Charlotte Johannesson. Take Me to Another World (2021) [EN, ES]

7 December 2021, dusan

“A key figure of Swedish counterculture and the creator of the first digital arts laboratory in Nordic countries, Charlotte Johannesson has worked primarily with two tools: the artisan technology of the loom and digital IT programming technology, exploring and throwing into relief the connections, both conceptual and methodological, that exist between the two.

Charlotte Johannesson. Take Me to Another World renders an account of the meticulous research process around colour and line that the artist executes in her textile and digital practice. It also spotlights the contribution of Danish writer and artist Amalie Smith, who set up a dialogue between Johannesson’s career and her own present-tense narrative. Furthermore, the publication incorporates an interview conducted with the artist in 2012, re-edited and translated for this occasion.”

Publisher Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, 2021
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISBN 9788480266246, 8480266244
172 pages

Exhibition
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (English)
PDF, PDF (Spanish)

The Magazine of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, 5: Cybernetic Serendipity (1968)

26 October 2018, dusan

An issue of ICA London’s magazine dedicated to the seminal exhibition exploring relationships between arts and cybernetics, Cybernetic Serendipity. Contains texts by Martin Gardner on Op art, Pierre Barbaud on information theory and music, Charles Csuri on his computer art, and an essay on Andrew Rawlinson’s concrete poetry.

Edited by Jasia Reichardt
Publisher Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, Aug 1968
38 pages
via johnsta

PDF (41 MB)

Emigre, 11: Graphic Designers and the Macintosh Computer (1989)

28 December 2017, dusan

Emigre magazine’s eleventh issue, ‘Ambition/Fear: Graphic Designers and the Macintosh Computer’, contains vivid artifacts of a discipline’s first encounter with digital tools. From the aesthetics of bitmaps to the expressive interventions made possible by new access to typesetting controls, not to mention the self-publishing venture of the magazine itself, this issue combines modernist and postmodern agendas in a model construction of text-based community.”

Release of the digitized issue “coincides with the publication of “Inflection Point” a rigorously researched essay about Emigre #11 by writer/designer Emily McVarish. The essay takes a close look at Emigre #11, analyzing the technical, critical, and cultural production that would shape Emigre as a medium for typographic demonstration and discussion among peers.”

Design and production: Rudy VanderLans
Typeface designs: Zuzana Licko
Publisher Emigre Graphics, Berkeley, CA, 1989
32 pages, 11.25 x 16.75 in
via Letterform Archive

Commentary: Emily McVarnish (2017, 59 pp).

Publisher

PDF (23 MB)
JPG