Douglas R. Dechow, Daniele C. Struppa (eds.): Intertwingled: The Work and Influence of Ted Nelson (2015)

29 September 2018, dusan

“This volume celebrates the life and work of Theodor Holm “Ted” Nelson, a pioneer and legendary figure from the history of early computing. Presenting contributions from renowned computer scientists and figures from the media industry, the book delves into hypertext, the docuverse, Xanadu, and other products of Ted Nelson’s unique mind.”

With contributions by Ed Subitzky, Ben Shneiderman, Alan Kay, Ken Knowlton, Brewster Kahle, Peter Schmideg and Laurie Spiegel, Andrew Pam, Dick Heiser, Belinda Barnet, Christine L. Borgman, Wendy Hall, Frode Hegland, Daniel Rosenberg, Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Robert M. Akscyn, Henry Lowood, and Theodor Holm Nelson.

Publisher SpringerOpen, Cham, 2015
Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License
ISBN 9783319169248, 3319169246
xvi+150 pages

Conference (2014)
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF, PDFs
EPUB, EPUB

Frederick G. Kilgour: The Evolution of the Book (1998)

25 October 2014, dusan

A concise book by the professor in library and information science who, in the late 1960s, helped to establish the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), a worldwide consortium of library databases.

Writing from the perspective of history of technology, Kilgour investigates the book’s three discrete forms–the clay tablet, papyrus roll, and codex–before turning to the electronic book.

Publisher Oxford University Press, New York, 1998
ISBN 0195118596, 9780195118599
180 pages

Review (Robert J. Brugger, Technology and Culture, 2001)
Review (Bruce Whiteman, Huntington Library Quarterly, 1998)

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (12 MB)

James Nyce, Paul Kahn (eds.): From Memex to Hypertext: Vannevar Bush and the Mind’s Machine (1991)

15 July 2014, dusan

Vannevar Bush, the engineer who designed the world’s most powerful analog computer, envisioned the development of a new kind of computing machine he called Memex. For many computer and information scientists, Bush’s Memex has been the prototype for a machine to help people think.

This volume, which the editors have divided into sections on the creation, extension, and legacy of the Memex, combines seven essays by Bush with eleven others by others that set his ideas within a variety of contexts. The essays by Bush range chronologically from the early “The Inscrutable Thirties” (1933), “Memorandum Regarding Memex” (1941), and “As We May Think” (1945), to “Memex II” (1959), “Science Pauses” (1967), “Memex Revisited” (1967), and a passage from “Of Inventions and Inventors” (1970). Bush’s essays are surrounded by four chapters that place his changing plans for the Memex within his career and within information technology before digital computing.”

Contributors include Larry Owens, Colin Burke, Douglas C. Engelbart, Theodor H. Nelson, Linda C. Smith, Norman Meyrowitz, Tim Oren, Gregory Crane, and Randall H. Trigg.

Publisher Academic Press, San Diego and London, 1991
ISBN 0125232705, 9780125232708
367 pages
via Marcell Mars, in the Unlimited Edition

Memex animation (1995)

Review (George P. Landow, The Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 1992)
Review (Matthew Wall, College & Research Libraries, 1992)
Review (Liam Murray, ReCALL, 1993)

EPUB