State Machines: Reflections and Actions at the Edge of Digital Citizenship, Finance, and Art (2019)

20 March 2019, dusan

“Today, we live in a world where every time we turn on our smartphones, we are inextricably tied by data, laws and flowing bytes to different countries. A world in which personal expressions are framed and mediated by digital platforms, and where new kinds of currencies, financial exchange and even labor bypass corporations and governments. Simultaneously, the same technologies increase governmental powers of surveillance, allow corporations to extract ever more complex working arrangements and do little to slow the construction of actual walls along actual borders. On the one hand, the agency of individuals and groups is starting to approach that of nation states; on the other, our mobility and hard-won rights are under threat. What tools do we need to understand this world, and how can art assist in envisioning and enacting other possible futures?”

Contributors: James Bridle, Max Dovey, Marc Garrett, Valeria Graziano, Max Haiven, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Francis Hunger, Helen Kaplinsky, Marcell Mars, Tomislav Medak, Rob Myers, Emily van der Nagel, Rachel O’Dwyer, Lídia Pereira, Rebecca L. Stein, Cassie Thornton, Paul Vanouse, Patricia de Vries, Krystian Woznicki.

Edited by Yiannis Colakides, Marc Garrett, and Inte Gloerich
Publisher Institute of Network Cultures, Amsterdam, 2019
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 License
ISBN 9789492302335
260 pages

Publisher

PDF (59 MB)
EPUB (39 MB)

Jonathan Benthall: Science and Technology in Art Today (1972)

27 January 2019, dusan

An early treatise on art, science and technology based on the series of articles written for Studio International.

Publisher Praeger, New York, 1972
180 pages

Review: John H. Holloway (Leonardo, 1975).

WorldCat

PDF (46 MB)
See also Jonathan Bentham’s Technological Art and Studio International‘s Eclectic Vanguardism, 2017.

Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030: One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (2016)

22 December 2018, dusan

“The Stanford One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, a project that launched in December 2014, is designed to be a century-long periodic assessment of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its influences on people, their communities, and society. Colloquially referred to as “AI100″, the project issued its first report in September 2016. A Standing Committee works with the Stanford Faculty Director of AI100 in overseeing the project and designing its activities. A little more than two years after the first report appeared, we reflect on the decisions made in shaping it, the process that produced it, its major conclusions, and reactions subsequent to its release.

The inaugural AI100 report, which is titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030,” examines eight domains of human activity in which AI technologies are already starting to affect urban life. In scope, it encompasses domains with emerging products enabled by AI methods and ones raising concerns about technological impact generated by potential AI – enabled systems. The Study Panel members who authored the report and the AI100 Standing Committee, which is the body that directs the AI100 project, intend for it to act as a catalyst, spurring conversations on how we as a society might shape and share the potentially powerful technologies that AI could enable. In addition to influencing researchers and guiding decisions in industry and governments, the report aims to provide the general public with a scientifically and technologically accurate portrayal of the current state of AI and its potential. It aspires to replace conceptions rooted in science fiction books and movies with a realistic foundation for these deliberations.”

Publisher Stanford University, September 2016
Creative Commons BY-ND 4.0 International License
52 pages

Commentary: Barbara J. Grosz & Peter Stone (Communications of the ACM, 2018).

Authors

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