Lisa Lowe: The Intimacies of Four Continents (2015)

21 March 2021, dusan

“In this uniquely interdisciplinary work, Lisa Lowe examines the relationships between Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth- centuries, exploring the links between colonialism, slavery, imperial trades and Western liberalism. Reading across archives, canons, and continents, Lowe connects the liberal narrative of freedom overcoming slavery to the expansion of Anglo-American empire, observing that abstract promises of freedom often obscure their embeddedness within colonial conditions. Race and social difference, Lowe contends, are enduring remainders of colonial processes through which “the human” is universalized and “freed” by liberal forms, while the peoples who create the conditions of possibility for that freedom are assimilated or forgotten. Analyzing the archive of liberalism alongside the colonial state archives from which it has been separated, Lowe offers new methods for interpreting the past, examining events well documented in archives, and those matters absent, whether actively suppressed or merely deemed insignificant. Lowe invents a mode of reading intimately, which defies accepted national boundaries and disrupts given chronologies, complicating our conceptions of history, politics, economics, and culture, and ultimately, knowledge itself.”

Publisher Duke University Press, Durham, NC, June 2015
ISBN 9780822358633, 0822358638
319 pages

Discussion: Gayatri Gopinath, Alyosha Goldstein, Moon-Ho Jung, Stephanie Smallwood (book roundtable at ASA Conference, Toronto, 2015, video).
Reviews: John Holmwood (Theory, Culture & Society, 2016), Betty Joseph (American Historical Review, 2016), Hossein Ayazi (Qui Parle, 2016), Michael Gaffney (Journal of American Studies, 2016), Adam Nemmers (Women’s Studies, 2016), Marion C. Rohrleitner (Pacific Historical Review, 2016), Lance Bertelsen (Modern Philology, 2017), Harrod J Suarez (Melus: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., 2017), Jesse van Amelsvoort (Nexus Instituut, n.d.), Hadley Howes (Antipode, 2020).

Publisher
WorldCat

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Archives of the Commons II: The Anomic Archive (2021) [English, Spanish]

18 March 2021, dusan

“In the past few years, we have seen emerging alternative and autonomous experiences of archive management and production that move away from the legitimized principles and regulations to explore the possibilities of the common. If what is common implies to leave the logic of property, if it implies to work against the privatization of knowledge and to abandon the consideration of what is public as exclusive patrimony of the State, the challenge is to find collaborative ways of production, distribution and circulation of knowledge. The experiences tackled in this book multiply the ways of conceiving and facilitating access to different types of documentary collections, so as to favor the plural becoming of history and its different writing and re-writing, elaborating and re-elaborating, in a continuous movement, that what we can call common.”

With contributions by Nancy Dantas (Center for Curating the Archive), Graciela Carnevale (Archivo Graciela Carnevale), Lani Hanna (Interference Archive(, May Puchet (RedCSur), Philippe Artières, Daniel G. Andújar, Alessandro Ludovico, Red Conceptualismos del Sur, Paulina Bravo (Archiveras sin fronteras), Kristóf Nagy (Artpool Research Center), Eva Weinmar (Piracy Proyect), Maite Muñoz Iglesias, LACA YAXS, Ernesto Oroza (Desobediencia tecnológica), Gareth Bell-Jones (The Flat Time House), Francisco Brives, Néstor Prieto, María Gil, Patricia Rodriguez, and Elsa Velasco (Museo La Neomudéjar).

Edited by Fernanda Carvajal, Mela Dávila Freire, Mabel Tapia
Publisher Red Conceptualismos del Sur (RedCSur)/Pasafronteras, Buenos Aires, 2021
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA International License 4.0
ISBN 9782956997115
145 pages

Seminar (2017)
Publisher

PDF, PDF (English, 34 MB)
PDF, PDF (Spanish, 34 MB)

Cornelia Sollfrank, Felix Stalder, Shusha Niederberger (eds.): Aesthetics of the Commons (2021)

6 February 2021, dusan

“What do a feminist server, an art space located in a public park in North London, a ‘pirate’ library of high cultural value yet dubious legal status, and an art school that emphasizes collectivity have in common? They all demonstrate that art can play an important role in imagining and producing a real quite different from what is currently hegemonic; that art has the possibility to not only envision or proclaim ideas in theory, but also to realize them materially.

Aesthetics of the Commons examines a series of artistic and cultural projects—drawn from what can loosely be called the (post)digital—that take up this challenge in different ways. What unites them, however, is that they all have a ‘double character.’ They are art in the sense that they place themselves in relation to (Western) cultural and art systems, developing discursive and aesthetic positions, but, at the same time, they are ‘operational’ in that they create recursive environments and freely available resources whose uses exceed these systems. The first aspect raises questions about the kind of aesthetics that are being embodied, the second creates a relation to the larger concept of the ‘commons.’ In Aesthetics of the Commons, the commons are understood not as a fixed set of principles that need to be adhered to in order to fit a definition, but instead as a ‘thinking tool’—in other words, the book’s interest lies in what can be made visible by applying the framework of the commons as a heuristic device.”

Contributors: Olga Goriunova, Jeremy Gilbert, Judith Siegmund, Daphne Dragona, Magdalena Tyzlik-Carver, Gary Hall, Ines Kleesattel, Sophie Toupin, Rahel Puffert and Christoph Brunner.

Publisher diaphanes, Zürich, January 2021
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 License
ISBN 9783035803914
275 pages

Review: Gerald Raunig (transversal, 2021, DE).

Project website
Book launch
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF

See also Open Scores: How to Program the Commons (2020).