Chris Kraus: Lost Properties: Some Arguments For and Against the Dematerialization of Art (2014)

24 November 2016, dusan

“Everyone wants to be an artist. The number of undergraduate students completing fine arts degrees at US colleges doubled in the years between 1985–2010, according to the Digest of Education Statistics. But being an artist doesn’t necessarily mean making drawings or paintings or sculpture or even installations or videos. The desire to pursue a life in ‘fine art’ simply means a desire to respond creatively to the present, just as the disciplines of ‘poetry’ or ‘rock & roll’ were ciphers for countercultural lifestyles in other eras. The only real difference lies in credentialing. As the definition of what constitutes ‘fine art’ expands to include journalism, social work, landscape architecture, theater, poetry, school-teaching, and literary nonfiction under the banners of ‘social practice,’ ‘research,’ and ‘art writing,’ institutions respond by offering specialized, low-residency degrees in these areas taught by itinerant, poorly-paid faculty. Participants travel between cities within and beyond Europe to dialogue about ‘communities’ during brief residencies.”

Publisher Semiotext(e), Los Angeles, 2014
Number 19 in a series of 22 publications produced on the occasion of the 2014 Whitney Biennial
ISBN 9781584351573
31 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (no OCR, 4 MB)

Marcel Duchamp (1973)

27 September 2016, dusan

Catalogue for a retrospective exhibition co-curated by Anne d’Harnoncourt of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Kynaston McShine of The Museum of Modern Art. In addition to these venues, the show traveled to The Art Institute of Chicago. This exhibition, the third retrospective dedicated to Marcel Duchamp and the first organized following the artist’s death, was also an inaugural exhibition of the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s newly formed 20th Century Art Department. The museum has a substantial collection of Duchamp works, the majority of which came to it through the 1950 gift of the Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection.

The book contains a documented photographic survey of Duchamp’s works (over 90 pp), passages from Duchamp’s lectures, comments and tributes from 50 contemporaries, documentary illustrations, a chronology (over 20 pp), a bibliography (10 pp), and ten original essays by scholars and critics: Michel Sanouillet, Richard Hamilton, Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., Arturo Schwarz, David Antin, Lucy R. Lippard, Kynaston McShine, Robert Lebel, Octavio Paz, and John Tancock. The essays cover Duchamp’s explorations in the areas of language, poetry, the machine, alchemy, and the epistemology of art; on a more personal level, they treat the milieux and the friend ships that shaped his character, the life style to which he adhered, the influence his example has exerted.

Edited by Anne d’Harnoncourt and Kynaston McShine
Publisher Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, 1973
ISBN 0870702963, 9780870702969
345 pages
via MoMA

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (86 MB)

Too Much World: The Films of Hito Steyerl (2014)

25 September 2016, dusan

“Hito Steyerl is considered one of the most exciting artists working today who speculates on the impact of the Internet and digitization on the fabric of our everyday lives. Her films and writings offer an astute, provocative, and often funny analysis of the dizzying speed with which images and data are reconfigured, altered, and dispersed, many times over, accelerating into infinity or crashing into oblivion.

Published to accompany the artist’s survey exhibitions at the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, and the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, Too Much World gathers a series of essays and close readings of Steyerl’s films from 2004-2014. Newly commissioned texts by Sven Lütticken, Karen Archey, Ana Teixeira Pinto, and Nick Aikens, alongside writings by Thomas Elsaesser, Pablo Lafuente, David Riff, and Steyerl, are spliced with over one hundred pages of color stills.”

Edited by Nick Aikens
Publisher Sternberg Press, Berlin; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; and Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2014
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License
ISBN 9783956790577
247 pages

Exh. reviews: Amelia Groom (2014), Paula Albuquerque (Necsus 2015), Dylan Rainforth (LEAP 2015), Kate Woodcroft (Artlink 2015), Scott Redford (Ran Dian 2015).

Exhibition (Van Abbemuseum)
Exhibition (IMA)
Publisher (Sternberg)
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (single pages, 4 MB)
PDF, PDF (spreads, 4 MB)

Joseph Beuys: Mapping The Legacy (2001)

26 August 2016, dusan

“A group of critics, art historians and artists gathered at the Ringling Museum to take part in an international symposium on the legacy of Joseph Beuys. The papers presented here examine the artist’s various productive modes by means of different critical tools and criteria. The result is a reader that will help both students and art professionals come to terms with this controversial and influential artist.”

Essays by Lukas Beckmann, Benjamin H.D. Buchloch, Mel Chin, Pamela Kort, Kim Levin, Peter Nisbet, Gene Ray, Max Reithmann, and Joan Rothfuss.

Edited by Gene Ray
Publisher D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, New York, and Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, FL, 2001
ISBN 1891024035
viii+214+17 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (25 MB)

Louise Bourgeois: Destruction of the Father / Reconstruction of the Father: Writings and Interviews, 1923–1997 (1998)

16 July 2016, dusan

“‘Everyday you have to abandon your past or accept it and then if you cannot accept it, you become a sculptor.’

Since the age of twelve, the internationally renowned sculptor Louise Bourgeois has been writing and drawing; first a diary precisely recounting the everyday events of her family life, then notes and reflections. Destruction of the Father — the title comes from the name of a sculpture she did following the death of her husband in 1973 — contains both formal texts and what the artist calls ‘pen-thoughts’: drawing-texts often connected to her drawings and sculptures, with stories or poems inscribed alongside the images. Writing is a means of expression that has gained increasing importance for Bourgeois, particularly during periods of insomnia. The writing is compulsive, but it can also be perfectly controlled, informed by her intellectual background, knowledge of art history, and sense of literary form (she has frequently published articles on artists, exhibitions, and art events). Bourgeois, a private woman ‘without secrets’, has given numerous interviews to journalists, artists, and writers, expressing her views on her oeuvre, revealing its hidden meanings, and relating the connection of certain works to the traumas of her childhood. This book collects both her writings and her spoken remarks on art, confirming the deep links between her work and her biography and offering new insights into her creative process.”

Edited and with texts by Marie-Laure Bernadac and Hans-Ulrich Obrist
Publisher MIT Press, with Violette Editions, London, 1998
ISBN 0262522462, 9780262522465
384 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (102 MB)

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