Amodern, 7: Ephemera and Ephemerality (2017)

5 December 2017, dusan

“Like some winged insects, ephemera – the plural of the Greek ephemeron – denotes things that last through the day. Maurice Rickards defined it as “the minor transient documents of everyday life” – bus tickets, business cards, bookmarks. Ephemera describes modern mass media forms such as the newspaper and radio broadcasts, as well as contemporary ones such as email and short message service. Ephemera haunts classical aesthetics, whose pretensions to cultural value and endurance can figuratively efface its own materiality and fragility. Ephemera similarly menaces concepts and practices of history, even when it serves as evidence of the past and the stuff of the archive. Indeed, ephemera problematizes memory itself: Wendy Hui Kyong Chun has theorized that digital media create an “enduring ephemeral” of constantly refreshing, regenerating information, introducing as much instability into computer programs as abides in putatively more fallible, degenerative human memory. With this observation, the paradox of ephemera – that it was meant to be disposable and fleeting, but is instead often kept and collected – comes into view as a central ambivalence of modern mediated life.”

With essays by Christina Svendsen, Mollie McFee, Priti Joshi, Kimberly Hall, Dennis Yi Tenen, Susan Zieger, Lindsay Brandon Hunter, and a conversation with Mita Mahato.

Edited by Priti Joshi and Susan Zieger
Publisher Concordia University and Lakehead University, December 2017
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

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Michael Kirby (ed.): Happenings: An Illustrated Anthology (1965)

28 July 2017, dusan

The book analyzes happenings as a new form of theatre comparable to collage and “compartmented” theater. Largely composed of statements, scripts, and illustrations of happenings by Allan Kaprow, Red Grooms, Robert Whitman, Jim Dine, and Claes Oldenburg.

Written and edited by Michael Kirby
Publisher E.P. Dutton, New York, 1965
287 pages

Review: Kirkus Rev (n.d.).

WorldCat

PDF (87 MB, no OCR)

In Terms of Performance (2016–)

26 July 2017, dusan

A keywords anthology designed to provoke discovery across artistic disciplines.

In Terms of Performance is designed to generate shared literacies for how we understand the goals, skills, and artistic traditions of experimental interdisciplinary work. Over the past few years we have gathered essays and interviews from key artists, curators, presenters, and scholars whose work reflects on relations among visual art, theatrical, choreographic, and performance art practices. To seed the conversation, we created a list of keywords: common yet contested terms in our current context, when museums are incorporating ever more time-based art forms, theaters are commissioning visual art for their stages, and symposiums try to make sense of how this cross-pollination changes the nature of curating, collecting, producing, authoring, documenting, and commissioning. Some of these keywords are older terms that have been resuscitated and redefined; others have made an appearance only recently. Our goal was not to produce singular definitions nor to commission encyclopedic entries but to share perspectives from distinct locations.”

Terms: Act, Amateur, Character, Choreography, Collecting, Composition, Curating, Documentation, Duration, Ephemerality, Experience Economy, Improvisation, Installation, Live, Media, Narrative, Participation, Performativity, Postdramatic, Poststudio, Prop, Reenactment, Relational, Score, Site, Spectator, Theatricality, Virtuosity.

Edited by Shannon Jackson and Paula Marincola
Publisher Arts Research Center at University of California, Berkeley, and The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, Philadelphia, 2016

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