MoneyLab Reader 2: Overcoming the Hype (2018)

8 February 2018, dusan

“MoneyLab is a network of artists, activists, and geeks experimenting with forms of financial democratization. Entering the 10th year of the global financial crisis, it still remains a difficult yet crucial task to distinguish old wine from its fancy new bottles. The MoneyLab network questions persistent beliefs, from Calvinist austerity, growth, and up-scaling, to trustless, automated decision making and (anarcho-)capitalist dreams of cybercurrencies and blockchained solutionism.

We consider experiments with digital coops, internet-based payment and network-based revenue models as spaces of political imagination, with an equally important aesthetic program. In this second MoneyLab Reader the network delves into topics like the financialization of art; love as a binary proposition on the blockchain; the crowdfunding of livelihood; the cashless society; financial surveillance of the poor; universal basic income as the real McCoy or a real sham; the cooperative answer to Airbnb and Uber; the history of your financial dashboard; and, Hollywood’s narration of the financial crisis. Fintech rushes through our veins, causing a whirlwind of critical concepts, ideas and imaginaries. Welcome to the eye of the storm.”

Contributors: Jaya Klara Brekke, Tripta Chandola, Max Dovey, Economic Space Agency, General Intellect, Max Haiven, Robert Herian, David Hollanders, Dmytri Kleiner, Silvio Lorusso, Laura Lotti, Nathalie Maréchal, Rachel O’Dwyer, Nina Power, Patricia Reed, Patrice Riemens, Emily Rosamond, Trebor Scholz, Brett Scott, Nathaniel Tkacz, Pablo R. Velasco, Martin Zeilinger.

Edited by Inte Gloerich, Geert Lovink, and Patricia de Vries
Publisher Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam, 2018
INC Reader series, 11
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 License
ISBN 9789492302199, 9492302195
280 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (8 MB)
EPUB
Issuu

A Field Guide to “Fake News” and Other Information Disorders (2018)

8 January 2018, dusan

“This guide explores the use of digital methods to study false viral news, political memes, trolling practices and their social life online.

It responds to an increasing demand for understanding the interplay between digital platforms, misleading information, propaganda and viral content practices, and their influence on politics and public life in democratic societies.”

Compiled by Liliana Bounegru, Jonathan Gray, Tommaso Venturini, and Michele Mauri
Publisher Public Data Lab, January 2018
Creative Commons BY 4.0 License
211 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF (89 MB)
GitHub

Interventions in Digital Cultures: Technology, the Political, Methods (2017)

20 November 2017, dusan

“How to intervene? Interventions are in vogue in digital cultures as forms of critique or political actions into public spheres. By engaging in social, political, and economic contexts, interventions attempt to interrupt and change situations—often with artistic means. This volume maps methods of interventions under the specific conditions of the digital. How are interventions shaped by these conditions? And how can they contribute to altering them? In essays and interviews, this book interrogates modes of intervening in and through art, infrastructures, techno-ecological environments, bio-technology, and political protests to highlight their potentials as well as their ambivalences.”

With contributions by Martina Leeker, Fred Turner, Howard Caygill, Alexander R. Galloway, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Ulrike Bergermann, Steve Kurtz, Kat Jungnickel, and Tobias Schulze.

Edited by Howard Caygill, Martina Leeker, and Tobias Schulze
Publisher meson press, Lüneburg, 2017
Digital Cultures series
Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 License
ISBN 9783957961105, 3957961106
148 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (3 MB)