Richard W. Bailey (ed.): Computer Poems (1973)

14 October 2019, dusan

A collection of early computer-generated poetry gathered by Richard W. Bailey.

“At the beginning of this century, Stephane Mallarmé published a slogan for modernism: A throw of the dice will never abolish chance. Chance is not abolished by the computer’s randomizing power but is re-created in different terms. The poet-programmer finds this power a tool to create a new set of dice, multi-faceted and marked with elements of his own choosing.

Yet the new battle to free language is fought on familiar battlefields: concrete poetry is reflected with a computer mirror in the poems of Leslie Mezei and Greta Monarch; pure poetry of sound in the verbal orchestrations of Archie Donald and Noreen Greeno; imagistic poetry in the juxtaposition of the unfamiliar by Charles Forbes, James Runner, and Robin Shirley; syllabic organization in the haiku of Margaret Chisman, Robert Gaskins, and John Morris; and the imposition of order on disorder in the poems of Marie Borroff, Pete Kilgannon, and Louis Milic. From all of these varied efforts a new convention has already arisen that allows poets like Edwin Morgan the scope to simulate computer poetry without recourse to the machine.

The Potagannissing Press takes pleasure in the publication of the following collection of poems, an edition of computer-assisted literary works executed in Britain, Canada, and the United States.

The occasion for its publication was a symposium on the computer in the arts held at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in May 1973, an event sponsored by the Academy, the Bloomfield Art Association, Eastern Michigan University, and the University of Michigan, with the support of the Michigan Council for the Arts.” (from the preface)

Publisher Potagannissing Press, Drummond Island, MI, 1973
53 pages
via xfoml

Commentary: Matteo D’Ambrosio (Matlit, 2018).

WorldCat

PDF (7 MB, page warble is due to the book copy’s poor condition)
Internet Archive

Gary Westfahl: William Gibson (2013)

14 February 2019, dusan

“The leading figure in the development of cyberpunk, William Gibson (born in 1948) crafted works in which isolated humans explored near-future worlds of ubiquitous and intrusive computer technology and cybernetics. This volume is the first comprehensive examination of the author of the seminal novel Neuromancer (and the other books in the Sprawl trilogy, Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive), as well as other acclaimed novels including Pattern Recognition, Spook Country, and Zero History. Gary Westfahl draws upon extensive research to provide a compelling account of Gibson’s writing career and his lasting influence in the science fiction world.

Delving into numerous science fiction fanzines that the young Gibson contributed to and edited, Westfahl delivers new information about Gibson’s childhood and adolescence. He describes for the first time more than eighty virtually unknown Gibson publications from his early years, including articles, reviews, poems, cartoons, letters, and a collaborative story. The book also documents the poems, articles, and introductions that Gibson has written for various books, and its discussions are enriched by illuminating comments from various print and online interviews. The works that made Gibson famous are also featured, as Westfahl performs extended analyses of Gibson’s ten novels and nineteen short stories. Lastly, the book presents a new interview with Gibson in which the author discusses his correspondence with author Fritz Leiber, his relationship with the late scholar Susan Wood, his attitudes toward critics, his overall impact on the field of science fiction, and his recently completed screenplay and forthcoming novel.”

Publisher University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL 2013
Modern Masters of Science Fiction series
ISBN 9780252037801, 0252037804
xi+210 pages
via jl

Reviews: Benjamin Gabriel (Strange Horizons, 2013), D. Harlan Wilson (Extrapolation, 2013), Michael M. Levy (Science Fiction Studies, 2014), Lars Schmeink (Journal for the Fantastic in the Arts, 2014).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (43 MB)

Jonathan Benthall: Science and Technology in Art Today (1972)

27 January 2019, dusan

An early treatise on art, science and technology based on the series of articles written for Studio International.

Publisher Praeger, New York, 1972
180 pages

Review: John H. Holloway (Leonardo, 1975).

WorldCat

PDF (46 MB)
See also Jonathan Bentham’s Technological Art and Studio International‘s Eclectic Vanguardism, 2017.