The Magazine of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, 5: Cybernetic Serendipity (1968)

26 October 2018, dusan

An issue of ICA London’s magazine dedicated to the seminal exhibition exploring relationships between arts and cybernetics, Cybernetic Serendipity. Contains texts by Martin Gardner on Op art, Pierre Barbaud on information theory and music, Charles Csuri on his computer art, and an essay on Andrew Rawlinson’s concrete poetry.

Edited by Jasia Reichardt
Publisher Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, Aug 1968
38 pages
via johnsta

PDF (41 MB)

Emigre, 11: Graphic Designers and the Macintosh Computer (1989)

28 December 2017, dusan

Emigre magazine’s eleventh issue, ‘Ambition/Fear: Graphic Designers and the Macintosh Computer’, contains vivid artifacts of a discipline’s first encounter with digital tools. From the aesthetics of bitmaps to the expressive interventions made possible by new access to typesetting controls, not to mention the self-publishing venture of the magazine itself, this issue combines modernist and postmodern agendas in a model construction of text-based community.”

Release of the digitized issue “coincides with the publication of “Inflection Point” a rigorously researched essay about Emigre #11 by writer/designer Emily McVarish. The essay takes a close look at Emigre #11, analyzing the technical, critical, and cultural production that would shape Emigre as a medium for typographic demonstration and discussion among peers.”

Design and production: Rudy VanderLans
Typeface designs: Zuzana Licko
Publisher Emigre Graphics, Berkeley, CA, 1989
32 pages, 11.25 x 16.75 in
via Letterform Archive

Commentary: Emily McVarnish (2017, 59 pp).

Publisher

PDF (23 MB)
JPG

InterCommunication ’91: The Museum Inside the Telephone Network (1991) [Japanese/English]

13 November 2017, dusan

The exhibition organised by the Project InterCommunication Center (ICC), founded by the Japanese telecom NTT, was a pioneering project investigating the implications of networked communication for the museum institution. The exhibition was only accessible to home users by means of the telephone, fax, and in a limited sense computer networking. It was meant as a model for a new kind of an “invisible” museum. Later it was followed up by another ICC exhibition The Museum Inside the Network (1995). The ICC opened its exhibition space in 1997.

The works and messages from almost 100 artists, writers, and cultural figures were available through five channels. The works in “Voice & sound channel” such as talks and readings on the theme of communication could be listened to by telephone. The “Interactive channel” offered participants to create musical tunes by pushing buttons on a telephone. Works of art, novels, comics and essays could be received at home through “Fax channel”. The “Live channel” offered artists’ live performances and telephone dialogues between invited intellectuals to be heard by telephone. Additionally, computer graphics works could be accessed by modem and downloaded to one’s personal computer screen for viewing.

Contributors include Laurie Anderson, J.G. Ballard, Christian Boltanski, Pierre Boulez, William S. Burroughs, Merce Cunningham, Daniel Buren, John Cage, Jacques Derrida, Allen Ginsberg, Philip Glass, Félix Guattari, Pontus Hultén, Derek Jarman, Jeff Koons, Daniel Libeskind, Jackson Mac Low, Judith Malina, Renzo Piano, Steve Reich, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Akira Sakata, Paul Virilio, Robert Wilson, Tadanori Yokoo, John Zorn, a.o.

Edited by Urban Design Research
Introduction by Akira Asada, Yutaka Hikosaka, and Toshiharu Itou
Publisher NTT, Tokyo, 1991
259 pages

Exhibition
WorldCat

PDF (76 MB)
PDF (hi-res, 235 MB)