Richard Kostelanetz (ed.): Text–Sound Texts (1980)

28 July 2017, dusan

Anthology of scores, scripts, instructions, diagrams and documentation of art works that are meant to be heard. With more than one hundred pieces from a broad range of the 1960′s and 1970′s experimental artists from the music, art, literature, theater, and film worlds, including: John Cage, Guy de Coinet, Else von Freytag-Loringhoven, Allen Ginsberg, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Glenn Gould, Dick Higgins, Jack Kerouac, Annea Lockwood, Alvin Lucier, Jackson Mac Low, bp Nichol, Claes Oldenburg, Mary Ellen Solt, Gertrude Stein, Emmett Williams, and Robert Wilson, among others.

Publisher William Morrow, New York, 1980
ISBN 0688036163, 9780688036164
441 pages, 23.5 x 16 cm

WorldCat

PDF (100 MB)

Stamatia Portanova: Moving without a Body: Digital Philosophy and Choreographic Thoughts (2013)

26 February 2015, dusan

“Digital technologies offer the possibility of capturing, storing, and manipulating movement, abstracting it from the body and transforming it into numerical information. In Moving without a Body, Stamatia Portanova considers what really happens when the physicality of movement is translated into a numerical code by a technological system. Drawing on the radical empiricism of Gilles Deleuze and Alfred North Whitehead, she argues that this does not amount to a technical assessment of software’s capacity to record motion but requires a philosophical rethinking of what movement itself is, or can become.

Discussing the development of different audiovisual tools and the shift from analog to digital, she focuses on some choreographic realizations of this evolution, including works by Loie Fuller and Merce Cunningham. Throughout, Portanova considers these technologies and dances as ways to think—rather than just perform or perceive—movement. She distinguishes the choreographic thought from the performance: a body performs a movement, and a mind thinks or choreographs a dance. Similarly, she sees the move from analog to digital as a shift in conception rather than simply in technical realization. Analyzing choreographic technologies for their capacity to redesign the way movement is thought, Moving without a Body offers an ambitiously conceived reflection on the ontological implications of the encounter between movement and technological systems.”

Publisher MIT Press, 2013
Technologies of Lived Abstraction series
ISBN 0262018926, 9780262018920
200 pages

Reviews: Donnarumma (Mute, 2014), Murphy (Afterimage, 2014), Thain (Digicult).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (11 MB)

Paul Hillier: Arvo Pärt (1997)

20 January 2015, dusan

“The music of the Estonian-born composer Arvo Pärt (1935) is a unique and powerful voice in the contemporary world. Using a tonal idiom based on a mixture of scales and triads, Pärt created a style that he calls `tintinnabuli’. Listening to it, one is reminded of the passionate and tranquility of some Russian icon, or of certain memorable scenes in the films of Andrei Tarkovsky.

In this book, the first full-length study of Pärt, Paul Hillier explores the tintinnabuli works in considerable depth. He also examines the music of Pärt’s earlier, somewhat neglected serial period, and charts the composer’s steady evolution towards the `abstract tonality’ of his later years.

In addition, a biographical chapter and discussion of topics such as Russian Orthodox spirituality, minimalism, and the influence of early music, combine to make this a substantial introduction to Pärt’s music. Hillier also draws on his own experience of working with the composer to offer thoughts on various performance issues.”

Publisher Oxford University Press, 1997
Oxford Studies of Composers series
ISBN 0198165501, 9780198165507
219 pages

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (no OCR, 78 MB)

See also 1-hour documentary, Who is Arvo Pärt? (A Journey into the Mind of a Composer), directed by Dorian Supin (1990).