Interdisciplinary Science Reviews 42(1-2): The Experimental Generation (2017)

3 September 2017, dusan

“This special double issue of ISR came out of the conference The experimental generation: networks of interdisciplinary praxis in post war British art (1950–1970) we organized together in 2014, exploring an apparent convergence of interest in art and science around the notion of social responsibility in the 1960s. …

It is rarely recognized that Cambridge was something of a hotbed of interdisciplinary exploration in the 1960s. Within this issue we seek to bring some of the leading figures behind this into the foreground, from the Language Research Unit led by Margaret Masterman to the Centre for Land Use and Built Form Studies created by Leslie Martin in the Architecture Department. Cambridge was, after all, where C.P. Snow (re)ignited the ‘Two Cultures’ debate in 1959; where two key figures in cybernetics and systems theory, Gordon Pask and Robin McKinnon-Wood, met as undergraduates, founded their company ‘System Research’ and developed their first early computers. Ian Sommerville, the precocious mathematician who invented the ‘Dreamachine’ with Bryon Gysin was an undergraduate at Trinity College when he invited Gustav Metzger to give his first public lecture/demonstration on Auto-Destructive Art for the Heretics Society in 1960. In 1964, St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, played host to the ‘First International Exhibition of Concrete, Kinetic and Phonic Poetry’ initiated by a young academic in the English department, Michael Weaver who gathered together over 60 works by poets and artists from 14 countries for a week’s exhibition in a Cambridge college. He worked closely with Reg Gadney, Philip Steadman and Stephen Bann who co-edited a formative issue of IMAGE magazine, on Kinetic Art: Concrete Poetry in November 1964. Steadman, Weaver and Bann went on to launch Form (1966–1969).

As a founder member of the Cambridge University Artists Group, Gadney was instrumental in spreading knowledge of Kinetic Art methods and techniques through articles in the student magazine Granta as well as the London Magazine. In 1965 Metzger was invited back to Cambridge to deliver his ‘Chemical Revolution in Art’ lecture attended by Bann, Gadney and Steadman. In his article for this journal Professor Stephen Bann looks back at the art and ideas that informed his book Experimental Painting, published in 1970, which took developments in art of the previous decade as its subject.

This issue spotlights a period that is still within living memory, and still reverberates today. In encouraging such a diversity of articles we have followed our instincts as curators rather than historians. We have gathered together a constellation of voices, from pioneers to emerging scholars, in order to encourage and facilitate unanticipated connections.” (from the Introduction)

Edited by Bronać Ferran and Elizabeth Fisher
Publisher Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining, London, 2017
ISSN 0308-0188
224 pages

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Ephemera 17(2): The Social Productivity of Anonymity (2017)

9 July 2017, dusan

“In a process that started decades ago, a multiplicity of forces is creating a slow, but steadily rising storm against anonymity. Discourses of transparency and accountability often describe anonymity as a threat. Technologies such as the IP-address-based Internet, sensory devices, and machine learning techniques further undermine anonymous encounters. In an age of near ubiquitous surveillance, anonymity is under attack. But what is at stake in such discourses and developments? Based on the premise that anonymity is always socially productive and always socially produced, this special issue draws attention to anonymity as a social form that demands renewed attention. The contributions explore its temporalities, its transformative powers, and its entanglements with public spheres, property relations, and practices of person making.”

Publisher Ephemera collective, with MayFlyBooks, May 2017
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License
ISBN 9781906948375
220 pages

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Amodern, 6: Reading the Illegible (2016)

12 April 2017, dusan

Amodern is a peer-reviewed, open-access scholarly journal devoted to the study of media, culture, and poetics.

The collective aim of contributions to this issue is “to imagine, in a scholarly or para-scholarly fashion, what we could explore, as writers and artists, if we took seriously the potential poetics of illegibility as a weird sub-category of the legible.”

With contributions by Nick Thurston, Johanna Drucker, Michael Cronin, John Mowitt, Garrett Stewart, Diana Hamilton, Kate Briggs, Matt Applegate, Stephen Voyce, and Luke Skrebowski.

Edited by Nick Thurston
Publisher Concordia University and Lakehead University, July 2016
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

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Crisis and Critique 3(3): Critique of Political Economy (2016)

3 February 2017, dusan

Rereading Marx.

Contributions by Dennis Badeen & Patrick Murray, Riccardo Bellofiore, Jacques Bidet, Ivan Boldyrev, Michael Heinrich, Campbell Jones, Kojin Karatani, Ognian Kassabov, Andrew Kliman, Elena Louisa Lange, Frédéric Lordon, David Pavón Cuéllar, Jason Read, Frank Smecker, Massimiliano Tomba, Raquel Varela and Valério Arcary, Fabio Vighi, Gavin Walker, Yuan Yao, Slavoj Žižek, and an interview with Moishe Postone.

Edited by Frank Ruda & Agon Hamza
Published 16 Nov 2016
ISSN 2311-5475
521 pages

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previous issues

Reductive, 1-4 (2014-15)

2 February 2017, dusan

“Experimental reflections on listening / reading practices.

Founded in 2013, Reductive Journal explores diverse approaches to text-sound compositions, examining how text and sound are related, defined and inter-permeated in various levels of experiences: listening, reading, perceiving, receiving and performing.

Each Journal is a collaboration between the editors, designers and contributing artists.”

Editors: Ryoko Akama, Heather Frasch and Daniel del Rio
Publisher Mumei, 2014-15
ISBN 97809934337

Publisher (archived)

Issue 1 (July 2014, 1 MB)
Issue 2 (January 2015, 4 MB)
Issue 3 (June 2015, 23 MB)
Issue 4 (November 2015, 38 MB)

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