

Publisher

PDF (4 MB)
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