Kenneth Goldsmith: Duchamp Is My Lawyer: The Polemics, Pragmatics, and Poetics of UbuWeb (2020)

22 June 2020, dusan

“In 1996, during the relatively early days of the web, Kenneth Goldsmith created UbuWeb to post hard-to-find works of concrete poetry. What started out as a site to share works from a relatively obscure literary movement grew into an essential archive of twentieth- and twenty-first-century avant-garde and experimental literature, film, and music. Visitors around the world now have access to both obscure and canonical works, from artists such as Kara Walker, Yoko Ono, Pauline Oliveros, Samuel Beckett, Marcel Duchamp, Cecil Taylor, Glenn Ligon, William Burroughs, and Jean-Luc Godard.

In Duchamp Is My Lawyer, Goldsmith tells the history of UbuWeb, explaining the motivations behind its creation and how artistic works are archived, consumed, and distributed online. Based on his own experiences and interviews with a variety of experts, Goldsmith describes how the site navigates issues of copyright and the ways that UbuWeb challenges familiar configurations and histories of the avant-garde. The book also portrays the growth of other “shadow libraries” and includes a section on the artists whose works reflect the aims, aesthetics, and ethos of UbuWeb. Goldsmith concludes by contrasting UbuWeb’s commitment to the free-culture movement and giving access to a wide range of artistic works with today’s gatekeepers of algorithmic culture, such as Netflix, Amazon, and Spotify.”

Publisher Columbia University Press, New York, 2020
ISBN 9780231186940, 0231186940
x+318 pages

Reviews: Mark Athitakis (On the Seawall, 2020), Nick Soulsby (PopMatters, 2020), Tomáš Hudák (3/4, 2020, SK).

Publisher
WorldCat

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Janis Jefferies, Sarah Kember (eds.): Whose Book is it Anyway? A View From Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity (2019)

8 May 2019, dusan

Whose Book is it Anyway? is a provocative collection of essays that opens out the copyright debate to questions of open access, ethics, and creativity. It includes views – such as artist’s perspectives, writer’s perspectives, feminist, and international perspectives – that are too often marginalized or elided altogether.

The diverse range of contributors take various approaches, from the scholarly and the essayistic to the graphic, to explore the future of publishing based on their experiences as publishers, artists, writers and academics. Considering issues such as intellectual property, copyright and comics, digital publishing and remixing, and what it means (not) to say one is an author, these vibrant essays urge us to view central aspects of writing and publishing in a new light.”

With contributions by John Cayley and Daniel C. Howe, Louise O’Hare, Janneke Adema, Michael Bhaskar, Alison Baverstock, Sophie Rochester, Smita Kheria, Ronan Deazley and Jason Mathis, Danuta Kean, J. R. Carpenter, Eva Weinmayr, Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Joseph F. Turcotte, Simon Groth, Janis Jefferies, Laurence Kaye, Richard Mollet, Rachel Calder, and Max Whitby.

Publisher OpenBook Publishers, Cambridge, UK, 2019
Creative Commons BY 4.0 International License
ISBN 9781783746491, 1783746491
xiv+442 pages

Publisher
OAPEN
WorldCat

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Memory of the World (ed.): Guerrilla Open Access (2018)

29 June 2018, dusan

“In the 1990s, the Internet offered a horizon from which to imagine what society could become, promising autonomy and self-organization next to redistribution of wealth and collectivized means of production. While the former was in line with the dominant ideology of freedom, the latter ran contrary to the expanding enclosures in capitalist globalization. This antagonism has led to epochal copyrights, where free software and piracy kept the promise of radical commoning alive.

As the contributions to this pamphlet indicate, the terms of struggle have shifted: not only do we have to continue defending our shadow libraries, but we need to take back the autonomy of knowledge production and rebuild institutional grounds of solidarity.”

With texts by Memory of the World, Christopher Kelty, Balázs Bodó, and Laurie Allen.

Publisher Post Office Press, Rope Press, and Memory of the World, Coventry, 2018
Radical Open Access II series
Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 License
34 pages

HumanitiesCommons

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