A Bed, a Chair and a Table: Stories from the Poortgebouw (2017)

12 December 2017, dusan

A Bed, a Chair and a Table is a publication about the Poortgebouw, a former squat and vibrant living community located in the South of Rotterdam. In this book, oral histories from inside and outside the Poortgebouw are interlaced with material from various institutional and personal archives. By bringing together these tales of resilience, political struggle, frustration and friendship with historical documents, this book brings forward new perspectives about the Poortgebouw’s unique history and its importance in the contemporary city. The starting point of the book was the Autonomous Archive, a local archiving machine built from parts of different computers by the inhabitants of the Poortgebouw and a group of students from XPUB.

A Bed, a Chair and a Table is the fourth ‘Special Issue’ conceptualised, developed and produced by the students from the Experimental Publishing course (XPUB) of the Piet Zwart Institute Media Design Master. It provides a trigger for the reader to further explore the Poortgebouw’s past and to see this building, meet its community, and discuss a potential future amidst all of its complexities. It is a testament to the archive as not the end, but the beginning of a debate.”

Publisher XPUB, Rotterdam, and Meta/Books, Amsterdam, December 2017
ISBN 9789082118247
Special Issue series, 4
Peer Production License
193 pages

Book website & Book launch

PDF, PDF (122 MB)

Amodern, 7: Ephemera and Ephemerality (2017)

5 December 2017, dusan

“Like some winged insects, ephemera – the plural of the Greek ephemeron – denotes things that last through the day. Maurice Rickards defined it as “the minor transient documents of everyday life” – bus tickets, business cards, bookmarks. Ephemera describes modern mass media forms such as the newspaper and radio broadcasts, as well as contemporary ones such as email and short message service. Ephemera haunts classical aesthetics, whose pretensions to cultural value and endurance can figuratively efface its own materiality and fragility. Ephemera similarly menaces concepts and practices of history, even when it serves as evidence of the past and the stuff of the archive. Indeed, ephemera problematizes memory itself: Wendy Hui Kyong Chun has theorized that digital media create an “enduring ephemeral” of constantly refreshing, regenerating information, introducing as much instability into computer programs as abides in putatively more fallible, degenerative human memory. With this observation, the paradox of ephemera – that it was meant to be disposable and fleeting, but is instead often kept and collected – comes into view as a central ambivalence of modern mediated life.”

With essays by Christina Svendsen, Mollie McFee, Priti Joshi, Kimberly Hall, Dennis Yi Tenen, Susan Zieger, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, and a conversation with Mita Mahato.

Edited by Priti Joshi and Susan Zieger
Publisher Concordia University and Lakehead University, December 2017
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

HTML

Beyond the Dust: Artists’ Documents Today (2011)

14 October 2017, dusan

Catalogue with artists’ contributions on the occasion of the group exhibition Beyond the Dust – Artists’ Documents Today, curated by Francesca di Nardo in collaboration with Lorenzo Benedetti. Featured artists reflect upon contemporary ways of understanding memory and notions of authenticity, fiction and forgery. Questions also re-examine the historical notion of archive resources being inextricably linked to historical truth.

With contributions by Linda Fregni Nagler, Mark Geffriaud, Invernomuto, Jeroen Kooijmans, Irene Kopelman, Benoît Maire, Diego Marcon, Clément Rodzielski, Roma Publications, Batia Suter, Richard Sympson, and Raphaël Zarka.

Edited by Roger Willems in collaboration with Gwenneth Boelens.
Publisher Roma Publications, Amsterdam, 2011
ISBN 9789077459560
209 pages
via publisher

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (19 MB)
Issuu