Margit Rowell, Deborah Wye: The Russian Avant-Garde Book, 1910-1934 (2002–) [English, Spanish]

17 September 2016, dusan

“Russian avant-garde books made between 1900s-30s reflect a vivid and tumultuous period in that nation’s history that had ramifications for art, society, and politics. The early books, with their variously sized pages of coarse paper, illustrations entwined with printed, hand-written, and stamped texts, and provocative covers, were intended to shock academic conventions and bourgeois sensibilities. After the 1917 Revolution, books appeared with optimistic designs and photomontage meant to reach the masses and symbolize a rational, machine-led future. Later books showcased modern Soviet architecture and industry in the service of the government’s agenda.

Major artists adopted the book format during these two decades. They include Natalia Goncharova, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Olga Rozanova, the Stenberg brothers, Varvara Stepanova, and others. These artists often collaborated with poets, who created their own transrational language to accompany the imaginative illustrations. Three major artistic movements, Futurism, Suprematism, and Constructivism, that developed during this period in painting and sculpture also found their echo in the book format.

This publication accompanied an exhibition of Russian avant-garde books at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Featuring some 300 books, this was the most comprehensive exhibition ever devoted exclusively to the illustrated books made during this period. It was prompted by a gift to MoMA of more than 1,000 Russian avant-garde illustrated books from The Judith Rothschild Foundation, New York.”

With essays by Deborah Wye, Nina Gurianova, Jared Ash, Gerald Janecek, and Margit Rowell.

Publisher Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2002
ISBN 0870700073, 9780870700071
304 pages
via MoMA

Reviews: Holland Cotter (NY Times, 2002), Steven Heller (Eye, 2002).
Exh. review: Kristin M. Jones (Frieze, 2002).

Exhibition website
Publisher (incl. installation views)
WorldCat

English: PDF, PDF (2002, 72 MB)
Spanish: PDF, PDF (2003, 74 MB)

Johanna Drucker: Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production (2014)

25 May 2016, dusan

“In our current screen-saturated culture, we take in more information through visual means than at any point in history. The computers and smart phones that constantly flood us with images do more than simply convey information. They structure our relationship to information through graphical formats. Learning to interpret how visual forms not only present but produce knowledge, says Johanna Drucker, has become an essential contemporary skill.

Graphesis provides a descriptive critical language for the analysis of graphical knowledge. In an interdisciplinary study fusing digital humanities with media studies and graphic design history, Drucker outlines the principles by which visual formats organize meaningful content. Among the most significant of these formats is the graphical user interface (GUI)—the dominant feature of the screens of nearly all consumer electronic devices. Because so much of our personal and professional lives is mediated through visual interfaces, it is important to start thinking critically about how they shape knowledge, our behavior, and even our identity.

Information graphics bear tell-tale signs of the disciplines in which they originated: statistics, business, and the empirical sciences. Drucker makes the case for studying visuality from a humanistic perspective, exploring how graphic languages can serve fields where qualitative judgments take priority over quantitative statements of fact. Graphesis offers a new epistemology of the ways we process information, embracing the full potential of visual forms and formats of knowledge production.”

Publisher Harvard University Press, 2014
metaLABprojects series
ISBN 0674724933, 9780674724938
215 pages

Reviews: Scott McLemee (Inside Higher Ed 2014), Maggie Sattler (Zeteo 2014), Cory Taylor (2014), Johannah Rodgers (Brooklyn Rail 2015).

Publisher
WorldCat

PDF, PDF (17 MB, updated on 2016-8-15)

See also Drucker’s 2010 Graphesis article.

Visible Language (1967–)

15 January 2016, dusan

Visible Language is the oldest peer–reviewed design journal, first published in 1967. For it’s first four years, it was published under the title The Journal of Typographic Research.

The primary tenet of its foundation was that reading and writing together form a new, separate, and autonomous language system. From its initial focus on typography, it has evolved with the changing landscape of communication design to embrace interdisciplinary relationships with anthropology, art, design, education, English and linguistics. The journal has covered subjects such as concrete poetry, artists’ books, Fluxus, painted text, textual criticism, the abstraction of symbols, articulatory synthesis and text, and the evolution of the page from print to on-screen display.

Visible Language was founded by Merald Wrolstad who served as editor and publisher until 1987. The following 26 years (1987-2012) it was edited by Sharon Poggenpohl of the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Institute of Design, with administrative offices at the Rhode Island School of Design. Currently, it is edited by Mike Zender of the University of Cincinnati, which publishes and provides administrative offices for the journal.

Edited by Merald E. Wrolstad (1-80), Sharon Poggenpohl (81-155), Mike Zender (156-)
Publisher Merald E. Wrolstad (1-80), Sharon Poggenpohl (81-155), University of Cincinatti (156-)
ISSN 0022-2224
via Stéphanie Vilayphiou, via Natacha Roussel

Announcement about the journal going open access

PDFs of issues 1–157 (with abstracts in HTML, PDFs of some issues missing)

Special issues:
40 Spelling, ed. Richard L. Venezky
44 Barthes: Beyond the Empire of Signs, ed. Steven Ungar
45 The Interface of Reading and Listening, ed. Dominic W. Massaro
51 Behavioural Studies of the Handwriting Skill, ed. Alan M. Wing
52 Theory, Research, Experiment, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
57 Spatial Factors in Typography, ed. James Hartley
58-59 Visual Cues in Word Recognition and Reading, Part 2, ed. Keith Rayner
65 Calligraphy, ed. Gunnlaugur SE Briem
66 The Renascence of Die Hermeneute, ed. Charles Robert Kline, Jr.
70 Some Effects of Communications Medium on Visible Language, ed. Patricia Wright
71 Aspects of the Japanese Writing System, ed. Chris Seeley
72 Psychological Processes in Reading, ed. Dominic W. Massaro
73 ATyp1, ed. Charles Bigelow
74 Graphic Design Computer Graphics, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
76 The Book, Inside and Out, ed. Judith Preckshot
77 Pattern Poetry: A Symposium, ed. Dick Higgins
78 Promoting Plain English, ed. Erwin R. Steinberg
79 The Origins and Functions of Literacy, eds. David Olson & Derrick De Kerckove
81 Bi-Graphic Differences: Languages in Con(tact)(flict), ed. Richard Hodgson
83 Then and Now: Readers Learning to Write, ed. E. Jennifer Monaghan
84 The Avant-Garde and the Text, ed. Stephen C. Foster
85 Lipreading, ed. Ruth Campbell
86 Literacy Literacy, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
87 Instant Theory: Making Things Popular, ed. Craig Saper
88 The Printed Poem and the Reader, ed. Richard Bradford
89 Inscriptions in Paintings, ed. Claude Gandelman
95 The Artist’s Book: The Text and Its Rivals, ed. Renée Riese Hubert
97 Fluxus: A Conceptual Country, ed. Estera Milman
98 Diagrams as Tools for Worldmaking, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
99 Writing in Stereo: Bilingualism in the Text, ed. Richard Hodgson
101 Visual Poetry: An International Anthology, ed. Harry Polkinhorn
104-106 New Perspectives: Critical Histories of Graphic Design, Part 2, Part 3, ed. Andrew Blauvelt
107 The Luminous Object: Video Art/Video Theory, ed. Andrew Blauvelt and Herman Rapaport
108 Money!, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
110 New Media Poetry, ed. Eduardo Kac
119-120 Words in Space, Part 2, ed. Sharon Helmer Poggenpohl
123 Voicimage, ed. Enzo Minarelli
125 Limits of Language, Limits of Worlds, ed. Dietmar Winkler
127 An Annotated Design Research Bibliography, ed. Praima Chayutsahakij
131 Instruction and Provocation, or Relearning from Las Vegas, ed. Michael Golec
137 Fluxus and Legacy, ed. Ken Friedman
138 Fluxus After Fluxus, ed. Ken Friedman
143 Visual Metaphors in User Support, ed. Karel van der Waarde
144 After the Grave: Language and Materiality in Contemporary Art, ed. David Scott Armstrong
148-149 Communication Design Failures, Part 2, ed. Sharon Poggenpohl and Dietmar R. Winkler
150 Global Interaction in Design, ed. Audrey Grace Bennett
152 Punctuation, ed. Anne Toner
154 Envisioning a Future Design Education, ed. Sharon Poggenpohl

More on design research

Libre Graphics Magazine 2(4): Capture (2015)

10 December 2015, dusan

“This issue looks at Capture, the act of encompassing, emulating and encapsulating difficult things, subtle qualities. Through a set of articles we explore capture mechanisms, memory, archiving and preservation of volatile digital information, physicality and aesthetization of data.”

With contributions by Raphäel Bastide, Antonio Roberts, Eric Schrijver, Birgit Bachler, Walter Langelaar, Stéphanie Vilayphiou, Scandinavian Institute for Computational Vandalism, Sebastian Schmieg, Kenneth Goldsmith, Robert M Ochshorn, Jessica Fenlon, Anna Carreras, Carles Domènech and Mariona Roca.

Edited by Ana Isabel Carvalho, ginger coons and Ricardo Lafuente
Publisher ginger coons, Dec 2015
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike license
ISSN 1925-1416
50 pages

Publisher

PDF (low res, 25 MB)
PDF (hi-res, 140 MB)
Source files

Alexandre Leray, Stéphanie Vilayphiou (eds.): Considering Your Tools: A Reader for Designers and Developers (2013)

6 October 2015, dusan

“A teaching tool that makes the research accessible to design students and young professionals. This reader will provide them with accessible theory so that they can put the radical changes that are taking place in their profession, into perspective.”

“Today’s creation largely depends on digital tools. Far from being a neutral means to an artistic achievement, those tools are actually opinionated: they carry values and are full of conventions about the way things “ought” to be done. To us, a greater awareness of the role of digital tools is—if important to everybody—crucial in the education of artists and designers. Instead of means, the soft- and hardware tools can become partners to consciously think and converse with, to question and interrogate and to clash with. And because (visual) creation is so tightly coupled with technological development, a larger awareness of these tools can help one speculate about future practices and invent the tools to support them.

Contrary to other contemporary fields of creation, there is little literature on these questions in the sphere of graphic design. This is why we felt it was important to bring together texts and showcases on this topic into one comprehensive corpus: a tool to think about tools.

This publication contains newly commissioned, translated and re-issued texts, distributed over 5 chapters: Discrete Gestures is about how our body is informed by our digital tools; Reading Interfaces takes on different approaches to computer literacy; The Making of the Standards is about the social and technical processes behind the elaboration of norms; Myriadic Composition Tools tackles the question of software as a cultural object through the lens of digital typography; Finally, Shaping Processes discusses methodologies for open and critical collective practices. For each chapter, a short note problematize the questions behind the texts.”

With texts by Isabelle Stengers (0); Gerrit Noordzij, William A. Dwiggins, Evan Roth et al., Donald E. Knuth, Vilém Flusser, Friedrich A. Kittler, George Francis, Pierre Huyghebaert (1); Florian Cramer, Alexandre Leray and Stéphanie Vilayphiou, Olia Lialina, Lev Manovich (2); Denis Jacquerye, Unicode Inc., Anthony Froshaug, Open Source Publishing, Henri de Montrond, Martin Arnaud, Mark Pilgrim, Mailing list www-talk, Eric Schrijver (3); Maurice Girod, Robin Kinross, Femke Snelting and Alexandre Leray, Jacques André et al. (4); Christopher M. Kelty, Matthew Fuller, and Aitor Méndez (5).

Co-editors: Nicolas Malevé, Yvan Monroy Lopez, Lilly Nguyen, Camille Pageard, and Eric Schrijver
Publisher Libre Graphics Research Group, May 2013
Various licenses

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