Russian Dada 1914-1924 (2018) [EN, ES]

20 August 2019, dusan

“This exhibition explores Russian avant-garde art through the perspective of the Anti-art canons associated with the international Dada movement.

The selected works reveal the intentions of many artists to take part in projects of public unrest with connotations in close proximity to Marxism and to adopt rejection, irony, the absurd and chance as the basic principles underpinning their artistic manifestations.”

With essays by Margarita Tupitsyn, Victor Tupitsyn, Olga Burenina-Petrova, and Natasha Kurchanova.

Edited by Margarita Tupitsyn
Publisher Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, and MIT Press, 2018
ISBN 9788480265737, 8480265736
342 pages

Exhibition
Publisher
WorldCat

English: PDF, PDF (30 MB)
Spanish: PDF, PDF (30 MB)

Alternative Film/Video 2016/17: Discussions: Art Movements / Subversion (2018) [Serbian/English]

9 May 2019, dusan

This book contains transcripts from two roundtable discussions held during the 2016 and 2017 editions of Alternative Film/Video festival in Belgrade. The themes included the relation of alternative cinema art movements (2016) and subversion (2017).

Participants include Hito Steyerl, Marina Gržinić, Eve Heller, Želimir Žilnik, Peter Tscherkassky, Božidar Zečević, Miloš Miša Radivojević, Zoran Saveski, Lordan Zafranović, Slobodan Šijan, Dejan Sretenović, Greg deCuir, Jr., Bojan Jovanović, Petra Belc, Sebestyén Kodolányi, Miroslav Bata Petrović, Miroljub Stojanović, Bruce Checefsky, Miroslav Bata Petrović, Tomaso Aramini, Zoran Saveski, and Miodrag Milošević.

Publisher Students’ City Cultural Center, Belgrade, 2018
157 pages
via Academic Film Center

PDF (19 MB)

Andrew V. Uroskie: Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art (2014)

6 October 2018, dusan

“Today, the moving image is ubiquitous in global contemporary art. The first book to tell the story of the postwar expanded cinema that inspired this omnipresence, Between the Black Box and the White Cube travels back to the 1950s and 1960s, when the rise of television caused movie theaters to lose their monopoly over the moving image, leading cinema to be installed directly alongside other forms of modern art.

Explaining that the postwar expanded cinema was a response to both developments, Andrew V. Uroskie argues that, rather than a formal or technological innovation, the key change for artists involved a displacement of the moving image from the familiarity of the cinematic theater to original spaces and contexts. He shows how newly available, inexpensive film and video technology enabled artists such as Nam June Paik, Robert Whitman, Stan VanDerBeek, Robert Breer, and especially Andy Warhol to become filmmakers. Through their efforts to explore a fresh way of experiencing the moving image, these artists sought to reimagine the nature and possibilities of art in a post-cinematic age and helped to develop a novel space between the “black box” of the movie theater and the “white cube” of the art gallery. Packed with over one hundred illustrations, Between the Black Box and the White Cube is a compelling look at a seminal moment in the cultural life of the moving image and its emergence in contemporary art.”

Publisher University of Chicago Press, 2014
ISBN 9780226842981, 0226842983
x+273 pages

Reviews: Amanda Egbe (Leonardo, 2014), Rick Sieber (ARLIS/NA Reviews, 2014), Matilde Nardelli (Visual Studies, 2015), Kenneth White (CAA Reviews, 2015), Michael Zryd (Millennium Film Journal, 2015), Riccardo Venturi (Critique d’art, 2016, French).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF