Lisa Blackman: Loving the Alien: A Post-Post-Human Manifesto (2016)

7 July 2017, dusan

This essay explores the ambivalent position of the alien in order to reflect upon the question of whether there is a place for a non-body politic. Lisa Blackman brings together a number of different debates from “new biologies” to “alien phenomenologies” that provide some ways of framing a possible non-body politics founded on radical relationality, contingency and “inhuman formation” that might go some small way to recognising what might be at stake.

Publisher Fall Semester, Miami, 2016
Open access
22 pages
via Fall Semester

Publisher

PDF, PDF
Later version, published in Subjectivity, Apr 2017: HTML, PDF

Eric Hynes: Neither/Nor: Chimeric Cinema, New York City, 1967-1968 (2013)

20 June 2017, dusan

“Chimeras have existed since the advent of film, a form that has always simultaneously offered to record and represent, to capture and simulate life. But as filmmaker Jim McBride says, “Something was in the air” in the mid-to-late 1960s, particularly in New York City, where the likes of McBride, William Greaves, D.A. Pennebaker, as well as transients Peter Whitehead and Jean-Luc Godard, were making gloriously uncategorizable works of cinematic art. It was a moment when everything and everyone seemed to be riding, or even embracing, the edge of things, when films and politics and morality suddenly seemed undefined, up for grabs, subject to reinvention. With the Civil Rights era giving way to Black Power, Kennedy idealism ceding to Johnson’s military morass, Beat Dadaism transforming into hippie agitation, and mod Godard morphing into Mao Godard, it was as if utopia and dystopia were both within reach—if not one and the same.” (from the Introduction)

Publisher True False & Ragtag Cinema, 2013
Open access
31 pages

Publisher

JPGs
PDF

Osemdesata / The Eighties (2017) [Slovenian/English]

12 June 2017, dusan

A magazine and booklet for a trilogy of exhibitions focusing on the 1980s and their legacy organized by Moderna galerija in Ljubljana.

Edited by Adela Železnik and Ana Mizerit
Publisher Moderna galerija, Ljubljana, 2017
Open access
24 & 80 pages
via MG+MSUM

Exhibitions

Magazine (8 MB)
Booklet: The Heritage of 1989. Case Study: The Second Yugoslav Documents Exhibition (14 MB)

See also The 1980s: Today’s Beginnings? An Alternative View on the 80s (2016).

Craig Dworkin, Simon Morris, Nick Thurston: Do or DIY (2012)

8 June 2017, dusan

“Mixing anecdote and advocacy, the first section of this two-part polemical essay offers an introduction to the concealed history of do-it-yourself publishing—as undertaken by some of the most revered writers in the modern Western literary canon, from Laurence Sterne (1713–1768) to Irma Rombauer (1882–1941) via Virginia Woolf (1871–1922) and Derek Walcott (1930–).

Having looked back at some of the monuments of literary history, the second section takes its charge from the epigraph, ‘Institutions cannot prevent what they cannot imagine’, and looks forward to the political praxis of the 21st-century’s digital future.

The essay was first commissioned by the Foreword for the London Art Book Fair 2011 catalogue.”

Publisher Information as Material, York/UK, 2012
Creative Commons Attribution BY 2.5 Licence
ISBN 9781907468124
18 pages
via Electronic Poetry Center

Review: Christina Patterson (The Independent, 2012).

Publisher
WorldCat

Do or DIY (English, 2012)
Vydaj si sám (Slovak, trans. of excerpts, 2014)

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality (1982)

13 September 2016, dusan

Diary of a Conference on Sexuality is a conference program booklet designed by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson and published in conjunction with the ninth “Scholar and the Feminist” conference, “Towards a Politics of Sexuality,” held at Barnard College on April 24, 1982. Better known as the Barnard Sex Conference, the conference was a key event in the feminist sex wars of the 1980s. Organized by Carole Vance to explore the politics of sexuality, the conference was picketed by antipornography groups. While these protesters focused their objections on issues of pornography, S/M, and butch/femme, the conference addressed a much wider array of questions about women’s experiences of sexuality, some of which are represented here.

No ordinary conference program, the Diary included Vance’s invitation to presenters, a coauthored “Concept Paper” that described the conference’s aims and guiding questions, a list of speakers and schedule of events, as well as minutes from planning meetings, bibliographies of suggested reading, and a page devoted to each workshop. The Diary was, as Gayle Rubin later wrote, “intended to be something of an archival document.” Each speaker created a page in the Diary to represent her workshop; many of these included a “postcard” featuring some image that she found meaningful personally or in the context of the workshop. These images added to the visual impact of the program. With its striking images, its combination of politics, scholarship, and personal reflection, and its moments of insight, polemic, and humor, the Diary remains a compelling record of feminist collaboration.

In the days leading up to the conference, members of antipornography groups contacted the Barnard administration and issued a warning about what they saw as the “antifeminist” nature of the proceedings. In response, Barnard administrators confiscated 1,500 copies of the Diary two days before the conference. Despite subsequent reprinting, the Diary remains exceedingly rare.” (Heather Love, 2011)

Edited by Hannah Alderfer, Beth Jaker, and Marybeth Nelson
Publisher Faculty Press, New York, 1982
72 pages
via Dark Matter Archives

Commentary: Carole S. Vance (1984), Gayle Rubin (GLQ 2011).

WorldCat

PDF, PDF (18 MB)
See also conference proceedings (Pleasure and Danger, ed. Carole S. Vance, 1984, 462 pp)

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