Jindřich Štyrský: Emilie Comes to Me in a Dream (1933/1997)

10 October 2017, dusan

Jindřich Štyrský (1899–1942) was a painter, poet, photographer, collage artist and editor. A founding member of The Surrealist Group of Czechoslovakia he edited Erotická revue that included illustrations by well-known Czech artists and had an imprint called Edice 69 (Edition 69) where Emilie přichází ke mně ve snu, a portfolio of 10 erotic surrealist photo-collages, appeared in 1933 as its sixth and final volume. Štyrský believed that in pornography he had found a destabilizing medium that could be used to subvert established social and artistic norms. Bohuslav Brouk, a psychoanalyst affiliated with the Czech surrealists, contributed an afterword in which he commented forcefully on the subject of pornography as art. Despite its small run of 69 copies, the book is now considered a masterpiece of Czech Surrealism.

This new edition contains 12 collages, two of which were edited out from the original.

New edition
With an afterword by Bohuslav Brouk
Publisher Ubu Gallery, New York, 1997
35 pages
via Oh Top Book Photobooks

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (low res, 5 MB)
See also collection of 21 collages in Centre Pompidou

Theories of Modern Art: A Source Book by Artists and Critics (1968)

18 July 2017, dusan

“A collection of texts from letters, manifestos, notes and interviews. Sources include, as the title says, artists and critics—some expected, like van Gogh, Gauguin, Apollinaire, Mondrian, Greenberg, just to name a few—and some less so: Trotsky and Hitler, in the section on Art and Politics. The book is a wonderful resource and insight into the way artists think and work.”

Edited by Herschel Browning Chipp
Contributions by Peter Selz and Joshua C. Taylor
Publisher University of California Press, 1968
ISBN 0520014502
xv+664 pages

Reviews: Romare H. Bearden and Carl Holty (Leonardo, 1970), Elizabeth Gilmore Holt (Art Bulletin, 1972).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (179 MB, no OCR)

Alastair Brotchie, Mel Gooding (eds.): A Book of Surrealist Games (1995)

14 April 2017, dusan

“This delightful collection allows everyone to enjoy firsthand the provocative methods used by the artists and poets of the Surrealist school to break through conventional thought and behavior to a deeper truth. Invented and played by such artists as André Breton, Rene Magritte, and Max Ernst, these gems still produce results ranging from the hilarious to the mysterious and profound.”

First published 1993
Publisher Shambhala Redstone, Boston & London, 1995
ISBN 1570620849, 9781570620843
165 pages
via Blanca Alaníz

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (54 MB)

Leonora Carrington: The Hearing Trumpet (1974–)

18 January 2017, dusan

The Hearing Trumpet is the story of 92-year-old Marian Leatherby, who is given the gift of a hearing trumpet only to discover that what her family is saying is that she is to be committed to an institution. But this is an institution where the buildings are shaped like birthday cakes and igloos, where the Winking Abbess and the Queen Bee reign, and where the gateway to the underworld is open. It is also the scene of a mysterious murder. Occult twin to Alice in Wonderland, The Hearing Trumpet is a classic of fantastic literature.”

First published as Le Cornet acoustique by Flammarion, Paris, 1974.

Introduction by Helen Byatt
Illustrations by Pablo Weisz Carrington
Publisher Exact Change, Boston, 1996
ISBN 1878972197
xix+199 pages
via psb

Commentary: Tobias Carroll (Paris Review, 2013).

WorldCat
Publisher

PDF (6 MB)

R. Bruce Elder: Dada, Surrealism, and the Cinematic Effect (2013)

15 October 2016, dusan

“This book deals with the early intellectual reception of the cinema and the manner in which art theorists, philosophers, cultural theorists, and especially artists of the first decades of the twentieth century responded to its advent. While the idea persists that early writers on film were troubled by the cinema’s lowly form, this work proposes that there was another, largely unrecognized, strain in the reception of it. Far from anxious about film’s provenance in popular entertainment, some writers and artists proclaimed that the cinema was the most important art for the moderns, as it exemplified the vibrancy of contemporary life.

This view of the cinema was especially common among those whose commitments were to advanced artistic practices. Their notions about how to recast the art media (or the forms forged from those media’s materials) and the urgency of doing so formed the principal part of the conceptual core of the artistic programs advanced by the vanguard art movements of the first half of the twentieth century. This book, a companion to the author’s previous, Harmony & Dissent, examines the Dada and Surrealist movements as responses to the advent of the cinema.”

Publisher Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, 2013
Film and Media Studies series
ISBN 9781554586257, 1554586259
x+765 pages

Reviews: John W. Locke (Canadian J of Film Studies 2014), Robin Walz (Canadian J of History 2014), Bart Testa (U Toronto Quarterly 2015).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF (8 MB)

Recent comments
Recent entries
More resources