Defiant Muses: Delphine Seyrig and the Feminist Video Collectives in France, 1970s-1980s (2019)

25 March 2020, dusan

“This publication explores the intersection between the histories of cinema, video and feminism in France. Focusing on the emergence of video collectives in the 1970s, the exhibition proposes to reconsider the history of the feminist movement in France through a set of media practices and looks at a network of creative alliances that emerged in a time of political turmoil.”

Contributors: Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez, Giovanna Zapperi, Alexandre Moussa, Ros Murray, François Vergès, Élisabeth Lebovici, Nicole Fernández Ferrer.

Introduction by Nataša Petrešin-Bachelez and Giovanna Zapperi
Publisher Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía (MACBA), Barcelona, 2019
Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License
ISBN 9788480266000, 8480266007 (EN)
231 pages

Exhibition
Publisher (EN)
WorldCat (EN)

English: PDF, PDF (20 MB)
Spanish: PDF, PDF (20 MB)

Kodwo Eshun, Anjalika Sagar (eds.): The Ghosts of Songs: The Film Art of the Black Audio Film Collective, 1982-1998 (2007)

13 September 2019, dusan

The Ghosts of Songs is the first book-length exploration of the work of the Black Audio Film Collective. The collective, founded in 1982 and dissolved in 1998, comprised John Akomfrah, Lina Gopaul, Reece Auguiste, Avril Johnson, Trevor Mathison, Edward George and David Lawson, and for sixteen years their films addressed the social, political and racial crises of Thatcher’s Britain and beyond. However, it would be limiting their achievement to see them either as merely challenging the hegemonic forms of mass media, or conversely as polemicist film activists. In films such as Expeditions, Handsworth Songs, Seven Songs for Malcolm X and Twilight City, the collective explored and developed a black film aesthetic. The essays in this volume, contributed by Jean Fisher, Kodwo Eshun, Kobena Mercer and Okwui Enwezor, argue that they inaugurated themselves as an artist-group, laying claim to the right to reconfigure the space of cinema around the Afrodiasporic subject, reconceptualizing lighting, film stock, developing and printing, and inventing the forms that black cinema might take.”

Publisher Liverpool University Press, and FACT, Liverpool, 2007
Changing Media, Changing Europe series
ISBN 1846310148, 9781846310140
239 pages

Review: Alexandra M. Kokoli (The Art Book, 2008).

WorldCat

PDF (62 MB)

Dubravka Djurić, Miško Šuvaković (eds.): Impossible Histories: Historical Avant-gardes, Neo-avant-gardes, and Post-avant-gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991 (2003)

25 August 2019, dusan

Impossible Histories is the first critical survey of the extraordinary experiments in the arts that took place in the former Yugoslavia from the country’s founding in 1918 to its breakup in 1991. The combination of Austro-Hungarian, French, German, Italian, and Turkish influences gave Yugoslavia’s avant-gardes a distinct character unlike those of other Eastern and Central European avant-gardes. The book explores movements such as Belgrade surrealism, signalism, Yugo-Dada, and zenitism; the groups Alfa, Exat 51, Gorgona, OHO, and Scipion Nasice Sisters Theater; or the magazines Danas, Rdeči pilot, Tank, Vecnost, and Zvrk.

The pieces in this collection offer comparative and interpretive accounts of the avant-gardes in the former Yugoslavian countries of Croatia, Serbia, and Slovenia. The book is divided into four sections: Art and Politics; Literature; Visual Art and Architecture; and Art in Motion (covering theater, dance, music, film, and video). All of the contributors live in the region and many of them participated in the movements discussed. The book also reprints a selection of the most important manifestos generated by all phases of Yugoslav avant-garde activity.”

Publisher MIT Press, 2003
ISBN 0262042169, 9780262042161
xviii+605 pages
via agitprop

Reviews: Matthew S. Witkovsky (caa.reviews, 2004), Yevgeniy Fiks (Art Journal, 2004), Tyrus Miller (Modernism/modernity, 2005), Igor Marjanović (Design Issues, 2007).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (22 MB)