Precarity Lab: Technoprecarious (2020)

5 January 2021, dusan

“An analysis that traces the role of digital technology in multiplying precarity.

Technoprecarious advances a new analytic for tracing how precarity unfolds across disparate geographical sites and cultural practices in the digital age. Digital technologies—whether apps like Uber, built on flexible labor, or platforms like Airbnb that shift accountability to users—have assisted in consolidating the wealth and influence of a small number of players. These platforms have also exacerbated increasingly insecure conditions of work and life for racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities; women; indigenous people; migrants; and peoples in the global south. At the same time, precarity has become increasingly generalized, expanding to include even the creative class and digital producers themselves.

This collaboratively authored multigraph analyzes the role of digital technology in multiplying precarity. The authors use the term precarity to characterize those populations disproportionately affected by the forms of inequality and insecurity that digital technologies have generated despite the new affordances and possibilities they offer. The book maps a broad range of digital precarity—from the placement of Palestinian Internet cables to the manufacture of electronics by Navajo women and from the production and deployment of drones on the U.S.–Mexico border to the technocultural productions of Chinese makers. This project contributes to, and helps bridge, ongoing debates on precarity and digital networks in the fields of critical computing, postcolonial studies, visual culture, and information sciences.”

Publisher Goldsmiths Press, London, November 2020
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License
ISBN 9781912685981, 1912685981
xi+113 pages

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Volume, 49: In Loving Support (2016)

3 December 2020, dusan

“This publication shows the outcome of a four-day retreat organised by Het Nieuwe Instituut and Volume in June 2016. During this meeting, designers, artists and scientists researched the meaning of artificial intelligence on the practice of cultural research.”

Contributors: Marina Otero Verzier, Klaas Kuitenbrouwer, Luis Rodil-Fernández, Matthew Plummer-Fernandez, Ben Schouten, Nick Axel, Katía Truijen, Lilet Breddels, Merel Noorman, Tamar Shafrir, Füsun Türetken, Femke Snelting, Simone C. Niquille, Dorien Zandbergen.

An insert in Volume #49: Hello World!
Edited by Nick Axel
Publisher Archis Foundation, and Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam, September 2016
ISSN 1574-9401
32 pages

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SFRA Review, 50(2-3): Alternative Sinofuturisms (2020)

26 November 2020, dusan

“The idea for this special issue developed out of a workshop organized by Dino Ge Zhang as part of the WuDaoKou Futurists collective, a collective aimed at decentering Sinofuturism from its Western articulations. The workshop, “Alternative Sinofuturisms,” already presupposes Sinofuturism as a venue for alterity and retains a space for various approaches and understandings of who and what is being foregrounded. Centralized in Beijing but held online with invited speakers from four different continents, the workshop was organized around a series of provocations, most of which are included in this issue.”

Contributors: Loïc Aloisio and Gwennaël Gaffric, Virginia L. Conn, Gabriele de Seta, Margaret A. Fisher, Carmen Herold, Amy Ireland, Lyu Guangzhao, Astrid Møller-Olsen, Yen Ooi, Frederike Schneider-Vielsäcker, Molly Silk, Mitchell van Vuren, Dino Ge Zhang.

Edited by Virginia L. Conn
Publisher Science Fiction Research Association, Spring-Summer 2020
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISSN 2641-2837
pages 66-181

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