Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968 (1998) [EN, JP]

17 December 2017, dusan

Yayoi Kusama’s work combines elements of expressionism, minimalism, surrealism and pop art.

“Although an active experimental artist throughout her time in New York during the ’50s and ’60s, Kusama had been largely forgotten by the United States public after her return to Japan in the ’70s. That is, until her artwork began circulating across the US and globe again in the mid-’90s. One of these major retrospectives, Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968, was co-organized by the Los Angeles Museum of Art and The Japan Foundation, and travelled from Los Angeles to New York City and to Minneapolis.

Kusama described this moment in her autobiography Infinity Net: “My exhibition at Robert Miller Gallery that year… won an AICA award. A review in Time Out said that ‘Kusama has kept out of sight, ensconcsed in her own infinite world, but now she’s back to reclaim her rightful place in the history of postmodernism…’ But the biggest highlight came in March 1998 when Love Forever opened at the Los Angeles Museum of Art. This grand retrospective cemented the reassessment of Kusama as a major avant-garde artist. It included some eighty pieces and had taken five years to compile.””

With essays by Lynn Zelevansky, Laura Hoptman, Akira Tatehata, and Alexandra Munroe.

Publisher Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, 1998
ISBN 087587181X, 9780875871813
195 pages
via MoMA

Online companion to exhibition (MoMA)
WorldCat

PDF (English, 1998)
PDF (Japanese, 1999)

Kobro and Strzemiński: Avant-Garde Prototypes (2017) [English, Spanish]

5 December 2017, dusan

Kataryna Kobro (1898-1951) and Władysław Strzemiński (1893-1952) are among the silent protagonists of the European avant-gardes, to which they contributed by both fostering and questioning the legacy of modernism with a plastic and theoretical oeuvre that was fertile as it was complex. Dedicated to experimentation on pure forms–Kobro fundamentally in sculpture and Strzemiński in painting–and closely related to international artistic movements like the Bauhaus, neoplasticism and constructivism, their work is pivotal for an understanding of abstract art in the Central Europe of the first decades of the twentieth century.”

With contributions by Jarosław Suchan, Christina Lodder, Gladys C. Fabre, Juan Manuel Bonet, and texts by Kobro and Strzemiński.

Publisher Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, and Muzeum Sztuki, Łódź, 2017
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License
ISBN 9788480265508, 8480265507
192 pages

Exhibition (Madrid)
Exhibition (Łódź)
Publisher
WorldCat

Kobro and Strzemiński: Avant-Garde Prototypes (English, 13 MB, PDF, Issuu)
Kobro y Strzemiński. Prototipos vanguardistas (Spanish, 13 MB, PDF, Issuu)

Women Artists: The Linda Nochlin Reader (2015)

30 October 2017, dusan

“Linda Nochlin (1931-2017) was one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline.

Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential essays from throughout Nochlin’s career, making this the definitive anthology of her writing about women in art. Included are her major thematic texts “Women Artists After the French Revolution” and “Starting from Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History,” as well as the landmark essay and its rejoinder “‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’ Thirty Years After.” These appear alongside monographic entries focusing on a selection of major women artists including Mary Cassatt, Louise Bourgeois, Cecily Brown, Kiki Smith, Miwa Yanagi, and Sophie Calle.

Women Artists also presents two new essays written specifically for this book and an interview with Nochlin investigating the position of women artists today.”

Edited by Maura Reilly
Publisher Thames & Hudson, London and New York, 2015
ISBN 9780500239292, 0500239290
472 pages

Reviews: Chris Kraus (NY Times, 2015), Publishers Weekly (2015).

Publisher
WorldCat

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