Jasper Bernes: The Work of Art in the Age of Deindustrialization (2017)

24 April 2018, dusan

“A novel account of the relationship between postindustrial capitalism and postmodern culture, this book looks at American poetry and art of the last fifty years in light of the massive changes in people’s working lives. Over the last few decades, we have seen the shift from an economy based on the production of goods to one based on the provision of services, the entry of large numbers of women into the workforce, and the emergence of new digital technologies that have transformed the way people work. The Work of Art in the Age of Deindustrialization argues that art and literature not only reflected the transformation of the workplace but anticipated and may have contributed to it as well, providing some of the terms through which resistance to labor was expressed. As firms continue to tout creativity and to reorganize in response to this resistance, they increasingly rely on models of labor that derive from values and ideas found in the experimental poetry and conceptual art of decades past.”

Publisher Stanford University Press, 2017
Post ’45 series
ISBN 9780804796415, 0804796416
viii+231 pages

Reviews: Stevphen Shukaitis (Marx & Philosophy Review of Books, 2017), Julian Murphet (Affirmations, 2017), Vince Carducci (Public Seminar, 2017).

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML

Local Contexts / International Networks: Avant-Garde Journals in East-Central Europe (2018)

10 April 2018, dusan

“This volume presents papers based on the presentations held at the conference Local Contexts / International Networks – Avant-Garde Magazines in Central-Europe (1910-1935) held at the Kassák Museum in September 2015. The Museum is the only Hungarian museum devoted entirely to the avant-garde and its documents. It launched a programme centred around the presentation of archives and private collections, contemporary reflections on the avant-garde, and a reconsideration of Kassák’s oeuvre.

The avant-garde journal was arguably the most important medium of communication for progressive literature and visual arts in the region during World War I and the interwar period. The conference brought together researchers of different disciplines and approaches to analyse the multifaceted nature of the avant-garde journal. It aimed to draw attention to the tensions between national/local and international/cosmopolitan and offer possible answers to the question: how did the different cultural and historical characteristics affect the local avant-gardes of Central Europe?” (from Introduction)

With texts by Gábor Dobó and Merse Pál Szeredi, Eszter Balázs, Jindřich Toman, Gábor Dobó, Piotr Rypson, Michalina Kmiecik, Przemysław Strożek, Klára Prešnajderová, Sonia de Puineuf, Michał Wenderski, Dušan Barok, György C. Kálmán and András Kappanyos, and Irina Denischenko.

Edited by Gábor Dobó and Merse Pál Szeredi
Publisher Petőfi Literary Museum & Kassák Museum, Kassák Foundation, Budapest, 2018
The Avant-Garde and Its Journals series, 2
Creative Commons Licence Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Generic License
ISBN 9789631259728
192 pages

Conference
Publisher

PDF, PDF (13 MB)

Boris Groys (ed.): Russian Cosmism (2018)

19 March 2018, dusan

“Cosmism emerged in Russia before the October Revolution and developed through the 1920s and 1930s; like Marxism and the European avant-garde, two other movements that shared this intellectual moment, Russian Cosmism rejected the contemplative for the transformative, aiming to create not merely new art or philosophy but a new world. Cosmism went the furthest in its visions of transformation, calling for the end of death, the resuscitation of the dead, and free movement in cosmic space. This volume collects crucial texts, many available in English for the first time, by the radical biopolitical utopianists of Russian Cosmism.

Cosmism was developed by the Russian philosopher Nikolai Fedorov in the late nineteenth century; he believed that humans had an ethical obligation not only to care for the sick but to cure death using science and technology; outer space was the territory of both immortal life and infinite resources. After the revolution, a new generation pursued Fedorov’s vision. Cosmist ideas inspired visual artists, poets, filmmakers, theater directors, novelists (Tolstoy and Dostoevsky read Fedorov’s writings), architects, and composers, and influenced Soviet politics and technology. In the 1930s, Stalin quashed Cosmism, jailing or executing many members of the movement. Today, when the philosophical imagination has again become entangled with scientific and technological imagination, the works of the Russian Cosmists seem newly relevant.”

With texts by Alexander Bogdanov, Alexander Chizhevsky, Nikolai Fedorov, Boris Groys, Valerian Muravyev, Alexander Svyatogor, Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, Anton Vidokle, and Brian Kuan Wood.

Publisher e-flux, New York, and MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2018
ISBN 9780262037433, 0262037432
ix+249 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

HTML