Heath Bunting: How to Build a New Legal Identity (2014)

21 March 2018, dusan

“A close look at Heath Bunting’s work and the workshop in Athens. Heath Bunting is an artist whose work takes shape through various forms of action, documentation and visualization. By breaking the barriers between art and everyday life, Bunting gives priority to information and raw action. The present publication explores Bunting’s work through different aspects and constitutes a documentation of the event that took place in Athens on the 4th and 5th of May, 2012 at Frown project space.”

Publisher Frown Publishing, Athens
Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 International License
ISBN 9786188086302
[52] pages
via publisher

PDF
Issuu

Lisa Blackman: Loving the Alien: A Post-Post-Human Manifesto (2016)

7 July 2017, dusan

This essay explores the ambivalent position of the alien in order to reflect upon the question of whether there is a place for a non-body politic. Lisa Blackman brings together a number of different debates from “new biologies” to “alien phenomenologies” that provide some ways of framing a possible non-body politics founded on radical relationality, contingency and “inhuman formation” that might go some small way to recognising what might be at stake.

Publisher Fall Semester, Miami, 2016
Open access
22 pages
via Fall Semester

Publisher

PDF, PDF
Later version, published in Subjectivity, Apr 2017: HTML, PDF

Eric Hynes: Neither/Nor: Chimeric Cinema, New York City, 1967-1968 (2013)

20 June 2017, dusan

“Chimeras have existed since the advent of film, a form that has always simultaneously offered to record and represent, to capture and simulate life. But as filmmaker Jim McBride says, “Something was in the air” in the mid-to-late 1960s, particularly in New York City, where the likes of McBride, William Greaves, D.A. Pennebaker, as well as transients Peter Whitehead and Jean-Luc Godard, were making gloriously uncategorizable works of cinematic art. It was a moment when everything and everyone seemed to be riding, or even embracing, the edge of things, when films and politics and morality suddenly seemed undefined, up for grabs, subject to reinvention. With the Civil Rights era giving way to Black Power, Kennedy idealism ceding to Johnson’s military morass, Beat Dadaism transforming into hippie agitation, and mod Godard morphing into Mao Godard, it was as if utopia and dystopia were both within reach—if not one and the same.” (from the Introduction)

Publisher True False & Ragtag Cinema, 2013
Open access
31 pages

Publisher

JPGs
PDF