MediaImpact / MediaUdar (2012) [English/Russian]

22 July 2017, dusan

Catalogue of the international festival of activist art МедиаУдар (MediaImpact), held in autumn 2011 in Moscow. Includes descriptions of 68 recent works; texts by Tatiana Volkova, Arseny Sergeev, Oksana Sarkisyan, Anton Nikolayev, Pablo Hermann, Kostis Stafylakis, Oleg Genisaretskiy, and Peter Weibel; and interviews with Mike Bonnano, Nina Felshin, and Andrew Boyd.

Editing: Tatiana Volkova
Coordination: Joulia Strauss
Publisher MediaImpact, Moscow, with ZKM, Karlsruhe, 2012
ISBN 9785990375512
359 pages
via publisher

Publisher

PDF (12 MB)
Issuu

See also two subsequent Russian-language anthologies of texts, MediaUdar: aktivistskoe iskusstvo segodnya (2014, 6 MB) and MediaUdar: aktivistskoe iskusstvo segodnya II (2016, 51 MB).

Sounding Off! Music as Subversion/Resistance/Revolution (1995)

16 July 2017, dusan

Under the rallying cry of ‘Music is our bomb!’, this book collects thirty-eight articles and interviews with all sorts of practitioners of musicopolitical activism.

Edited by Ron Sakolsky and Fred Wei-han Ho
Publisher Autonomedia, Brooklyn, NY, 1995
ISBN 1570270589, 9781570270581
352 pages

WorldCat

PDF (16 MB, updated on 2017-7-19 to OCR version via esco_bar)

Aymeric Mansoux: Sandbox Culture: A Study of the Application of Free and Open Source Software Licensing Ideas to Art and Cultural Production (2017)

7 July 2017, dusan

“In partial response to the inability of intellectual property laws to adapt to data-sharing over computer networks, several initiatives have proposed techno-legal alternatives to encourage the free circulation and transformation of digital works. These alternatives have shaped part of contemporary digital culture for more than three decades and are today often associated with the “free culture” movement. The different strands of this movement are essentially derived from a narrower concept of software freedom developed in the 1980s, and which is enforced within free and open source software (FLOSS) communities. This principle was the first significant effort to articulate a reusable techno-legal template to work around the limitations of intellectual property laws. It also offered a vision of network culture where community participation and sharing was structural.

From alternate tools and workflow systems, artist-run servers, network publishing experiments, open data and design lobbies, cooperative and collaborative frameworks, but also novel copyright licensing used by both non-profit organisations and for-profit corporations, the impact on cultural production of practices developed in relation to the ideas of FLOSS has been both influential and broadly applied. However, if it is true that FLOSS has indeed succeeded in becoming a theoretical and practical model for the transformation of art and culture, the question remains at which ways it has provided such a model, how it has been effectively appropriated across different groups and contexts and in what ways these overlap or differ.

Using the image of the sandbox, where code becomes a constituent device for different communities to experience varying ideologies and practices, this dissertation aims to map the consequent levels of divergence in interpreting and appropriating the free and open source techno-legal template. This thesis identifies the paradoxes, conflicts, and contradictions within free culture discourse. It explores the tensions between the wish to provide a theoretical universal definition of cultural freedom, and the disorderly reality of its practice and interpretation. However, despite the different layers of cultural diffusion, appropriation, misunderstanding and miscommunication that together form the fabric of free culture, this dissertation argues that, even though feared, fought, and criticised, these issues are not signs of dysfunctionality but are instead the evidence of cultural diversity within free culture. This dissertation will also demonstrate that conflicts between and within these sandboxes create a democratic process that permits the constant transformation of the free and open source discourse, and is therefore something that should be embraced and neither resisted nor substituted for a universal approach to cultural production.”

Includes an anthology of proto-free culture licenses, 1998-2002 (pp 382-452).

PhD Dissertation
Supervisor: Matthew Fuller
Publisher Centre of Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London, 2017
xxxviii+486 pages
via author

PDF, PDF (7 MB)

Kasper Opstrup: The Way Out: Invisible Insurrections and Radical Imaginaries in the UK Underground, 1961-1991 (2017)

22 June 2017, dusan

“A counterculture history of art and experimental politics that turns the world inside out

The Way Out examines the radical political and hedonist imaginaries of the experimental fringes of the UK Underground from 1961 to 1991. By examining the relations between collective and collaborative practices with an explicit agenda of cultural revolution, Kasper Opstrup charts a hidden history of experiments with cultural engineering, expanding current discussions of art, medias, politics, radical education and the occult revival. Even though the theatres of operation have changed with the rise of the Internet and a globalised finance economy, these imaginaries still raise questions that speak directly to the present.

Here we encounter a series of figures – including Alexander Trocchi, R. D. Laing, Joseph Berke, Brion Gysin, William Burroughs and Genesis P-Orridge – that blurred the lines between inner and outer, the invisible and the material. Four singular forms of speculative techniques for igniting an invisible insurrection with cultural means make up the central case studies: the sigma project, London Anti-University, Academy 23 and thee Temple ov Psychick Youth.

Contained within these imaginaries is a new type of action university: a communal affair that would improvise a new type of social relation into existence by de-programming and de-conditioning us without any blueprints for the future besides to make it happen. Instead of being turned upside down, the world was to be changed from the inside out.”

Publisher Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe, 2017
ISBN 9781570273285
252 pages

Publisher

PDF, PDF
Scribd

Georges Didi-Huberman (ed.): Uprisings (2016)

4 April 2017, dusan

“While the notion of revolution, rebellion, and revolt isn’t alien in contemporary society’s vocabulary, the object of its action is replete with collective amnesia and inertia. That is why analyzing the representations of “uprisings”—from the etchings Goya, to contemporary installations, paintings, photographs, documents, videos, and films—demonstrates an unequivocal relevance to the social context in which we are living in 2016.

Constructing a chronological narrative or an exhaustive review of “uprisings” is not the aim. Thousands of representations of the gesture to say “NO,” to shout “STOP,” or to raise the banner “THEY SHALL NOT PASS” exist. They are known by women, men, and children, by workers, artists, and poets, by those who cry out and those who are silent, by those who weep, who mourn and those who make them. Uprisings is a montage of these words, gestures, and actions, which defy submission to absolute power.” (from the Foreword)

Published on the occasion of the exhibition Uprisings (Soulèvements) presented at the Jeu de Paume, Paris, from 18 October 2016 to 15 January 2017.

Foreword by Marta Gili
Introduction by Georges Didi-Huberman
Texts by Nicole Brenez, Judith Butler, Marie-José Mondzain, Antonio Negri, Jacques Rancière
Publisher Jeu de Paume, Paris, and Gallimard, Paris, 2016
ISBN 2072697298, 9782072697296
420 pages

Exhibition reviews: Joseph Nechvatal (Hyperallergic), Vivian Sky Rehberg (Frieze), Emily Nathan (Artnet).

Exhibition
Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (removed on 2017-6-9 upon request from distributor)

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