Matthew Plummer-Fernandez: The Art of Bots: A Practice-based Study of the Multiplicity, Entanglements and Figuration of Sociocomputational Assemblages (2018)

11 July 2019, dusan

“This thesis examines and analyses an emerging art practice known as artbots. Artbots are internet-based software applications that are imbued with character and configured to engage and entertain online audiences. This form of practice, and the community of practice leading it, was found to be underrepresented and misunderstood. I argue that this artform is original and warrants a more thorough understanding. This thesis develops a conceptual framework for understanding artbots that focuses on and enables questioning around pertinent aspects of the practice.

A wide range of literature was reviewed to provide theoretical underpinnings towards this framework, including literature on algorithm studies, science and technology studies, and software architecture. The devised framework examines artbot case studies through the notions of multiplicity, entanglement, and figuration, having understood artbots as heterogenous sociocomputational assemblages comprised of software components and human intraactivity.

The research followed a varied methodology that encompassed participant observation and my own practice-based experiments in producing artbots. The study resulted in several original works. In addition, a showcase titled Art of Bots brought together key proponents and artbots, further providing material that is analysed in this thesis. The study helped identify and discuss artbots with attention to how they utilise modular software components in novel arrangements, how normative human and nonhuman relations of interaction are being eschewed in favour of entangled interrelations, and how artbots challenge common narratives dictating technological constructs by inventing unique characters and figurations.”

Doctoral thesis
Publisher Goldsmiths, University of London, 2018
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND License
218 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF (10 MB)
ZIP (Supplemental material, 20 GB)

Contemporary And (C&): Platform for International Art from African Perspectives, 1-9 (2014-2018)

6 June 2019, dusan

Contemporary And (C&) is an online art magazine and a dynamic space for the reflection on and linking together of ideas, discourse and information on contemporary art practice from diverse African perspectives.”

Edited by Julia Grosse, Yvette Mutumba, Will Furtado, a.o.
Publisher Contemporary And (C&) & Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (ifa), Stuttgart
Open Access

Publisher

HTML (online platform)
PDFs (print issues):
Issue 1: Dak’Art 14 (Dakar Biennale Special) (Apr 2014)
Issue 2: Kampala Focus (Sep 2014)
Issue 3: Focus Migration (Jun 2015)
Issue 4: Focus Bamako (10th Bamako Encounters – African Biennale of Photography Special) (English/French, Sep 2015)
Issue 5: The Interview Issue (Feb 2016)
Issue 6: Afro-Brazilian Perspectives (32nd Bienal de São Paulo Special) (Sep 2016)
Issue 7: Curriculum of Connections (documenta 14 Special) (Jun 2017)
Special Edition: #Nairobi (Sep 2017)
Issue 8: Conditions (Art Scene Cameroon Special) (Dec 2017)
Issue 9: You Are Already in it: Looking at a Global Diaspora (10th Berlin Biennale Special) (Jun 2018)

TkH, 23: The Commons / Undercommons in Art, Education, Work … (2016)

5 June 2019, dusan

“The fifteen pieces in this issue are the result of a somewhat peculiar endeavor. Between May 29 and June 1, 2014, we held a conference at Frankfurt Lab under the title of The Public Commons and the Undercommons of Art, Education, and Labour. Its title reflected our concerns about diagnosing the current predicament of higher education in the arts and humanities, artistic production, and cultural work. To summarize briefly, two turns have lately merged that characterize the transformation of work, knowledge, and subjectivation processes across the arts field and the Academy: the educational and the curatorial turn. While the educational turn has yielded a new academic (professional) valorization of artistic praxis (in the so-called creative or practice-based PhDs), coupled with a proliferation of degrees and a prolongation of financialized, debt-stricken study (also as a temporary deferral or relief from the market and its projective temporality), the curatorial turn has corresponded to a neoliberal style of managing both art and education, reducing time and attention, critical and transformative (poetic) engagements with one’s own art and study.” (from the Introduction)

With contributions by Harutyun Alpetyan, Gigi Argiropoulou, Stefano Harney, Gal Kirn, Boyan Manchev, Randy Martin, Fred Moten, Isabel de Naverán, Norbert Pape, Nina Power, Goran Sergej Pristaš, Jason Read, Jan Ritsema, Ana Vujanović, and Josefine Wikström.

Edited by Bojana Cvejić, Bojana Kunst, and Stefan Hölscher
Publisher TkH (Walking Theory), Belgrade, and Institute for Applied Theatre Science, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, April 2016
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0 Serbia License
ISSN 1451-0707
72 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF